Disciplines: Occupational Therapy
Hours: 13 Contact Hours
Item#: IGQ13
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13-Hour Upper Extremity Bundle


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Item # IGQ13
When available, the Online Course format is included with the hard copy, eBook, or audio book formats!

This product includes the following courses:
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Lateral and Medial Elbow Epicondylosis: Differential Diagnosis and Treatment Guidelines

Price: $29.95 
Item # I6351  

Expiration Date: December 11, 2018

Epicondylosis is a common problem that can affect a broad range of individuals, from industrial workers to athletes. It is an overuse injury of elbow tendons that frequently causes chronic elbow pain that can interfere with work, recreation, and daily activities.  Although many healthcare professionals assume these tendon pathologies are related to an inflammatory condition, the most current research has demonstrated that this tendon pathology is most commonly due to a degenerative process.  As a result, inappropriate therapeutic interventions are being prescribed for patients with epicondylosis, resulting in inconsistent patient responses and high rates of recurrent symptoms. It is important for physical and occupational therapists to be able to recognize and manage epicondylosis as a primarily degenerative condition. By doing so, therapists can more effectively reduce the duration of this condition. 

This intermediate-level course provides a review of relevant elbow anatomy, examines other possible causes of elbow pain, describes treatment techniques commonly used in management of the disorder, and discusses areas where further research is needed.  Various approaches to restoring pain-free elbow function are examined including conservative measures, post-surgical treatment options, and medical interventions. Recommendations are made regarding the most effective treatment interventions to promote successful outcomes based on current evidence.  This course is appropriate for physical therapists and physical therapist assistants, occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants, and rehabilitation professionals who, in the course of their clinical practice, are likely to diagnosis and manage lateral and medial epicondylosis, and attempt to prevent its recurrence.

AOTA Content Focus: Domain of OT (Areas of Occupation); Occupational Therapy Process (Evaluation, Intervention)

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the incidence, prevalence, and impact of epicondylosis. 
  • Identify the anatomical structures typically involved in epicondylosis.
  • List common risk factors and etiologies for epicondylosis.
  • Recognize the components of a comprehensive physical examination for individuals with epicondylosis.
  • Describe the treatment interventions for the nonsurgical management of epicondylosis.
  • Describe the common types of surgical interventions and the postsurgical management of epicondylosis.
  • Describe the prognosis of individuals with epicondylosis.
Author Bio(s)

Ann Lucado, PT, PhD, CHT, is a physical therapist and certified hand therapist who has specialized in upper extremity and orthopedic rehabilitation for the past 22 years. She has conducted numerous instructional seminars specific to upper extremity rehabilitation across the country. She received a bachelor of science degree in psychology from James Madison University, a master of science degree in community health education and physical therapy from Old Dominion University, and a doctor of philosophy degree with an emphasis in research methodology and design in physical therapy from Nova Southeastern University. She is a member of both the American Society of Hand Therapists and American Physical Therapy Association and is active in clinical research. She is the author of several research articles related to elbow tendinopathies and rehabilitation following distal radius fractures. Dr. Lucado is currently an assistant professor in the doctor of physical therapy program at Mercer University in Atlanta, GA. 

Henry Heard, PA-C, MPAS, MA, received a physician’s assistant bachelor’s degree from the Medical College of Georgia in 1976, an associate degree in nursing from Kennesaw College (now Kennesaw State University) in 1982, a master of physician assistant studies from Nebraska University, Omaha, in 1997, and a master of arts with a specialty in air warfare from American Military University in 2004. He is enrolled in Nova Southeastern University’s doctor of health science program. Mr. Heard is currently an associate clinical professor at Mercer University with clinical responsibilities in the emergency department at Emory Johns Creek Hospital, Johns Creek, GA. He is currently serving as Commander of the Kentucky Air National Guard’s 123rd Medical Group, 123rd Airlift Wing. He has been deployed twice to Southwest Asia, the second time as Commander of the 447th EMEDS (Air Force hospital), Baghdad, Iraq. Mr. Heard has practiced medicine as a physician assistant for 37 years in Georgia, with extensive clinical experience in emergency medicine, orthopedic surgery/sports medicine, family practice, and internal medicine. For 15 years, Mr. Heard worked with an upper-extremity subspecialist orthopedic surgeon in a large orthopedic practice in Atlanta, where he treated patients with “tennis elbow” both surgically and conservatively on a regular basis.  

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Cindy Johnson Armstrong, PT, DPT, CHT, received her MPT from the University of Southern California and her tDPT from the University of Colorado, Denver. She is an active member of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) and currently serves as president of the APTA Hand Rehabilitation Section. Dr. Armstrong is on the Hand Therapy Certification Commission (HTCC) Examination Review Committee and is an active member of the American Society of Hand Therapists (ASHT), assisting in the development of the ASHT Code of Ethics. She has served as general coordinator for the Denver Hand Special Interest Group and is an honorary board member of the Rocky Mountain Hand Surgery Society. Dr. Armstrong is a core faculty member and senior instructor at the University of Colorado Physical Therapy Program and continues to see patients in the Anschutz Outpatient Pavilion at University of Colorado Hospital. She has presented both locally and nationally on elbow, wrist, and hand disorders. 

