Disciplines: Respiratory Therapy
Hours: 8 Contact Hours
Item#: VAT08

 

Health Care Management


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Item # VAT08
When available, the Online Course format is included with the hard copy, eBook, or audio book formats!

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Continuous Quality Improvement: Methods and Tools, 2nd Edition

Price: $19.95 
Item # V7255  

Release Date: April 18, 2016

Expiration Date: April 19, 2019

Continuous quality improvement (CQI) is a philosophy that is implemented as an ongoing effort to continuously evaluate and improve a service, process, or product. The process creates an environment in which all members of a team work together to constantly improve quality that may result in incremental changes or abrupt, substantial changes. As patient advocates, recognizing CQI as an important tool to improve function has the potential to reduce wasted resources and improve the work environment for management and staff. CQI is a management philosophy that can be integrated into day-to-day functions at the bedside through a nonbureaucratic educate and support model, rather than a bureaucratic command and control model. This course offers an introduction to CQI components, benefits, and strategies for healthcare providers, from administrators to beside practitioners.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Define continuous quality improvement and the goals of continuous quality improvement.
  • Describe the characteristics of continuous quality improvement in practice.
  • Identify components of continuous quality improvement processes and tools used to quantify outcomes.
  • Identify documentation practices for continuous quality improvement.
  • Identify useful concepts and strategies for continuous quality improvement.
  • Identify the current continuous quality improvement strategies in health care.
  • Discuss best practices in considering continuous quality improvement strategies.
  • Describe the benefits of the continuous quality improvement process.
     
Author Bio(s)

 

Sandra Cegielski, BS, RRT, RCP, is the director of clinical education at Victor Valley College. She also serves as the veterans’ health education coordinator at Loma Linda Veterans Administration Medical Center. Sandra received her BS in business management at the University of Redlands and her AS in respiratory therapy at Victor Valley College.
 
Kevin T. Martin, BVE, RRT, RCP, was the founder of Respiratory Care Educational Consulting Services Inc., which has since merged with Western Schools.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Traci Marin, PhD, MPH, RRT, RPGST, is an assistant research professor, program director, and professor for the Department of Cardiopulmonary Sciences, Schools of Allied Health and Medicine, at Loma Linda University. She is also an adjunct researcher and advisor in the Department of Medicine at Dr. John Shyy’s laboratory at the University of California, San Diego, as well as the founder of Tranquility Community Health. Dr. Marin received a PhD from the University of California, Riverside, in biochemistry and molecular biology; an MPH in epidemiology and biostatistics from Loma Linda University; a bachelor’s degree in emergency medical care from Loma Linda University; and an associate’s degree in respiratory therapy from Victor Valley College. Dr. Marin also serves as a Western Schools respiratory therapy planner.

Ethical Practices with Older Adults, Revised Updated 1st Edition

Price: $19.95 
Item # V7318  

Release Date: February 9, 2018

The number of older adults (age 65 and older) living in the United States is growing rapidly. Almost 60 million older adults were living in the United States in 2016. This number is projected to rise to over 72 million by 2030, when approximately one in five U.S. residents will be age 65 or older. The rapid growth of the older population results from multiple factors including medical advances, life-prolonging technologies, and the aging of the Baby Boom generation (whose members began turning 65 years old in 2011).
 
In coming years, healthcare professionals will face this aging of the population, along with the accompanying health and economic challenges. The purpose of this course is to highlight ethical issues that may confront healthcare and behavioral health professionals working with older adults and their families as these individuals near the end of life. Many of these issues are related to advances in medical technologies that have occurred over the past several decades (and that continue to be developed) and have led to increasingly complex choices. The course will provide background on ethical frameworks and principles used in healthcare settings for guidance in resolving ethical problems. This course will also identify major ethical issues concerning older adults and healthcare decisions and provide a model for addressing ethical dilemmas in healthcare settings.
 
This basic-level course is written for healthcare professionals, including nurses, social workers, mental health counselors, marriage and family therapists, psychologists, occupational and physical therapy practitioners, and respiratory therapists. Other healthcare professionals who work with older adults and on interdisciplinary teams will also find the information presented useful to their practice.

