Disciplines: Occupational Therapy
Hours: 15 Contact Hours
Item#: IBT15

 

Sign up for the Western Schools 365 Online Membership

15-Hour OT Bundle


Reg. Prices
Just $104.95
Item # IBT15
When available, the Online Course format is included with the hard copy, eBook, or audio book formats!

This product includes the following courses:
Click on the title to see more and read the course

Dysphagia in Older Adults: Current Evaluation and Treatment Approaches

Price: $39.95 
Item # I6372  

Release Date: March 22, 2016

Expiration Date: March 22, 2019

Dysphagia, a disorder of eating and swallowing is a rapidly emerging problem within medical, international and national public healthcare institutions. Healthcare practitioners encounter clients distraught over the inability to eat and swallow. These clients may experience anxiety in coughing and choking when attempting to take a sip of fluid, eat a piece of bread, or ingest medication. The clients may indeed be at risk for aspiration, possibly leading to pneumonia, as well as being at higher risk for dehydration and malnutrition, leading to debilitation and illness. Families are frequently at a loss for how to help their loved one eat to “gain weight” and “recover” from an illness.

In the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, dysphagia was linked with acute and chronic medical, pulmonary, and neurologic disorders. Sequelae of dysphagia, such as malnutrition and debilitation, take a toll on individuals’ health and related health care costs. Dysphagia is pervasive in the adult and aging populations, and associated with a wide variety of diseases and disorders. Clients with dysphagia face significant health and psychosocial challenges inherent in a swallowing disorder. Occupational therapists are in a unique position to intervene with this population. Clients with dysphagia receive care at home, in clinics and hospitals, and in rehabilitation or extended care facilities. 

This intermediate-level course is designed to provide occupational therapy practitioners with the most current information and evidence from best practice to advance holistic treatment addressing the needs of their clients with dysphagia. Additionally, this course presents information on several validated screening and outcome measures for early detection of signs and symptoms, and for documentation of client improvements. By increasing their knowledge of the characteristics of swallowing disorders, their use of clinical and/or instrumental assessments and their ability to implement a holistic treatment approach, clinicians can improve the quality of life for clients with dysphagia and their families.

 

AOTA Content Focus - Occupational Therapy Process: Evaluation, Intervention, Outcomes

 

 

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content
  • There are no prerequisites for this course
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the prevalence, causes, and consequences of dysphagia
  • Describe the anatomic, sensory, and motor components of normal swallowing
  • Identify neurologic, medical, and age-related characteristics of dysphagia
  • Describe the clinical and functional assessment of dysphagia
  • Identify occupational therapy approaches to treating clients who have dysphagia
  • Identify tools used to measure treatment outcomes for dysphagia
Author Bio(s)

 

Marcia Cox, MHS, OTR/L, SCFES, is a clinical specialist in outpatient neurorehabilitation and feeding, eating, and swallowing at Kettering Medical Center and the NeuroRehab & Balance Center, both in Kettering, Ohio. Her career has focused on program development and education of occupational therapists in the areas of feeding, eating, and swallowing and in stroke rehabilitation. She received a bachelor of science degree in occupational therapy from the University of Kansas in 1972 and a master’s degree in health science from the University of Indianapolis in 2001. Ms. Cox has served on panels for both the development and revision of the American Occupational Therapy Association Board for Advanced and Specialty Certification (BASC) Feeding, Eating and Swallowing Specialty Certification. She has served as a reviewer for candidates for the Feeding, Eating and Swallowing specialty certification. Ms. Cox has been a guest lecturer and adjunct faculty member for occupational therapy programs in Ohio and Indiana in the area of feeding, eating, and swallowing.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Pamela Roberts, PhD, MSHA, OTR/L, SCFES, FAOTA, CPHQ, FNAP, is the director and a professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation and neuropsychology and the director of academics and physician informatics at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, California. She is also the senior director for quality, outcomes, and research at the California Rehabilitation Institute. Dr. Roberts earned her occupational therapy degree at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri; her master of science degree in health administration from California State University at Northridge; and her PhD in health sciences from Touro University. During the course of her career, Dr. Roberts has worked throughout the continuum of care as a clinician, administrator, educator, and researcher. Dr. Roberts was involved in the development of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) specialty certification program, including receiving her AOTA specialty certification in Feeding, Eating and Swallowing. She also has certification in Advanced Practice in Swallowing through the California Board of Occupational Therapy. Dr. Roberts has also been an author on a number of dysphagia publications. Dr. Roberts’s research and scholarship include serving as principal investigator and coinvestigator on a variety of research projects, and she has provided numerous workshops and consultations on rehabilitation, dysphagia, informatics, and health services research topics regionally, nationally, and internationally.

