Disciplines:

Occupational Therapy

Hours: 12 Contact Hours
Item#: IST12

 

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Professional Issues Bundle


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Just $94.95
Item # IST12
When available, the Online Course format is included with the hard copy, eBook, or audio book formats!

This product includes the following courses:
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Protecting Patient Safety: Preventing Medical Errors, 2nd Edition

Price: $24.95 
Item # I6395  

Release Date: February 27, 2017

Expiration Date: February 27, 2020

The purpose of this basic-level course is to provide licensed practitioners with information concerning the current state of medical errors, the impact of medical errors on the safety of patients, and the importance of establishing and working in a culture of safety. Contributing causes and types of medical errors are reviewed. Strategies to reduce or prevent medical errors and improve patient outcomes are presented. Methods to identify, analyze, and report medical errors are reviewed, populations at risk for medical errors are identified, and patient safety initiatives including education for the public and healthcare professionals are explored.

This course provides information to occupational therapist and occupational therapist assistants that can be readily applied to their practice, no matter what the setting, with the ultimate goal of providing safer care to all patients. Healthcare providers will demonstrate knowledge of medical errors and populations at risk, the impact on patient care outcomes, and the resources and initiatives available to promote a culture of safety as an integral part of healthcare delivery. 

 

AOTA Content Focus - Professional Issues: Supervision; Contemporary Issues & Trends 

0.2 AOTA CEUs are awarded upon successful completion of this course. 

 

Florida OTs & OTAs: Fulfills your entire Medical Error CE requirement.

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Discuss medical errors, the impact of errors on patient safety, the components of medical errors, and the significance of a safety culture.
  • Recognize contributing causes of medical errors, common types of errors, and strategies to reduce errors and improve the outcomes of patients.
  • Differentiate between methods for identifying, analyzing, and reporting medical errors.
  • Identify high-risk populations with increased vulnerability for medical errors.
  • Discuss patient safety initiatives and the benefits of patient safety education for the public and for healthcare professionals.
Author Bio(s)

Joy Parchment, PhD, RN, NE-BC, is an executive nurse leader who is passionate about mentoring new nurse leaders. Dr. Parchment earned a master of science degree in nursing from Anna Maria College and a doctor of philosophy degree in nursing from the University of Central Florida, is boardcertified as a nurse executive from the American Nurses Credentialing Center, and holds a patient safety executive development program certificate from the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. She is a member of several professional nursing organizations and international associations and is the current president of the Central Florida Organization of Nurse Executives. Her research interests include nursing workforce trends, workplace bullying, and the work environment of nurse leaders. She is a national conference presenter and is the recipient of several small research grants for her work in the field of workplace bullying. Using her expertise drawn from nursing administration, academia, and ambulatory care, Dr. Parchment guides interprofessional teams to successfully implement quality and safety improvement initiatives.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Christa Carpenter, RN, Esq., is a registered nurse and healthcare attorney. She practices healthcare law in Florida with a particular emphasis and specialty in patient safety issues.

Ethics Issues and Decision Making in Occupational Therapy, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # I6399  

Release Date: January 2, 2018

Expiration Date: January 2, 2021

The purpose of this basic level course is to provide OTs and OTAs with an introduction to the study of ethical behavior and action as it is applied to occupational therapy practice, education, and research. It is designed to facilitate learning and using the ethical principles required to foster moral reasoning and to practice ethical decision making in occupational therapy. Specific objectives include defining terms used in discussing ethics, describing the principles and values of ethics organized into the Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics, relating occupational therapy ethics to stakeholders in society, explaining a decision-making process for analyzing ethics issues, and discussing sample case studies. The case studies in this course are based on issues brought to the attention of the AOTA Ethics Commission (EC) members. All names and situations used in the case studies have been changed to avoid identifying any person or facility.

 

Georgia, Illinois, North Carolina, Ohio, Tennessee & Utah OTs & OTAs - Fulfills your Ethics requirement.