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Identify frameworks and principles commonly used in healthcare settings for resolving ethical problems.
  • Recognize the steps used in resolving ethical dilemmas.
  • Distinguish between capacity and competence.
  • Describe the concept of advance care planning.
  • Identify the hierarchy used in surrogate decision making.
  • Recognize ethical concerns that commonly arise related to the use of medical technologies.
Author Bio(s)

Sherry M. Cummings, PhD, MSW, MA, is an associate dean and professor at the University of Tennessee College of Social Work in Nashville, where she has served on the faculty since 1998. Dr. Cummings holds a doctorate in social work from the University of Georgia, Athens, a master’s degree in social work from the University of Maryland, Baltimore, and a master’s degree in theology from Villanova University, Philadelphia. She has written and published extensively, including journal articles, books, book chapters, and government reports, and has presented papers nationally on the mental health needs of older adults, the impact of those needs on caregivers, and the ethical dilemmas in working with older clients. Dr. Cummings has been actively involved in the development of curriculum materials for gerontological training in graduate social work education and has worked closely with government agencies to promote programs addressing the mental health needs of older adults.

Tennyson Dodd, BS, MTHS, is a graduate of Lipscomb University and Vanderbilt University’s Divinity School, both in Nashville. At Vanderbilt, he earned a master’s degree in theological studies. He is currently pursuing his master’s of science degree in social work at the University of Tennessee in Nashville. During his time at the University of Tennessee, Mr. Dodd has provided psychotherapy services to children in Nashville’s public school system and to students, faculty, and staff at a local university. Mr. Dodd also serves as a research assistant on issues of aging and mental health, housing, and refugees/immigrants.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Kathy Black, PhD, MSW, MSG, MPH, is an associate professor in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of South Florida, Sarasota-Manatee, and is a Hartford Geriatric Social Work Faculty Scholar. Dr. Black obtained her doctorate from the University at Albany-SUNY, a master’s degree in social work and gerontology from the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, and a master’s degree in public health from the University of California, Los Angeles. A fellow of the Gerontological Society of America, Dr. Black has worked with older adults and their families as a nurse, social worker, and geriatric case manager for more than 25 years in acute care and long-term care in home-based and community-based settings. She has also taught courses in ethics and served on the bioethics committee of a large integrated healthcare system.

Venita Lovelace-Chandler, PT, PhD, PCS, is vice-chair and professor in the Department of Physical Therapy, University of North Texas Health Science Center (UNTHSC). She holds a BS in physical therapy from Southwestern Medical School (1971), an MA in college teaching from the University of North Carolina (1976), and a PhD in academic administration/health education from Texas A&M University (1989). Dr. Lovelace-Chandler served as chairperson for the University of Central Arkansas and Chapman University programs in physical therapy and as associate director of the School of Physical Therapy at Texas Woman’s University before joining UNTHSC. She has taught ethics for more than 30 years to professional and post-professional physical therapy students. She has more than 40 years of experience in pediatrics and has twice recertified as a pediatric specialist. Dr. Lovelace-Chandler has served in numerous American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) elected leadership positions, teaches advanced clinical practice courses for APTA, and has published articles and book chapters in pediatrics. She delivered the 2011 Linda Crane Memorial Lecture at APTA’s Combined Sections Meeting in New Orleans, and she won the Commission on Accreditation and Physical Therapy Education Distinguished Service Award in April of 2014.

Ethical Issues and Decision Making for Respiratory Therapists, 2nd Edition

Price: $19.95 
Item # V7304  

Release Date: February 28, 2018

Expiration Date: February 28, 2021

This advanced level course covers the essential ethical principles for respiratory therapists and other healthcare providers. The contents of this course include many ethical issues that respiratory therapists and others may encounter in patient care settings. Additional contents include discussions on professional moral dilemmas, ethical theories (e.g., utilitarianism, deontologic ethics (Kantianism), social contract theory, virtue ethics). Examples are used to illustrate principles that guide ethical decision making. Case studies are used throughout this course to reinforce understanding and learning of the essential ethical principles.