Breast Cancer: The Role of Occupational Therapists

Price: $29.95 
Item # I6375  

Release Date - November 29, 2016

Expiration Date: November 29, 2019

There are various effective therapeutic approaches that can be utilized with breast cancer survivors. Due to the physical and psychological effects of these treatments, there is a need for a therapeutic approach that focuses on the effect that this experience has on one’s psychosocial function and overall occupational performance. Cancer diagnosis and treatment can impose multiple degrees of physical and psychological strain on an individual. Physical deficits, such as lack of upper-body function related to postoperative pain, lymphedema, and decreased sensation and range of motion are common sequale after treatment for breast cancer. The repercussions associated with chemotherapy, radiation, and/or surgery can result in the inability to engage in meaningful occupations, return to work, or perform prior social roles and responsibilities adequately. Further, such repercussions can have a profound impact on one’s economic status and level of social functioning, which affects their overall occupational performance.

This intermediate course provides a critical review of current evidence to ensure occupational therapy practitioners are adequately prepared to provide the best care possible within the breast cancer population. Upon fulfilling the course objectives, practitioners will be prepared to develop an evidence-based approach to the evaluation and treatment of individuals with breast cancer throughout the pre-operative, post-operative and community phases of recovery.

AOTA Content Focus - Domain of OT: Client Factors;  Occupational Therapy Process: Evaluation & Intervention

 

 

0.3 AOTA CEUs are awarded upon successful completion of this course.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the prevalence, incidence, and impact of different types of breast cancer on health and wellness.
  • Identify common nonsurgical and surgical treatments for breast cancer and postsurgical presentations.
  • Explain lymphedema and its impact on recovery following breast cancer treatment.
  • Discuss the unique role of the occupational therapy practitioner in working with  individuals with breast cancer.
  • Describe the occupational therapy evaluation process for clients with breast cancer.
  • Apply occupational therapy interventions to a case study to promote occupational performance.
Author Bio(s)

 

Elizabeth Dwyer DeIuliis, OTD, OTR/L, is the assistant department chair, director of clinical and community education, and academic fieldwork coordinator at Duquesne University’s Department of Occupational Therapy in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She has more than 12 years of clinical experience and maintains an occupational therapy practitioner role at Centers for Rehab Services at UPMC Shadyside Hospital. Her clinical experience is primarily in acute care, hospital-based rehabilitation, and during her occupational therapy doctorate program from Chatham University, she created an evidence-based occupational therapy program for individuals who had breast cancer-related surgery. Dr. DeIuliis has presented at national and regional conferences and co-authored an American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) fact sheet and a clinically based article for OT Practice on occupational therapy and breast cancer. She is an active member of AOTA and the Pennsylvania Occupational Therapy Association (POTA) and is a subject matter expert for the National Board of Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT).
 
Shannon Hellested, MOT, OTR/L, CLT, is a home health occupational therapist. She became a certified lymphedema therapist in 2008 through Klose Training and Consulting. Her clinical experience is primarily in outpatient lymphedema, wound care, and home health. She has been a consultant for the makers of a sequential pneumatic lymphedema compression pump, and she has served as a consultant research therapist for the University of Pittsburgh’s Department of Occupational Therapy.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Robin Newman, OTD, OTR/L, CLT, CDRS, is a clinical assistant professor of occupational therapy at Boston University in the College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College. She has specialty certification in lymphedema therapy and driver rehabilitation. She has extensive experience working with cancer survivors and adults living with neurological disorders. Her research focuses on cancer survivorship, with an emphasis on the late effects of cancer treatments and their impact on occupational performance.

