Disciplines: Dentists
Hours: 40 Contact Hours
Item#: LDUTN

 

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Item # LDUTN
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The Impact of Vascular and Cardiovascular Diseases on Oral Health, 2nd Edition

Price: $39.95 
Item # L0755  

Release Date: July 27, 2010

Review Date: July 8, 2016

Expiration Date: July 7, 2019

 

The oral presentation of microvascular diseases such as diabetes is well documented, but many common cardiovascular conditions, including ischemic heart disease, also present with oral manifestations. In addition, patients with specific vascular diseases, such as granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly called Wegener’s granulomatosis), may present with pathognomonic oral lesions. In some instances, oral involvement precedes the appearance of other symptoms or lesions at other locations. To aid in diagnosis and guide the approach to dental treatment, dental healthcare professionals should recognize oral manifestations of cardiovascular diseases and other systemic or multiorgan diseases with a vascular component. A thorough understanding of the potential oral side effects of therapeutic agents commonly used to treat cardiovascular diseases is very helpful in overall patient management.

This intermediate-level course addresses current concepts regarding the relationship between oral health and vascular and cardiovascular diseases, including the impact on oral health of common cardiovascular pharmacotherapies. This course is intended for dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants, as well as other healthcare professionals involved in the management of patients with selected vascular and cardiovascular diseases.

 

AGD Subject Code: 730
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 4 continuing education credits.

 

 

Disclosures

 

  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.

 

Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Discuss the prevalence and history of cardiovascular disease and its relationship with periodontal disease.
  • Describe the signs, symptoms, and oral manifestations of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes.
  • List oral presentations of cardiac agents used in treating cardiovascular disease.
  • Identify oral manifestations of congenital cardiovascular diseases and diseases with a vascular component.
  • Explain oral healthcare recommendations for patients with selected cardiovascular conditions.
Author Bio(s)

 

John F. Kross, DMD, MSc, received his doctorate in dental medicine from Temple University School of Dentistry in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He completed a fellowship at Temple University Hospital in oral oncology and received a hospital appointment to the Department of Dentistry at the Medical Centers of Delaware (now the Christiana Health Care System). His professional training and experience include practicing general dentistry in Wilmington, Delaware, and in New London, Pennsylvania, as well as instructing students at Delaware Technical Community College in oral pathology. Dr. Kross has received numerous academic awards for his work in oral surgery, fixed partial prosthodontics, periodontics, and endodontics. He has been composing monographs, manuscripts, and continuing medical education courses since 1991.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Paul Subar, DDS, EdD, FACD, is an assistant professor of dental practice and director of the Special Care Clinic and Hospital Dentistry at the University of the Pacific, Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry in San Francisco, California. Dr. Subar earned his bachelor’s degree in biochemistry and molecular biology at the University of California, Santa Cruz; his DDS at the University of California, Los Angeles; his advanced training in hospital dentistry at the University of California Los Angeles Medical Center; and his doctorate of education at the Benerd School of Education, University of the Pacific.

Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

HPV and Oral Cancer: Exploring the Link

Price: $49.95 
Item # L0731  

Release Date: May 16, 2016

Expiration Date: May 15, 2019

 

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States; an estimated 79 million Americans are currently infected with HPV and each year approximately 14 million people are newly infected. There is a growing body of research demonstrating the increasing incidence of HPV-related cancer in the oropharynx, which includes the tonsillar area and base of the tongue. As is the case with other cancers, early detection and timely treatment of HPV-related oral cancers can reduce the number of deaths from this disease.

Dental professionals are well positioned to play a role in the education, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of HPV-related oral cancer. Regular dental checkups that include a comprehensive head and neck examination can be beneficial in the early identification of precancerous and cancerous lesions. Dental patients may have questions about their risk of infection, their risk of developing cancer, and the protective value of available HPV vaccines. The established relationship between HPV and oral cancer will require dental providers to expand traditional patient education topics (i.e., tobacco and alcohol) to include information on HPV and develop communication skills appropriate for responding to patient inquiries and concerns as part of a comprehensive approach to preventive oral health care.