AOTA Content Focus - Professional Issues: Legal, Legislative & Regulatory Issues

0.3 AOTA CEUs are awarded upon successful completion of this course.

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Recognize ethics terms, theories, principles, and sources of ethical issues.
  • Identify ethics principles used in the American Occupational Therapy Association “Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics” and the procedures used to enforce them.
  • Compare and contrast stakeholders and their role in ethical decision making.
  • Apply a decision-making process to resolve ethical questions and identify types of ethics issues occurring in occupational therapy practice.
Author Bio(s)

Kathlyn L. Reed, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, MLIS, is an associate professor emeritus in the School of Occupational Therapy, Texas Woman’s University, where she has taught since 1997. Dr. Reed received her bachelor’s degree in occu­pational therapy from the University of Kansas, a master’s in occupational therapy from Western Michigan University, a master’s in library studies and information from the University of Oklahoma, and a doctorate in special educa­tion from the University of Washington in Seattle. She has published textbooks and peer-reviewed articles, and has presented at local, state, national, and international conferences. Dr. Reed is a Fellow of the American Occupational Therapy Association, has presented the Eleanor Clarke Slagle lecture, and has received the Award of Merit from the American Occupational Therapy Association. In addition, she has received the Roster of Merit and Distinguished Service Awards from the Texas Occupational Therapy Association. From 2007 to 2010, Dr. Reed served as Chairperson of the American Occupational Therapy Association Ethics Commission.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Elizabeth D. DeIuliis, OTD, OTR/L, attended Duquesne University and graduated with a master’s degree in occupational therapy in 2004. In December of 2009, she completed her doctorate of occupational therapy degree at Chatham University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Her clinical experience is broad, yet primarily physical disabilities – working in diverse hospital settings such as acute-care, transitional care, and hospital-based outpatient. She has wide-ranging experience, working within the adult to geriatric life span with a variety of medical patient populations, including, but not limited to, orthopedics, oncology, neurology, and cardiopulmonary. Dr. DeIuliis is the assistant department chair and academic fieldwork coordinator at Duquesne University, an entry-level doctorate program. Dr. DeIuliis was awarded the 2014 Creative Teaching Award through Duquesne University’s Center for Teaching Excellence, the 2015 Dean’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, the 2016 University Student Learning Outcome Assessment Award, and the 2017 Academic Educator of the Year via the Pennsylvania Occupational Therapy Association. Dr. DeIuliis is also the sole author of the new textbook, Professionalism Across Occupational Practice, published by Slack, Incorporated.

Leadership Practices in Health Professions

Price: $24.95 
Item # I6391  

Release Date: March 28, 2017

Expiration Date: March 28, 2020

Leadership is a complex topic that is best deconstructed to understand its parts and empower application. This basic-level course is designed to define leadership theories and models that frame current leadership practices. An exploration of various styles of leadership will enable learners to reflect on their own leadership practices and/or create a leadership plan for the application of new skills. The combination of leadership and mentorship education will enhance current healthcare practice to secure the future of the profession for the well-being of the clients served. In occupational and physical therapy curricula, leadership is addressed − but just the tip of the iceberg. Students may be exposed to learning and teaching styles, or leadership training may be offered in the workplace and perhaps through mentorship opportunities. These opportunities may lack proper definition of leadership theories and models that would enable the learner to be successful in leadership roles.

 

 

AOTA Content Focus - Professional Issues: Contemporary Issues and Trends; Professional Development and Continuing Competence 

0.2 AOTA CEUs are awarded upon successful completion of this course

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Define various leadership theories.
  • Explain various leadership models and styles.
  • Describe how leadership is related to management and mentorship.
Author Bio(s)

 

Jessica J. Bolduc, DrOT, MSOTR/L, received her master’s degree from the University of New England in 2005 and her doctorate in 2013 from Nova Southeastern University. Her clinical experience spans the continuum of care, including acute care, inpatient rehabilitation, outpatient rehabilitation, skilled nursing, and home health. Dr. Bolduc is an adjunct professor at the University of New England, where she teaches courses on physical dysfunction, research, and scholarly inquiry. She served as vice president of the Vermont Occupational Therapy Association for 2 years and as president for 3 years. She is currently active with the Maine Occupational Therapy Association and will serve as president-elect starting in July. Dr. Bolduc was selected to join the first cohort of the Emerging Leaders Development Program of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) and was subsequently appointed to the AOTA’s Emerging Leaders Development Committee and Volunteer Leadership Development Committee. She has received three service commendations from the AOTA, as well as the Young Alumni Award from the University of New England and the Alpha Eta Richard E. Davis Service Award from Nova Southeastern University. She was inducted into the Nu Sigma Upsilon Chapter of the Alpha Eta Society for scholarly accomplishments at Nova Southeastern University. Dr. Bolduc is licensed in occupational therapy in four states and is a certified clinical fieldwork educator. She has published in OT Practice and The Internet Journal of Allied Health Sciences and Practice and has written chapters in Gerontology for the HealthCare Practitioner and Occupational Therapy Essentials for Clinical Competence. She has presented at national and state occupational therapy conferences. In addition to her ongoing work as a staff occupational therapist, Dr. Bolduc serves as the occupational therapy planner for Western Schools, an AOTA-approved provider of continuing education.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Nancy MacRae, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA, is currently an associate professor in the Occupational Therapy Department of the University of New England, where she has taught for 27 years. She is a past director of that department and a past president of the Maine Occupational Therapy Association. In addition, she has held numerous leadership positions within the university community, including chair of the University Faculty Assembly and cochair of the Reappointment, Promotion and Tenure Committee, and has played an active role in the university’s stellar interprofessional program. Scholarship efforts include writing on sexuality and aging and interprofessional education and practice; coediting a basic occupational therapy text, now in its third edition; and serving on the editorial board of the journal WORK since its inception.

Home Health Therapy: Using OASIS

Price: $29.95 
Item # I6404  

Release Date: May 16, 2017

Expiration Date: May 16, 2020

Home health care is the fastest growing industry in the United States based upon the projection period of 2014 to 2024. The demand and competition for licensed rehabilitation therapists to work in home health care is, and will be, great. Therapists currently working in or planning to work in home health agencies must have an understanding of the significance of process and outcomes measurement. The Outcome and ASsessment Information Set (OASIS) is a specific assessment and outcomes measurement instrument that consists of 111 items or questions and measures patient data at various times during the patient’s stay in home care. Mandated by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, OASIS data must be collected on patients with Medicare and Medicaid at various times during a patient’s stay in home care. Therapists must be aware of the time sensitive and accuracy requirements related to documentation, OASIS updates, and the level of compliance and denials their agency experiences. Feedback related to documentation compliance and any denials will help therapists to refine and improve utilization of the tool for both improved patient outcomes and optimum reimbursement. The purpose of this basic-level course is to provide home healthcare physical and occupational therapists  and speech language pathologists  with the information they need to understand the significance and importance of effectively using the OASIS instrument in order to deliver comprehensive, compassionate, patient-focused, and cost-sensitive skilled services in the home environment. The home health therapist will be able to use the OASIS information provided in this course to create a basis for the plan of care, to measure the patient’s progress in meeting the established home healthcare goals, and to meet the regulatory requirements for quality reporting and reimbursement. By completing this course, therapists new to the home health setting will gain knowledge needed to begin working with the OASIS tool as part of an orientation in delivering certified home health therapy and overall care. The experienced home health therapist will find opportunities to review, reinforce, revise, and refine or expand their working knowledge of the OASIS requirements and to grow in understanding the professional implications of practicing in this complex and challenging healthcare setting. This course focuses on OASIS-C2, the most recent update to OASIS, which went into effect January 1, 2017.

 

 

AOTA Content Focus - Occupational Therapy Process: Evaluation; Professional Issues; Legal, Legislative, Regulatory & Reimbursement Issues
 
0.3 AOTA CEUs are awarded upon successful completion of this course.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Explain the evolution and purposes of the OASIS instrument.
  • Describe the OASIS instrument.
  • Describe the rules about when, by whom, and how the OASIS instrument is completed.
  • Explain when and how to use Chapter 3 of the OASIS-C2 Guidance Manual.
  • Identify each of the items within the OASIS-C2 dataset.
Author Bio(s)

 

Mary Curry Narayan, MSN, RN, HHCNS-BC, COS-C, CTN-A, is a Clinical Nurse Specialist in home health nursing and is certified as a specialist in the Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS) and in transcultural nursing. Mary currently provides consultation education and quality services to home health agencies. She serves on the Editorial Board of Home Healthcare Now and has published multiple articles and book chapters on enhancing home health nursing practice. She served on the American Nurses Association’s 2014 Task Force for Home Health Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice and as the Clinical Editor of the Visiting Nurse Associations of America’s Clinical Procedure Manual.

Arlynn Hansell, PT, HCS-D, HCS-H, HCS-O, COS-C, is a physical therapist in the home health field. She is a certified specialist in the Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS), as well as ICD-10 diagnostic coding. Arlynn currently provides coding and OASIS review to home health and hospice agencies. She is on the Board of Medical Specialty Coding and Compliance (BMSC), and was the recent vice president of the Home Health Section of American Physical Therapy Association (APTA). She has written many articles and several presentations for various publications and organizations regarding therapy practice, coding, and OASIS completion.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Kathleen Ruane, MS, RN, CPHQ, COS-C, has over 25 years of experience in community health care, including progressive management experience leading home health quality improvement and clinical programs. She currently is the Director of Quality and Compliance at Lahey Health at Home based in Massachusetts. Her areas of expertise include data analysis and the design and implementation of strategies to improve patient satisfaction
and quality outcomes.