Wound Healing Fundamentals for the Occupational Therapist

Price: $49.95 
Item # I6376  

Release Date: January 3, 2017

Expiration Date: January 3, 2020

This course reviews the anatomy of the skin, the physiology of wound healing for acute and chronic wounds, skin changes across the life span, and the implications of such changes for wound healing among older adults. The course also covers the phases and cellular processes of healing and addresses the forces – both intrinsic and extrinsic – that may limit wound healing. Armed with this knowledge, the clinician can better determine whether a wound is progressing properly and when to intervene with the appropriate cost-effective treatments. This course describes several chronic wound types and acute burn injuries, wound assessment, and fundamental management strategies based on wound characteristics.  This intermediate-level course is designed for both the occupational therapist who is new to wound care and the practicing occupational therapist who would like a review of the fundamentals. This course provides the learner with a basic and foundational knowledge of wound healing and practical applications to guide clinical practice. The learner wishing to treat clients with wounds should further his or she training with more advanced courses on clinical topics. 

 

 

AOTA Content Focus -  Domain of OT: Client Factors; Occupational Therapy Process: Evaluation & Intervention

0.5 AOTA CEUs are awarded for successful completion of this course.

 

 

Disclosures

 

  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
  • Holly Korzendorfer has disclosed that she serves as vice president of clinical business development at DermaRite Industries, a company that manufactures skin care products and distributes wound and nutrition products. Western Schools ensures that this content is free from bias and commercial influence.

 

Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Explain the role of the occupational therapist in wound healing.
  • Describe the anatomy, physiology, structure, and functions of the skin.
  • Describe the physiology of wound healing, including the phases of wound healing and types of wound closure.
  • Identify key components of wound assessment.
  • Select appropriate basic management strategies for chronic wounds based on wound characteristics.
  • Describe the etiology and basic treatment of several common types of wounds.
Author Bio(s)

 

Jennifer Quisberg, MPT, CWS, is a physical therapist and certified wound specialist at Park Nicollet Methodist Hospital in St. Louis Park, Minnesota. She earned her Bachelor of Science degree in 1997 from the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse and her master’s degree in physical therapy in 2000 from the College of St. Catherine (now St. Catherine University). She has practiced wound care for more than 15 years and has been a certified wound specialist for 11 years. She served as an adjunct faculty member from 2011 to 2012 at St. Catherine University. Since 2010, Ms. Quisberg has been an integrated clinical education instructor for St. Catherine University physical therapy students, introducing them to wound care in the clinical setting. In 2009, she coauthored the article “Adjuvant Use of Acoustic Pressure Wound Therapy for Treatment of Chronic Wounds: A Retrospective Analysis,” which was published in the Journal of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing. She was a clinical liaison in 2007 and 2008 for Celleration, Inc., a wound care company located in Eden Prairie, Minnesota, and has served on its clinical advisory board. In 2013, 2014, and 2015, Ms. Quisberg participated in medical mission trips to Haiti, where she taught wound care to the staff at Hôpital Albert Schweitzer. She is a member of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), belongs to the Electrophysiology and Wound Care Section, and has served on an APTA task force to more fully understand and better utilize tests for functional limitation reporting for Medicare. In 2014, Ms. Quisberg received the APTA Wound Management Special Interest Group’s Wound Care Therapist Scholarship to the Symposium on the Advancement of Wound Care.
 