This intermediate-level course provides dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants with general information about HPV, evidence of the association between oral HPV and oral cancer, and effective ways to further communicate this information to patients. This course provides dental professionals with information that will enable them to effectively meet the challenges they face as the link between HPV and oral health continues to emerge.

 

AGD Subject Code: 750
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 5 continuing education credits.

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the human papillomavirus (HPV), including its prevalence, risk factors, symptoms, and links to cancer.
  • Describe oral HPV, including its prevalence, risk factors, symptoms, modes of transmission, and detection.
  • Discuss the prevalence, manifestations, and diagnosis of HPV-related oral cancer.
  • Explain the economic impact of HPV.
  • Identify the key tools for preventing the transmission of HPV.
  • Describe the dentist’s role in discussing HPV with patients.
Author Bio(s)

 

Virginia J. Dodd, PhD, MPH, RDH, received an associate of science degree in dental hygiene from St. Petersburg College in 1990 and an MPH in 1994 and PhD in 2000 in public health from the University of South Florida (USF). In 2001, Dr. Dodd became acting program director for the Florida Prevention Research
Center at USF and research assistant professor in the Department of Community and Family Health within the College of Public Health at USF. She subsequently joined the faculty at the University of Florida (UF) in Gainesville, initially as assistant professor and subsequently as associate professor in the Department of Health Education and Behavior, before becoming an associate professor in the Department of Community Dentistry and Behavioral Science of the College of Dentistry at UF in 2011. Dr. Dodd has taught in the areas of human sexuality, health education theory, social marketing, and psychosocial issues across the lifespan. She has written and lectured extensively on HPV prevalence among female university students, oral cancer prevention knowledge and behaviors in community samples of adults, and oral cancer screening and patient education practices among dentists and dental hygienists, including their readiness to provide HPV information to patients.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

John Basile, DDS, DMSc, received his DDS degree from the State University of New York at Stony Brook and completed a one-year dental residency at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Washington, DC. After practicing dentistry for three years, he began his oral pathology training at Harvard University Dental School and research training in a papillomavirus laboratory at Harvard Medical School, becoming a Fellow of the American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology and graduating with a degree in oral biology in 2002. Dr. Basile was a post-doctoral Research Fellow at the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, in Bethesda, Maryland, before taking his current position as an assistant professor at the University of Maryland Dental School in the Department of Oncology and Diagnostic Sciences. He is also a member of the Molecular and Structural Biology branch of the Marlene and Stuart Greenebaum Cancer Center at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Dr. Basile has been a board-certified oral and maxillofacial pathologist since 2008.

Improving Oral Health Care for Patients With Special Needs, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0734  

Release Date: July 27, 2010

Review Date: June 2, 2016

Expiration Date: June 1, 2019

 

Recent years have seen a dramatic increase in the number of people with special healthcare needs, and the trend is expected to continue. Population shifts as a result of immigration and other socio-economic factors will persist in straining the current delivery system. The special needs population already faces barriers in obtaining oral health services, and this situation will continue to deteriorate under the present system of care.

As policy makers wrestle with major health disparities experienced by people with special health-care needs, dental professionals must be at the forefront of ensuring adequate delivery of oral healthcare services to this population.

This basic-level course addresses current thinking about the challenges dental professionals face with providing oral healthcare services for people with special needs. It identifies the factors that hinder access to dental care and presents strategies to improve the provision of care for the special needs population. The course includes recommendations for the management and treatment of special needs patients.