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Improving Intervention Effectiveness

Price: $29.95 
Item # I6357  

Expiration Date: March 20, 2019

Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common compression neuropathy of the upper extremity; impacting up to 10 million people a year. The sources of CTS are varied and can be precipitated by many different aspects of daily life; however, CTS primarily results from repeated or prolonged compression of the median nerve as it passes through the carpal tunnel along with nine flexor tendons. Median nerve compression can result from repetitive hand and wrist activities, a specific traumatic injury, a systemic condition such as diabetes or pregnancy, or the thickening of the protective sheaths that surround the flexor tendons that extend through the carpal tunnel. Exposure to these varied sources of compression can place an individual on the path to developing CTS without being aware of the progression of the condition until symptoms appear. 

This course enables practitioners to develop an evidence-based practice approach to the assessment, prevention, and treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome. Although designed for intermediate-level clinicians, the course begins with a brief overview of the anatomical and physiological features of CTS, including a summary of symptoms and functional impairments. A discussion of potential causes and risk factors is presented, followed by a critical analysis of various assessment tools and tests used to evaluate an individual for CTS. Finally, the evidence for various preventive and rehabilitative interventions is reviewed with a focus on rehabilitative interventions. By gaining a better understanding of the complexities of CTS, practitioners will be able to formulate more effective and efficient evidence-based interventions for clients with CTS.

AOTA Content Focus - Occupational Therapy Process: Evaluation, Intervention 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the prevalence, incidence, and impact of carpal tunnel syndrome on clients’ activities of daily living.
  • Recognize the normal anatomical structure of the carpal tunnel, as well as naturally occurring variants.
  • Describe the etiology and clinical presentation of carpal tunnel syndrome.
  • Identify the accuracy and utility of assessment tools and tests used to evaluate clients with potential carpal tunnel syndrome.
  • Differentiate the efficacy of various interventions for preventing or remediating symptoms and functional deficits resulting from carpal tunnel syndrome.
Author Bio(s)

Shawn C. Roll, PhD, OTR/L, CWCE, RMSK, FAOTA, is an occupational therapist with 12 years of clinical and research experience in the assessment, prevention, and rehabilitation of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. From The Ohio State University, Dr. Roll received a bachelor of science degree in occupational therapy, a master of science degree in allied health, and a doctor of philosophy degree in health and rehabilitation sciences. In addition to being a licensed occupational therapist, he is a certified work capacity evaluator and is a registered musculoskeletal sonographer. Dr. Roll is currently an assistant professor in the Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy at the University of Southern California. His research investigates the etiology and prevention of carpal tunnel syndrome and evaluates the process and clinical benefits of integrating musculoskeletal sonography into clinical rehabilitation. In addition to other scholarly work, Dr. Roll has authored more than 10 publications related to the diagnosis and treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome, and he has presented his work both nationally and internationally.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Victoria Priganc, PhD, OTR, CHT, CLT, is an adjunct faculty member at the University of New England and is an associate editor for the Journal of Hand Therapy. She received her PhD in occupational therapy from Nova Southeastern University and her master’s degree in movement science and rehabilitation from the University of Vermont. She has been an occupational therapist for 20 years and a certified hand therapist for more than 15 years. She has authored numerous publications and book chapters, and was an invited guest editor for the Journal of Hand Therapy Basic Science issue. Victoria has been an Active Member in the American Society of Hand Therapists.

Conservative and Surgical Management of the Osteoarthritic Hand and Wrist: An Occupational Therapy Perspective

Price: $39.95 
Item # I6314  

Expiration Date: September 2, 2019

This intermediate-level course provides a detailed overview of the pathophysiology and mechanics of the joints of the hand of those diagnosed with OA. In-depth information is presented on the medical diagnosis of OA, including the criteria established by the American College of Rheumatology, the distinction between primary and secondary OA, the taking of a client history, and the physical examination. The management goals and treatment options in managing OA are discussed, including conservative medical management, pharmacology, physical and occupational therapy interventions, and surgical options.