Shirley A. Blanchard, PhD, ABDA, OTR/L, FAOTA, FHDR, received her Bachelor of Science in occupational therapy from the Medical College of Virginia at Virginia Commonwealth University in 1975, her master’s degree in physical education in 1983 from the University of Nebraska Omaha, and her PhD in educational psychology (health and human performance) in 2002 from the University of Nebraska Lincoln. Dr. Blanchard served as Regional Manager of Occupational Therapy for a rehabilitation company focused on service delivery to skilled and intermediate facilities. Dr. Blanchard worked collaboratively with nursing staff to develop seating and positioning interventions aimed at reducing the risk of pressure ulcers. As instructor of record for physical rehabilitation at Creighton University in Omaha, she was invited to coauthor a book chapter with Dr. Barbara Braden, RN (author of the Braden Scale) on risk assessment and pressure sore prevention. The chapter offers strategies for pressure sore prevention in bed and when using wheelchairs and cushions. She is a Fellow of the American Occupational Therapy Association and a Fellow of Health Disparities Research, University of Alabama at Birmingham.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Holly Korzendorfer, PT, PhD, CWS, FACCWS, received her master’s degree in physical therapy from Chapman University in 1995 and her PhD in physical therapy from Nova Southeastern University in 2006. Dr. Korzendorfer is an adjunct assistant professor in the doctor of physical therapy program at Dominican College and is vice president of clinical business development at DermaRite Industries, a company focused on skin and wound care, including nutritional supplements. Dr. Korzendorfer has been a certified wound specialist since 1998 and has diverse managerial and research experience as a physical therapist working in varied care settings across the United States. Dr. Korzendorfer serves as a member of the Academy of Clinical Electrophysiology and Wound Management (ACEWM; a specialty section of the American Physical Therapy Association) Task Force on Physical Therapists in Wound Management Billing and Coding; Ostomy Wound Management (OWM) Editorial Board; American Board of Wound Management (ABWM) Exam Committee; Association for the Advancement of Wound Care (AAWC) Research Committee; and Wound Healing Society (WHS) Education Committee. Dr. Korzendorfer serves on the faculty for PRESENT Wounds, Ostomy and Continence (WOC) and is a fellow of the American College of Clinical Wound Specialists. She has published several peer-reviewed articles and presents locally and nationally on wound management topics.

Susan P. Denham, EdD, OTR/L, CHT, is assistant professor of occupational therapy at the College of Health Sciences, Alabama State University. She received her doctorate in educational leadership, policy, and law from Alabama State University, her master of science in business and resource management from Troy University, and her Bachelor of Science in occupational therapy from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. She has more than 27 years of experience as an occupational therapist, practicing in areas of physical dysfunction, orthopedics, industrial rehabilitation, hand therapy, and pediatrics.

An Introduction to Low Vision Rehabilitation for Occupational Therapists

Price: $29.95 
Item # I6393  

Release Date: August 8, 2017

Expiration Date: August 8, 2020

Blindness is considered to be one of the ten leading causes of disability in the U.S. (Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, 2015).  Legal blindness describes central vision of 20/200 or less in the better eye with best correction or visual field of less than 20 degrees in the better eye (American Foundation for the Blind, 2008).  Low vision is a term used to describe vision loss not corrected by glasses, medicine or surgery. More than 20% of the total U.S. population will be over the age of 65 by the year 2029 (U.S. Census Bureau, 2012). The baby boomer population is projected to be larger than the population of those under the age of 18 by the year 2056 (U.S. Census Bureau, 2012). As the baby boomer population increases, many will be affected by eye diseases (Prevent Blindness America, 2008). This change in population serves as one factor warranting an increase in occupational therapy (OT) services for those individuals experiencing deficits in occupational performance due to age-related visual loss. The importance of occupational therapy’s role in low vision rehabilitation is paramount as the profession progresses as a leading skilled allied health care service for older adults.This basic, introductory course is intended to introduce the occupational therapy practitioner, who may not have received low vision education or is not comfortable intervening with this population, with current evidence-based information related to the management of clients with low vision. The course content is designed to increase the reader’s understanding of and ability to generalize concepts into daily assessment and intervention for clients experiencing occupational performance deficit due to low vision. Occupational Therapy practitioners will need to pursue further education if they wish to specialize in low vision. 

 

 

AOTA Content Focus - Domain of OT: performance skills; OT Process: evaluation & intervention

0.3 AOTA CEUs are awarded upon successful completion of this course.

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe ocular pathology and eye diseases affecting occupational performance and quality of life in clients with vision loss.
  • Differentiate between the interprofessional members of the low vision rehabilitation team.
  • Identify evidence-based assessment tools to evaluate clients with vision loss.
  • Define and recognize the generalist and specialist occupational therapist’s role in low vision rehabilitation.
  • Describe and identify methods whereby an occupational therapy practitioner can integrate adaptations to enhance the safety and independence of clients living with low vision.
Author Bio(s)

 

Amy Rebovich, OTD, OTR/L, SCLV, CLVT, is an occupational therapist who specializes in low vision and is a certified low vision therapist currently working in the VA Pittsburgh Intermediate low vision clinic. Dr. Rebovich earned her post-professional doctor­ate in Occupational Therapy (OTD) degree from Chatham University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 2013 and undergraduate degree at Gannon University, Erie, Pennsylvania, in 1999. In 2002, she became a Certified Low Vision Therapist (CLVT) through the Academy for Certification of Vision Rehabilitation & Education Professionals (ACVREP) and in 2011 obtained the recognition of Specialty Certification in Low Vision through the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA). Dr. Rebovich’s clinical experience is 16 years as a low vision occupational therapist and certified low vision therapist. Specifically, 11 to 12 of those years have been directly in low vision rehabilitation. She has worked in a variety of areas of OT and in blind and low vision in an outpatient nonprofit private practice low vision clinic along with the intermediate low vision clinic at the VA Pittsburgh. She also has experience in acute care, skilled nursing facility, and long-term care facilities with a variety of populations. Dr. Rebovich has worked specifically with the geriatric population in low vision rehabilitation with eye diseases as the primary pathology and with younger veterans with traumatic brain injury, photophobia, migraines, and brain injury affecting functional vision. She has had experience collaborating with research projects with local universities/hospitals and has coauthored and lectured over the years to universities, hospitals, and national, state, and local professional organizations in both the private sector and the VA. Currently, Dr. Rebovich is working on research projects within the VA with an interdisciplinary team.

Jodi Schreiber, OTD, OTR/L, C/NDT, is a 2014 graduate of the post-professional doctorate in Occupational Therapy (OTD) program from Thomas Jefferson University. She also studied at the University of Pittsburgh, where she received both a master of science (1998) and a bachelor of science (1991) degree in Occupational Therapy. She is currently an associate professor in the Master of Occupational Therapy Program at Chatham University. Dr. Schreiber currently holds the position of Chair of the Interprofessional Education Task Force at Chatham and serves as Pennsylvania representative to the American Occupational Therapy Association’s Representative Assembly. Throughout her 26 years as an occupational therapist, Dr. Schreiber has provided occupational therapy in a variety of practice settings; this includes hospitals, nursing homes, private homes, rehabilitation centers, and preschools. Her primary interests are in neuroscience, the diseases/syndromes associated with the brain and spinal cord, low vision rehabilitation, and the scholarship of teaching and learning as it pertains to adult student critical thinking. She has presented both locally and nationally on various topics related to low vision, visual-perceptual disorders and intervention, motor learning, OT intervention with the neurologically impaired adult, infusing occupation into routine OT practice, and teaching methods used in adult learning and interprofessional education. Dr. Schreiber has published in several peer-reviewed journals and has coauthored a textbook and several book chapters in texts used in occupational therapy education.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Kim Schoessow, OTD, OTR/L, is an assistant professor of Occupational Therapy at the MGH Institute of Health Professions in Boston. She is also an occupational therapist at the Massachusetts Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired. She previously worked as an occupational therapist at both the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary in Boston and the Frank Stein and Paul S. May Center for Low Vision Rehabilitation in San Francisco. She was also an instructor of ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School. She is a graduate of the occupational therapy doctoral program at Washington University in St. Louis and the Low Vision Rehabilitation certificate program at the University of Alabama, Birmingham.

Want more choices?
Want more choices?