 

AGD Subject Code: 753
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Define patient with special needs.
  • Describe the oral health challenges of patients with special needs.
  • Identify the factors that hinder access to dental care for patients with special needs.
  • Discuss recommendations for the management and treatment of patients with special needs.
  • Identify strategies for improving oral health and access to care for patients with special needs.
Author Bio(s)

 

John F. Kross, MSc, DMD, received his doctorate in dental medicine from Temple University School of Dentistry in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He completed a fellowship at Temple University Hospital in oral oncology and received a hospital appointment to the Department of Dentistry at the Medical Centers of Delaware (now the Christiana Health Care System). His professional training and experience include practicing general dentistry in Wilmington, Delaware, and in New London, Pennsylvania, as well as instructing students at Delaware Technical Community College in oral pathology. Dr. Kross has received numerous academic awards for his work in oral surgery, fixed partial prosthodontics, periodontics, and endodontics. He has been composing monographs, manuscripts, and continuing medical education courses since 1991.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Toni M. Roucka, RN, DDS, MA, is an associate professor of restorative dentistry and associate dean for academic affairs at Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine in Alton, Illinois. She maintains an active nursing license and is a Fellow of the American College of Dentists and immediate president of the American Society for Dental Ethics. Dr. Roucka obtained her DDS degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry and master’s degree in population health – bioethics from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Roucka is a nationally recognized speaker on the subject of ethics in dentistry and has taught restorative dentistry at both Marquette University and Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine.

Nutrition for the Dental Patient, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0752  

Release Date: July 30, 2013

Review Date: July 5, 2016

Expiration Date: July 4, 2019

 

Poor nutrition can lead to caries, periodontal problems, and loss of teeth and bone. In addition, nutritional problems can put our patients at risk for certain systemic diseases and conditions such as heart problems, cancer, stroke and diabetes. This basic-level course reviews several important areas concerning proper nutrition for the dental patient including antioxidants, sugars, fats, the special nutritional needs of pregnant patients, and the intake of mercury, calcium and Vitamin D.

 

 

AGD Subject Code: 150

Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Identify different antioxidants and their dietary sources.
  • List several sugar substitutes.
  • Describe different types of fats.
  • Describe the role of dietary mercury.
  • Explain the importance of calcium and vitamin D.
  • Describe the special dietary needs and concerns of pregnant dental patients.
Author Bio(s)

 

Ronald M. Mancini, DDS, maintains a private dental practice in Bethesda, Maryland. He is a member of the American Dental Association (ADA), the Maryland State Dental Association (MSDA), and the Southern Maryland Dental Society (SMDS). Dr. Mancini has held several positions with the SMDS, including those of trustee, president, vice president, treasurer, and editor, as well as serving as a delegate and head of the delegation to the MSDA House of Delegates.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

Recurrent Aphthous Ulceration: Epidemiology, Differential Diagnosis, and Therapy

Price: $19.95 
Item # L0740  

Release Date: July 18, 2016

Expiration Date: July 17, 2019

 

Recurrent aphthous ulceration (RAU), also known as recurrent aphthous stomatitis and canker sores, is a common oral ulceration condition. RAU is widely considered to be a chronic inflammatory condition that affects approximately 20% of the population. These lesions tend to be episodic and may repeatedly arise over time in otherwise healthy individuals. RAU is a common lesion that presents to all clinical dentists. It is important for dentists to be knowledgeable concerning this pathologic condition in order to alleviate patients’ concerns and pain.

This basic-level course is intended to educate dentists and dental hygienists regarding RAU so that they are better equipped to effectively diagnose and treat their patients with this condition. It is important to provide clinicians with necessary information regarding diagnosis (including differential diagnosis) and treatment. The section on etiopathology discusses the immune-relate etiology of RAU as well as the gaps in our understanding of what causes RAU. The course addresses the epidemiology and general characteristics of RAU and differentiates the forms of the condition. Research on the link between celiac disease and RAU is presented and discussed. Finally, the course presents information on the varied treatment modalities for RAU.

