Nursing: Management of PTSD for Healthcare Professionals
11.95
Online
Elective
Please select your state to enroll in this course
About the Course

Stress is an adaptive response to demands or challenges made on an individual that might be required for survival. Adapting to stressful events is an individual response, and treatment is best targeted to the time immediately after the trauma. Post-traumatic stress disorder or PTSD has long-term physical and psychological sequelae that can affect the health and lifelong functioning of the patient. The purpose of this course is to help health care workers in their treatment of patients with PTSD, and to provide early intervention which can include psychological and pharmacological treatment. This course helps to prepare health care professionals to differentiate types of trauma, analyze a patient’s response to trauma, and provide appropriate traditional and holistic treatment options.

Learning Outcomes
After completing this course, the learner will be able to:
  • Differentiate among the types of trauma in adults and children.
  • Interpret the patient’s neurobiological response to trauma.
  • Apply psychological and pharmacological treatment concepts for patients with posttraumatic stress disorder.

About the Authors
Karen S. Ward, PhD, MSN, RN, COI

Karen S. Ward, PhD, MSN, RN, COI, received BSN and MSN degrees in psychiatric-mental health nursing from Vanderbilt University and a PhD in developmental psychology from Cornell University. She is a professor at the Middle Tennessee State University School of Nursing, where she has taught in both the undergraduate and graduate programs. Dr. Ward’s work has been published in journals such as Nurse Educator, Journal of Nursing Scholarship, Journal of Emotional Abuse, and Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America. Dr. Ward’s research interests include child and adolescent maltreatment, mental health, and wellness issues (stress and depression), leadership variables, and survivorship.

Debra Rose Wilson, PhD, MSN, RN, IBCLC, AHN-BC, CHT

Debra Rose Wilson, PhD, MSN, RN, IBCLC, AHN-BC, CHT, received an MSN in holistic nursing from Tennessee State University School of Nursing and a PhD in health psychology with a focus in psychoneuroimmunology from Walden University. She has expertise in public health, psychiatric nursing, wellness, and disease prevention. Dr. Wilson has a private practice as a holistic nurse and is an internationally known speaker on stress and self-care. Dr. Wilson was named the 2017-2018 American Holistic Nurse of the Year and is on the faculty at both Austin Peay State University School of Nursing and at Walden University.

About the Reviewer
Cindy Parsons, DNP, ARNP, BC

Cindy Parsons, DNP, ARNP, BC, is a Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner and educator. She earned her Doctor of Nursing Practice at Rush University, Illinois and her Nurse Practitioner preparation from Pace University, New York. Dr. Parsons is an Associate Professor of Nursing at the University of Tampa and maintains a part-time private practice. 
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Management of PTSD for Healthcare Professionals - N57063

11.95
About the Course

Stress is an adaptive response to demands or challenges made on an individual that might be required for survival. Adapting to stressful events is an individual response, and treatment is best targeted to the time immediately after the trauma. Post-traumatic stress disorder or PTSD has long-term physical and psychological sequelae that can affect the health and lifelong functioning of the patient. The purpose of this course is to help health care workers in their treatment of patients with PTSD, and to provide early intervention which can include psychological and pharmacological treatment. This course helps to prepare health care professionals to differentiate types of trauma, analyze a patient’s response to trauma, and provide appropriate traditional and holistic treatment options.

Learning Outcomes
After completing this course, the learner will be able to:
  • Differentiate among the types of trauma in adults and children.
  • Interpret the patient’s neurobiological response to trauma.
  • Apply psychological and pharmacological treatment concepts for patients with posttraumatic stress disorder.

About the Authors
Karen S. Ward, PhD, MSN, RN, COI

Karen S. Ward, PhD, MSN, RN, COI, received BSN and MSN degrees in psychiatric-mental health nursing from Vanderbilt University and a PhD in developmental psychology from Cornell University. She is a professor at the Middle Tennessee State University School of Nursing, where she has taught in both the undergraduate and graduate programs. Dr. Ward’s work has been published in journals such as Nurse Educator, Journal of Nursing Scholarship, Journal of Emotional Abuse, and Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America. Dr. Ward’s research interests include child and adolescent maltreatment, mental health, and wellness issues (stress and depression), leadership variables, and survivorship.

Debra Rose Wilson, PhD, MSN, RN, IBCLC, AHN-BC, CHT

Debra Rose Wilson, PhD, MSN, RN, IBCLC, AHN-BC, CHT, received an MSN in holistic nursing from Tennessee State University School of Nursing and a PhD in health psychology with a focus in psychoneuroimmunology from Walden University. She has expertise in public health, psychiatric nursing, wellness, and disease prevention. Dr. Wilson has a private practice as a holistic nurse and is an internationally known speaker on stress and self-care. Dr. Wilson was named the 2017-2018 American Holistic Nurse of the Year and is on the faculty at both Austin Peay State University School of Nursing and at Walden University.

About the Reviewer
Cindy Parsons, DNP, ARNP, BC

Cindy Parsons, DNP, ARNP, BC, is a Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner and educator. She earned her Doctor of Nursing Practice at Rush University, Illinois and her Nurse Practitioner preparation from Pace University, New York. Dr. Parsons is an Associate Professor of Nursing at the University of Tampa and maintains a part-time private practice.