AOTA Content Focus: Occupational Therapy Process: Evaluation, Intervention, Outcomes

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the etiology and pathophysiology of osteoarthritis (OA) of the hand and wrist.
  • Describe the process and criteria for reaching a medical diagnosis of OA.
  • Identify the goals and treatment options for managing OA.
  • Describe the management and treatment of osteoarthritis of the proximal and distal finger joints, including occupational therapy interventions.
  • Describe the management and treatment of osteoarthritis of the carpometacarpal thumb joint, including occupational therapy interventions.
  • Describe the management and treatment of osteoarthritis of the wrist, including occupational therapy interventions.
Author Bio(s)

Debbie Amini, EdD, OTR/L, CHT, FAOTA, is the director of professional development for the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA). She received her bachelor of science degree in occupational therapy from Quinnipiac University, her master’s degree in education from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, and her doctorate in education from North Carolina State University. A certified hand therapist since 1991, Dr. Amini worked as the director of an occupational therapy assistant program for 14 years before becoming an assistant professor of occupational therapy at East Carolina University in Greenville, NC. She served a three-year term as chair of AOTA’s Commission on Practice and is the author of several AOTA official documents. Since 1999, Dr. Amini has written bimonthly print columns in Advance for Occupational Therapy Practitioners, including “Hands On” and “Inside Occupation.” Her articles have appeared in Advance for Directors in Rehabilitation, the PD-SIS quarterly newsletter, OT Practice magazine, and AJOT. In addition to authoring online courses and textbook chapters, she has contributed the hand, wrist, and forearm component of the Occupational Therapy Practice Guidelines for Individuals with Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses published by AOTA. Dr. Amini has presented at the AOTA, NCOTA, and ASHT annual conferences and has conducted regional 2-day workshops on the topics of hand therapy and authentic OT practice.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Teri Bielefeld, PT, CHT, is a graduate of the program in physical therapy at Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She has worked at the Zablocki VA Medical Center in Milwaukee for the past 34 years and holds the position of PT clinical specialist in the outpatient physical therapy clinic. Ms. Bielefeld is a clinical instructor in the physical therapy programs at Marquette University, Carroll University, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She has been a certified hand therapist since 1991 and has lectured nationally and internationally on numerous hand rehabilitation topics. She has authored articles, a monologue, and a chapter titled “Therapist’s Management of the Thumb Carpometacarpal Joint with Osteoarthritis” in Rehabilitation of the Hand and Upper Extremity (6th edition). She twice served as president of the Hand Rehabilitation Section of the American Physical Therapy Association, and serves as its Treasurer. Ms. Bielefeld received the Marquette University 2000 Merit Award for distinguished professional achievement and the 1998 American Physical Therapy Association Henry O. and Florence P. Kendall Award for Clinical Excellence.

Adhesive Capsulitis: Occupational Therapy Examination, Treatment Diagnosis, and Intervention, 2nd Ed

Price: $29.95 
Item # I6435  

Release Date: February 7, 2018

Expiration Date: February, 7 2021

This intermediate level course developed for occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants, reviews the functional anatomy of the shoulder, provides an overview of adhesive capsulitis, including its etiology and epidemiology, and offers an up-to-date, evidence-based foundation for the diagnosis and intervention of adhesive capsulitis.

 

AOTA Content Focus: OT Process: Evaluation & Intervention

0.3 AOTA CEUs are awarded upon successful completion of this course.

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the normal functional anatomy of the shoulder girdle and deficits commonly associated with adhesive capsulitis.
  • Describe the epidemiology, etiology, and pathogenesis of adhesive capsulitis.
  • Differentiate adhesive capsulitis from other painful shoulder conditions using symptom presentation, classification of the disorder, and functional outcome tools in the diagnostic process.
  • Describe evidence-based occupational therapy examination and diagnosis for adhesive capsulitis.
  • Identify occupational therapy interventions supported by current best evidence to ensure optimal patient outcomes at various stages of the disorder.
  • Summarize current evidence-based medical management adjuncts or alternatives to occupational therapy in the presence of adhesive capsulitis.
Author Bio(s)

Lee Marinko, PT, ScD, OCS, FAAOMPT, is a clinical assistant professor at Boston University. She completed her ScD at Boston University’s Movement and Rehabilitation Science program. She is a board certified specialist in orthopaedic physical therapy and a fellow of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapy. Dr. Marinko’s primary teaching responsibilities are in muscu­loskeletal systems; she teaches a lab course covering examination and treatment of the upper extremity, process of examination, and clinical medicine. Dr. Marinko has co-authored two articles, published in Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery and The Journal of Manual & Manipulative Therapy, on the topics of exercise and manual therapy for painful shoulder conditions. Dr. Marinko has 27 years of clini­cal experience, mostly in orthopaedic manual therapy, and she currently treats patients part time at Bos­ton University’s Physical Therapy Center at the Ryan Center for Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Brian J. Eckenrode, PT, DPT, OCS, received his master of science degree in physical therapy from Arcadia University and his DPT from Temple University. He is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Physical Therapy at Arcadia University, where he teaches courses on orthopaedic examination and intervention. Previously he worked at Penn Sports Medicine Center, Good Shepherd Penn Partners, where he advanced from Senior Level, I & II Advanced Clinician, to Sports Team Leader. He is a board certified orthopaedic clinical specialist. He has published several journal articles and book chapters on shoulder biomechanics and injuries, and has lectured on orthopaedic and sports injuries at the local and national level.

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