 

 

AGD Subject Code: 734

 
Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Outline the epidemiology of oral recurrent aphthous ulceration (RAU).
  • Differentiate the three forms of RAU.
  • Describe the immune-related etiology for RAU.
  • Discuss differential diagnoses involving RAU.
  • Identify the treatments available for RAU.
Author Bio(s)

 

Ronald S. Brown, DDS, MS, Dipl ABOM, FAOM (HON), FACD, FICD, is a professor in the Department of Comprehensive Dentistry, Division of Oral Diagnosis, at Howard University College of Dentistry. Dr. Brown attended the University of Maryland and graduated from Georgetown University School of Dentistry in 1971. After serving in the United States Army Dental Corps, Dr. Brown began in private dental practice in Northern Virginia and the District of Columbia. In 1988, he completed postdoctoral education at Georgetown University with an MS in pharmacology and oral medicine. Dr. Brown has held faculty positions at Georgetown University School of Dentistry and the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. Currently, he is a professor of oral diagnosis at Howard University College of Dentistry (HUCD), a clinical associate professor of otolaryngology at Georgetown University Medical Center, and a volunteer clinical research associate at the Hematology Branch of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health. He is also the director of continuing dental education at HUCD. Dr. Brown’s areas of research include oral medicine, drug-induced gingival overgrowth, clinical trials, and oral inflammatory diseases (chronic oral graft-versus-host disease). He is a reviewer for JADA; General Dentistry; Oral Diseases; Journal of Dental Education; Postgraduate Medicine; and Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontics. He is on the editorial board of Dentistry Today and Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dentistry. He has more than 100 published peer-reviewed journal articles and more than a dozen combined published books and book chapters and has lectured and presented widely, both nationally and internationally. His mentors include Dr. William K. Bottomley, Dr. William T. Beaver, Dr. Sol Silverman, Jr., and Dr. Samuel Dreizen. For the past several years, Dr. Brown has been continuously listed as one of the top 100 CDE providers by Dentistry Today. He is a Diplomate of the American Board of Oral Medicine (ABOM), past-president of the ABOM, and a past-president of the American Academy of Oral Medicine. 

LaToya Barham, DDS, is an assistant professor and predoctoral program clinical coordinator in the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at Howard University College of Dentistry (HUCD). Dr. Barham earned a bachelor of science degree in biology from Clark Atlanta University in 2000 and a DDS from HUCD in 2004. She went on to earn a certificate in pediatric dentistry from HUCD in 2006. Dr. Barham is the creator and director of H.O.P.E. Yes!, a 3-week summer enrichment program that exposes underrepresented minority elementary, middle, and high school students to careers in dentistry and allied health sciences. In addition to her academic appointment, Dr. Barham maintains private practices in Northern Virginia and the District of Columbia.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Raymond K. Martin, DDS, MAGD, graduated in 1979 from Texas Tech University with a bachelor’s degree in microbiology and earned his DDS in 1983 from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. He then went on to study at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine in the General Practice Residency Program. Dr. Martin began his work in dental risk management after being awarded a Mastership in the Academy of General Dentistry. He consults with 20 legal firms as an expert witness and lectures extensively on dental risk management and ethics in dentistry. In addition, Dr. Martin teaches CAD/CAM dentistry as a CEREC mentor and has served as a Key Opinion Leader for an international dental implant manufacturer. Dr. Martin has maintained a private practice for more than three decades and is currently president of the Massachusetts Dental Society. He has served the American Dental Association on the Future of Dentistry work group and is currently a member of the Council on Government Affairs.

Ethical Decision Making in Dental Practice, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0770  

Release Date: July 30, 2013

Review Date: August 1, 2016

Expiration Date: July 31, 2019

Ethical questions cannot be answered by “dental science”; rather, it is often necessary to delve into broader, more basic questions that do not have clear-cut answers and require thoughtful reflection by professionals. What does it mean, for example, to be a professional? What are my obligations to this given patient, my colleagues, my community, and to myself? Ethical decision making is also required in relatively narrow questions: What would be in this patient’s best interests? Should I advertise my services in this manner, or even at all?