 

California RTs - This course is not approved to fulfill your law & ethics requirement.

New Jersey, Nevada, Ohio & Tennessee RTs - This course fulfills your ethics requirement.

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the study of ethics and the main differences across various schools of ethical theories.
  • Recognize the principles that guide ethical decision making in the health professions as listed in the American Association for Respiratory Care Statement of Ethics and Professional Conduct.
  • Explain the ethical decision-making process within the professional healthcare setting.
  • Discuss approaches to clinical decision making using the SOAP method.
  • Describe professional codes of ethics and the legal implications and repercussions within the guiding rulings of health professions.
Author Bio(s)

Julio F. Turrens, PhD, is professor emeritus of biomedical sciences in the Pat Capps Covey College of Allied Health Professions at the University of South Alabama in Mobile. He received his doctorate degree in chemistry (biochemistry) from the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina. In addition to his career in basic research, he has taught several courses in the areas of bioethics and responsible conduct of research to both undergraduate and graduate students. He designed the senior-level bioethics course, issues in biomedical sciences, that covers vari­ous topics ranging from ethics in society, science, and research integrity. He also designed a graduate-level course on responsible conduct of research. He has given numerous presentations on teaching responsible conduct of research and how to detect scientific fraud. He has served as a book reviewer for the book, On Being a Scientist, edited by the National Academy of Sciences and has also served as a consultant for the European Commission as a forensic expert on issues of research integrity.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Eric J. Loomis, PhD, received his doctorate degree from the University of Texas at Austin in philosophy and his bachelor of arts degree from the University of Wyoming. Dr. Loomis is an associate professor at the University of South Alabama and specializes in the area of metaphysics, early analytic philosophy. He has authored several works including contributing to publications in The Routledge Encyclopedia of the Philosophy of Science and the Journal Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy. Dr. Loomis has also presented papers at the American Educational Research Association on topics such as “Development and Use of the Philosophical Beliefs Questionnaire.

Human Trafficking: Overview for Healthcare Professionals

Price: $19.95 
Item # V7320  

Release Date: February 28, 2018

Expiration Date: February 28, 2021

This intermediate level course for healthcare professionals is an introduction into the complex crime of human trafficking, with a focus on sex and labor trafficking and the common symptoms and conditions that occur in trafficked persons. The course provides insights into the facts surrounding human trafficking and relevant health risks for the trafficked person.

 

Michigan - Fulfills your one-time only human trafficking training requirement.

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe human trafficking, including the types of trafficking and those populations most vulnerable to trafficking.
  • Identify potential trafficked persons using clinical signs and screening tools.
  • Describe components and implementation of trauma-informed care.
  • Review appropriate national organizations and local resources when intervening in human trafficking cases.
Author Bio(s)

Hanni Stoklosa, MD, MPH, is an emergency physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, faculty at Harvard Medical School, and a Human Trafficking and Forced Labor fellow at the T.H. Chan School of Public Health FXB Center for Health and Human Rights at Harvard University in Boston. She is an Institute of Medicine, American Board of Emergency Medicine fellow in health sciences policy and cofounder of HEAL (Health, Education, Advocacy, Linkages) Trafficking, an international network of professionals com­bating human trafficking from a public health perspective. Through her work, she seeks to advance research and policy on the health needs of human trafficking victims globally and locally.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Demetrius James Porche, DNS, PhD, APRN, is professor and dean of Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in New Orleans, Louisiana, School of Nursing. He also holds an appointment in the School of Public Health at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center. Dr. Porche is certified as a clinical specialist in community health nursing and family nurse practitioner. He is currently the chief editor of American Journal of Men’s Health and serves on the editorial board of the Journal for Nurse Practitioners. Dr. Porche is a gubernatorial appointed member of the Louisiana State Board of Nursing. He was inducted as a fellow in the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners and a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing.