Disciplines: Occupational Therapy
Hours: 15 Contact Hours
Item#: IAT15

 

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Item # IAT15
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Introduction to Wheeled Mobility: Considerations in Occupational and Physical Therapy Practice

Price: $29.95 
Item # I6374  

Release Date: August 16, 2016

Expiration Date: August 16, 2019

This course is designed to guide the rehabilitation professionals in the selection of the most appropriate intervention to provide dependent or independent mobility to the clients they serve. Many clients with physical limitations have inefficient or no independent mobility. Although some clients require a dependent mobility base that is pushed by a caregiver, many other clients require a mobility base to optimize their functional mobility. Occupational and physical therapists often receive little education and training in the area of wheeled mobility. Because such instruction is usually limited, it fails to adequately prepare an occupational or physical therapist for this specialty area of practice and additional training is required.

This intermediate-level course comprehensively presents wheeled mobility in a practice-specific context. Specifically, the course addresses mobility assessment, wheeled mobility categories, and power mobility considerations. Most practitioners will work with clients who need a mobility intervention, whether this includes evaluating the client, recommending a specific wheelchair, or training mobility skills. This course provides the information and resources required to prepare practitioners to meet these needs.

 

AOTA Content Focus - OT Process: Evaluation, Intervention, and Outcomes

 

 

0.3 AOTA CEUs are awarded upon successful completion of this course.

 

 

 

Disclosures

 

  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
  • Michelle Lange has disclosed that she makes presentations on behalf of manufacturers of seating and mobility equipment, including Stealth Products, and consults on the development of webinar and live educational content with several organizations, including NRRTS, RESNA, and Numotion. Western Schools ensures that this content is free from bias and commercial influence through its peer review process.

 

Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the steps in a wheeled mobility assessment. 
  • Identify categories of wheeled mobility equipment.
  • Explain how to determine and develop readiness for power wheelchair use.
  • List a variety of power wheelchair driving methods with clinical indicators for each.
  • Describe power wheelchair advanced features and applications.
Author Bio(s)
Michelle L. Lange, OTR/L, ABDA, ATP/SMS, is an occupational therapist with more than 25 years of experience in the area of assistive technology. She is the former clinical director of the assistive technology clinics of Children’s Hospital Colorado. Now in private practice, Ms. Lange evaluates and treats children and adults with a variety of diagnoses and provides consultation and education in the areas of wheelchair seating and mobility, accessibility, assistive technology access, mounting, interfacing, and electronic aids to daily living. She is a well-respected lecturer who presents live educational programs and webinars nationally and internationally, and has authored four book chapters and nearly 200 articles. Ms. Lange is the editor of Fundamentals in Assistive Technology, 4th ed., and clinical editor of Directions magazine, a publication of the National Registry of Rehabilitation Technology Suppliers (NRRTS). She is on the teaching faculty of the Rehabilitation Engineering and  Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA). A past member of both the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center (RERC) on the Wheeled Mobility Advisory Board and current member of the Clinician’s Task Force, Ms. Lange is a certified Assistive Technology Professional (ATP), certified Seating and Mobility Specialist (SMS) and is a Senior Disability Analyst of the American Board of Disability Analysts (ABDA).
Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Kerri Morgan, PhD, OTR/L, ATP, is an occupational therapist and a certified assistive technology professional. Dr. Morgan completed both a master’s degree in occupational therapy and her PhD in movement science at Washington University in St. Louis, MO. She currently works in Washington University’s Program in Occupational Therapy, where she teaches a graduate-level class on assistive technology and conducts research on the movement patterns of people with disabilities, with the goal of guiding community-based and person-based interventions that improve the participation of people with lower-limb mobility impairments. In addition to assisting in the development of a wheelchair seating clinic, Dr. Morgan has helped develop and test standardized measures that assess a person’s quality of participation in major life activities and the environmental facilitators and barriers impacting participation. She also helped create a community-based program housed in a local independent-living center that provides services for people with disabilities (such as assistive technology education and delivery programs). An avid wheelchair athlete, Dr. Morgan has been a member of both the U.S. National Quad Rugby Team and the U.S. Paralympic Track team. 

Barbara Crume, PT, ATP, works full time in the seating clinic at CarePartners Health Services in Asheville, NC. She has more than 32 years of experience providing wheelchair positioning services for clients of all ages and diagnoses. She is a guest lecturer for PT and PTA students from local universities and colleges, teaching an introductory seating and wheeled mobility course. This full-day course includes client evaluation with mat assessment, pressure mapping, and comparison of seating systems and mobility devices, as well as documentation and funding guidelines for complex rehabilitation technology. Ms. Crume presents courses at national and international conferences, as well as webinars on many topics related to seating and wheeled mobility.

Dysphagia in Older Adults: Current Evaluation and Treatment Approaches

Price: $39.95 
Item # I6372  

Release Date: March 22, 2016

Expiration Date: March 22, 2019

Dysphagia, a disorder of eating and swallowing is a rapidly emerging problem within medical, international and national public healthcare institutions. Healthcare practitioners encounter clients distraught over the inability to eat and swallow. These clients may experience anxiety in coughing and choking when attempting to take a sip of fluid, eat a piece of bread, or ingest medication. The clients may indeed be at risk for aspiration, possibly leading to pneumonia, as well as being at higher risk for dehydration and malnutrition, leading to debilitation and illness. Families are frequently at a loss for how to help their loved one eat to “gain weight” and “recover” from an illness.

In the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, dysphagia was linked with acute and chronic medical, pulmonary, and neurologic disorders. Sequelae of dysphagia, such as malnutrition and debilitation, take a toll on individuals’ health and related health care costs. Dysphagia is pervasive in the adult and aging populations, and associated with a wide variety of diseases and disorders. Clients with dysphagia face significant health and psychosocial challenges inherent in a swallowing disorder. Occupational therapists are in a unique position to intervene with this population. Clients with dysphagia receive care at home, in clinics and hospitals, and in rehabilitation or extended care facilities. 

This intermediate-level course is designed to provide occupational therapy practitioners with the most current information and evidence from best practice to advance holistic treatment addressing the needs of their clients with dysphagia. Additionally, this course presents information on several validated screening and outcome measures for early detection of signs and symptoms, and for documentation of client improvements. By increasing their knowledge of the characteristics of swallowing disorders, their use of clinical and/or instrumental assessments and their ability to implement a holistic treatment approach, clinicians can improve the quality of life for clients with dysphagia and their families.

 

AOTA Content Focus - Occupational Therapy Process: Evaluation, Intervention, Outcomes

 

 

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content
  • There are no prerequisites for this course
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the prevalence, causes, and consequences of dysphagia
  • Describe the anatomic, sensory, and motor components of normal swallowing
  • Identify neurologic, medical, and age-related characteristics of dysphagia
  • Describe the clinical and functional assessment of dysphagia
  • Identify occupational therapy approaches to treating clients who have dysphagia
  • Identify tools used to measure treatment outcomes for dysphagia
Author Bio(s)

 

Marcia Cox, MHS, OTR/L, SCFES, is a clinical specialist in outpatient neurorehabilitation and feeding, eating, and swallowing at Kettering Medical Center and the NeuroRehab & Balance Center, both in Kettering, Ohio. Her career has focused on program development and education of occupational therapists in the areas of feeding, eating, and swallowing and in stroke rehabilitation. She received a bachelor of science degree in occupational therapy from the University of Kansas in 1972 and a master’s degree in health science from the University of Indianapolis in 2001. Ms. Cox has served on panels for both the development and revision of the American Occupational Therapy Association Board for Advanced and Specialty Certification (BASC) Feeding, Eating and Swallowing Specialty Certification. She has served as a reviewer for candidates for the Feeding, Eating and Swallowing specialty certification. Ms. Cox has been a guest lecturer and adjunct faculty member for occupational therapy programs in Ohio and Indiana in the area of feeding, eating, and swallowing.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Pamela Roberts, PhD, MSHA, OTR/L, SCFES, FAOTA, CPHQ, FNAP, is the director and a professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation and neuropsychology and the director of academics and physician informatics at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, California. She is also the senior director for quality, outcomes, and research at the California Rehabilitation Institute. Dr. Roberts earned her occupational therapy degree at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri; her master of science degree in health administration from California State University at Northridge; and her PhD in health sciences from Touro University. During the course of her career, Dr. Roberts has worked throughout the continuum of care as a clinician, administrator, educator, and researcher. Dr. Roberts was involved in the development of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) specialty certification program, including receiving her AOTA specialty certification in Feeding, Eating and Swallowing. She also has certification in Advanced Practice in Swallowing through the California Board of Occupational Therapy. Dr. Roberts has also been an author on a number of dysphagia publications. Dr. Roberts’s research and scholarship include serving as principal investigator and coinvestigator on a variety of research projects, and she has provided numerous workshops and consultations on rehabilitation, dysphagia, informatics, and health services research topics regionally, nationally, and internationally.

Promoting Healthy Aging for the Older Adult

Price: $49.95 
Item # I6410  

Release Date: July 18, 2017

Expiration Date: July 18, 2020

The demographic changes of the United States have created an urgent need for more healthcare professionals educated in the care of older adults. The U.S. Census Bureau projects that by the year 2050, 89 million Americans will be 65 years of age or older. In fact, 20% of older adults will represent the U.S. population by 2030.  According to the AOA, adults aged 65 and older will outnumber children 5 years of age and younger in the years to come. This rapidly aging population is challenging the health care system to come up with ways to meet the needs of older adults and set the stage for developing a healthier society.

This basic-level course is designed to assist healthcare professionals in encouraging, teaching, and guiding older adults to actively practice healthy lifestyles. This course allows healthcare professionals that work with older adults to gain additional knowledge in geriatrics and be able to provide satisfactory care to improve outcomes for older adults. Healthcare professionals will be able to recognize the needs of older adult clients and develop person-centered plans to support optimal living and promote healthy aging. Additionally, this course will set the stage for developing a healthier society for all to age well and successfully.

 

This course is an extract of, and should not be taken in conjunction with, I6406 - Healthy Aging, 2nd Edition.

 

 

AOTA Content Focus - Occupational Therapy Process: Evaluation, Intervention, Outcomes 

0.5 AOTA CEUs are awarded upon successful completion of this course.

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Identify key concepts for healthy living.
  • Identify the key attributes for supporting the older adult to stay healthy.
  • Identify essential components of providing high-quality health care for older adults.
Author Bio(s)

 

Fayron Epps, PhD, RN, has been a registered nurse for 16 years. She recently completed her postdoctoral fellowship with the National Hartford Center of Gerontological Nursing Excellence. She is currently employed as an Assistant Professor at Georgia State University. Additionally, Dr. Epps serves as adjunct faculty with the Louisiana State University Life Course and Aging Center. She is an active member with numerous professional organizations, including the Gerontological Society of America, National Gerontological Nurses Association, and International Dementia Scholars Collaborative. Most recently she has been elected to the Board of Directors for Louisiana Enhancing Aging with Dignity through Empowerment and Respect (LEADER).

Dr. Epps’ career goal as a nurse scholar is to promote health across the life span by increasing the quality of life for family caregivers and recognizing the multidimensional complexities of supporting older adults through nursing research, education, and service. Her program of research involves evidence-based practices for promoting quality of life for persons with dementia and their family caregivers. Dr. Epps has presented her research at local, regional, and national conferences. In addition, she has published in the Journal of Religion, Spirituality & Aging, Geriatric Nursing, Journal of Gerontological Nursing, Research in Gerontological Nursing, and Journal of Research Practice.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Karen Hurka-Richardson, ANP-BC, MSN, BSN, RN, is a nurse practitioner working in geriatrics at a continuing care retirement community in Chapel Hill, NC. She received a Master of Science in Nursing in the Adult Nurse Practitioner Program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2008. She completed her Bachelor of Science in nursing at Johns Hopkins University in 2003. She has experience working in neurosurgery, psychiatry, utilization review, hospice, HIV/AIDS, and intensive care.

Introduction to Wheelchair Seating and Positioning: Considerations in Occupational & Physical Therapy Practice

Price: $29.95 
Item # I6370  

Expiration Date: February 3, 2019

This course provides the occupational and physical therapy practitioner with a broad overview of the assessment and provision of wheelchair seating. This course is written at a basic-to-intermediate level for the occupational or physical therapist that has little or no experience in this specialized practice area. Many people require the use of a wheelchair for dependent or independent mobility, and each wheelchair provides some form of seating. Wheelchair seating directly affects a client’s position which, in turn, affects function for all of that person’s daily tasks.  It is essential that occupational and physical therapists be able to competently participate as a member of the team in determining the optimal seating and wheeled mobility interventions for a particular client. Common diagnoses that a client using a wheelchair may have include cerebral palsy, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, multiple sclerosis, and muscular dystrophies. 

This course systematically reviews wheelchair seating considerations, beginning with assessment. A key part of seating assessment is the mat examination, which helps determine where and at what angles a client needs postural support for optimal alignment, pressure distribution and relief to prevent the development of pressure ulcers. Body positioning is critical; the body should be positioned to support the task that needs to be accomplished. Clients often must find both a position of rest and a position suitable for functional or task performance within the same seating system. The course explores available seating system categories and materials and describes specific seating challenges, including their causes, goals, and suggested interventions.

AOTA Content Focus - Occupational Therapy Process: Evaluation, Assessment, Intervention

 

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  •  All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
  • Michelle Lange has disclosed that she makes presentations on behalf of manufacturers of seating and mobility equipment, including Stealth Products, and consults on the development of webinar and live educational content with several organizations, including NRRTS, RESNA, and Numotion. Western Schools ensures that this content is free from bias and commercial influence through its peer review process.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the steps in a seating assessment
  • Identify types of seating systems
  • Describe the clinical considerations in selecting seating systems
  • List common positioning challenges and strategies for seated mobility
  • Describe specific applications for seated mobility
Author Bio(s)

Michelle L. Lange, OTR/L, ABDA, ATP/SMS, is an occupational therapist with more than 25 years of experience in the area of assistive technology. She is the former clinical director of the assistive technology clinics of Children’s Hospital Colorado. Now in private practice, Ms. Lange evaluates and treats children and adults with a variety of diagnoses and provides consultation and education in the areas of wheelchair seating and mobility, accessibility, assistive technology access, mounting, interfacing, and electronic aids to daily living. She is a well-respected lecturer who presents live educational programs and webinars nationally and internationally, and has authored four book chapters and nearly 200 articles. Ms. Lange is the editor of Fundamentals in Assistive Technology, 4th ed., and clinical editor of Directions magazine, a publication of the National Registry of Rehabilitation Technology Suppliers (NRRTS). She is on the teaching faculty of the Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA). A past member of both the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center (RERC) on the Wheeled Mobility Advisory Board and current member of the Clinician’s Task Force, Ms. Lange is a certified Assistive Technology Professional (ATP), certified Seating and Mobility Specialist (SMS) and is a Senior Disability Analyst of the American Board of Disability Analysts (ABDA).

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Kerri Morgan, PhD, OTR/L, ATP, is an occupational therapist and a certified assistive technology professional. Dr. Morgan completed both a master’s degree in occupational therapy and her PhD in movement science at Washington University in St. Louis, MO. She currently works in Washington University’s Program in Occupational Therapy, where she teaches a graduate-level class on assistive technology and conducts research on the movement patterns of people with disabilities, with the goal of guiding community-based and person-based interventions that improve the participation of people with lower-limb mobility impairments. In addition to assisting in the development of a wheelchair seating clinic, Dr. Morgan has helped develop and test standardized measures that assess a person’s quality of participation in major life activities and the environmental facilitators and barriers impacting participation. She also helped create a community-based program housed in a local independent-living center that provides services for people with disabilities (such as assistive technology education and delivery programs). An avid wheelchair athlete, Dr. Morgan has been a member of both the U.S. National Quad Rugby Team and the U.S. Paralympic Track team.

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