Chronic Illness and Depression

Price: $24.95 
Item # I6386  

Release Date: November 28, 2017

Expiration Date: November 28, 2020

This  basic-level course addresses the knowledge gap by providing rehabilitation  professionals with an overview of the co-occurrence of depression and chronic conditions and identifying challenges in screening and referring adults with chronic conditions and depression. It provides explanations for potential causes of and contributing factors to depression unique to individuals with chronic medical conditions. Although individuals with chronic conditions are at increased risk for depression, this course also explores factors that may enhance such individuals’ well-being and diminish the likelihood of depression.

 

AOTA Content Focus - Domain of OT: Client Factor; OT Process: Evaluation

0.2 AOTA CEUs are awarded upon successful completion of this course.

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the co-occurrence of depression and chronic illness.
  • Recognize the symptoms of depression and appropriate assessment tools to screen for depression.
  • Identify common causes and contributing risk and protective factors for depression in individuals in medical populations.
  • Describe treatment approaches for depression in individuals with chronic illness.
  • Describe the implications of chronic illness and depression on physical and occupational therapy practice.
Author Bio(s)
Alexandra L. Terrill, PhD, received her PhD in clinical psychology from Washington State University, with specialized training in clinical health psychology. She also completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Washington in rehabilitation psychology. During her fellowship, she was involved in research on aging with physical disabilities associated with chronic conditions. Dr. Terrill is currently a faculty member at the University of Utah, Division of Occupational Therapy. Her research encompasses three basic areas: (1) stress, coping/adjustment, and chronic health conditions; (2) using strengths-based interventions (positive psychology); and (3) aging. Her broad goal is to improve our understanding of how social, psychological, and biological processes interact to affect individuals aging with a chronic condition and develop interventions that enhance productivity and quality of life from early to late adulthood. She is particularly interested in investigating and enhancing protective factors involved in the prevention of and adjustment to chronic medical conditions and associated disability.
 
Brandon Abbs, PhD, earned his PhD in psychology from the University of Iowa and a BA in psychology from the University of Maryland, College Park. He was most recently a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and the Department of Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. During this fellowship, he was involved in research projects on the relationship between maternal infection during pregnancy and a child’s risk for schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, and early cognitive decline. He studied this relationship using neuroimaging and neuropsychology. He is currently a senior medical writer for a biotechnology company in Boston, where he composes documents needed to conduct clinical trials in oncology and to inform people about specific cancer types and available treatments.
 
Julie Heinrichs, PT, DPT, earned her BA in English and master’s in Physical Therapy from Marquette University in Milwaukee and a Doctor of Physical Therapy from the MGH Institute of Health Professions in Boston. She has over a decade of experience working with adults in a variety of inpatient and outpatient settings. Because of her experience in working with patients with mental health challenges, she has developed a profes­sional interest in the interactions between mental and physical health. She is currently the Physical Therapy Education Planner at Western Schools.
Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

John G. Cagle, PhD, MSW, is an assistant professor at the University of Maryland School of Social Work in Baltimore. His work focuses on the psychosocial dimensions of family caregiving and coping with life-threatening illness. As a clinician-researcher, his scholarship is informed by nearly a decade of experience as a hospice social worker. His scholarship includes work on the application of cognitive-behavioral treatment approaches with families coping with serious, life-threatening illness. His research has also included clinical trials to assess for and address barriers to pain management in hospice care, efforts to improve palliative care in long-term care settings, and an evaluation of caregiving at the end of life. His work has been supported by the John A. Hartford Foundation, the National Palliative Care Research Center, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the National Institutes of Health.

Jessica J. Bolduc, DrOT, MSOTR/L, received her master’s degree from the University of New England in 2005 and her doctorate in 2013 from Nova Southeastern University. Her clinical experience spans the continuum of care, including acute care, inpatient rehabilitation, outpatient rehabilitation, skilled nursing, and home health. Dr. Bolduc has served as adjunct professor in the occupational therapy department at the University of New England and the University of Southern Maine, where she taught courses on physical dysfunction. She served as vice president of the Vermont Occupational Therapy Association for two years and as president for three years. She is currently active with the Maine Occupational Therapy Association as President-Elect. Dr. Bolduc is licensed in occupational therapy in four states and is a certified clinical fieldwork educator. She has published in OT Practice, The Internet Journal of Allied Health, Sciences and Practice, and has written textbook chapters in Gerontology for The HealthCare Practitioner and Occupational Therapy Essentials for Clinical Competence. She has presented at national and state occupational therapy conferences. In addition to her ongoing work as a staff occupational therapist, Dr. Bolduc serves as the Occupational Therapy Planner at Western Schools, an AOTA-approved provider of continuing education.

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