This basic-level course introduces the concept of ethical decision making and provides three ethical decision-making models to help dental healthcare providers navigate complex dilemmas. Case studies are used to help reinforce important ideas and provide a practical application of the concepts. The ability to systematically analyze and solve any ethical dilemma is arguably as important as the technical skills required to perform clinical dentistry.

 

AGD Subject Code: 555
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives
Course Objectives
  • Differentiate between legal and ethical concerns.
  • Describe historical contributions of ethical theories.
  • Explain the relationship between dentistry and professionalism.
  • Describe the principles outlined in the American Dental Association (ADA) Principles of Ethics, Code of Professional Conduct, and Advisory Opinions.
  • Explain the elements and principles of ethical decision making based on case scenarios.
Author Bio(s)

Steven E. Davis, MS, LMLP, LCP, has more than 23 years of experience as a psychologist and psychotherapist in behavioral and mental healthcare settings. A licensed psychologist in the state of Kansas, Davis earned his master’s degree in applied/clinical psychology from Fort Hays State University. He has been a psychologist and clinician for emergency intervention and screening at Prairie View, a regional behavioral healthcare center, and an adjunct instructor at Newman University, in Wichita. His articles and research have appeared in the Journal of Clinical Psychology, Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy, and Psychology in the Schools, among others.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Toni M. Roucka, RN, DDS, MA, is an associate professor of restorative dentistry at Southern Illinois University, School of Dental Medicine, Edwardsville. She maintains an active nursing license and is a Fellow of the American College of Dentists and immediate past president of the American Society for Dental Ethics. Dr. Roucka obtained her DDS degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry and a master’s degree in population health – bioethics from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Roucka is a nationally recognized speaker on the subject of ethics in dentistry and has taught restorative dentistry at both Marquette Univdersity and the Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine. As a volunteer, she has provided dental care to underserved populations in Guatemala, Venezuela, the Dominican Republic, and Tanzania.

Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Comprehensive Review for Dental Professionals

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0776  

Release Date: August 26, 2016

Expiration Date: August 25, 2019

 

Sleep-disordered breathing is a common disorder, causing a range of harmful clinical, social, and economic sequelae. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common sleep-related breathing disorder. The prevalence of OSA is increasing rapidly. Dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants are well positioned to recognize this disorder, refer patients for appropriate testing, and successfully treat patients with oral appliances. Dental professionals trained in treating sleep-disordered breathing are a vital part of a multidisciplinary team on the forefront of dealing with this serious public health issue.

This course reviews OSA from a dental perspective. It addresses current findings on the links between overall health and OSA and cites common presenting symptoms likely to be encountered in the dental practice. This intermediate-level course discusses the latest evidence-based diagnostic approaches for OSA and outlines recommended treatment strategies, including oral appliances and surgical intervention, to mitigate the health impact of this common condition. 

 

 

AGD Subject Code: 160
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Discuss the importance of sufficient sleep.
  • Describe the prevalence, etiology, and risk factors associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).
  • Explain the clinical consequences of untreated OSA.
  • Describe the screening and diagnosis of OSA.
  • Identify the treatment options for OSA.
Author Bio(s)

 

Jeffrey L. Tarlow, DDS, earned his DDS from Case Western Reserve University School of Dentistry, Cleveland, Ohio, before pursuing a Clinical Fellowship in Prosthetic Dentistry at Harvard University School of Dental Medicine and a residency in fixed and removable prosthodontics at the Veterans Administration Outpatient Clinic in Boston. He served as a dentist for the Department of Veterans Affairs for more than 40 years, serving 31 of those years as a staff prosthodontist. Dr. Tarlow was director of the General Practice Residency Program at the Manhattan campus of the Department of Veterans Affairs’ New York Harbor Healthcare System from 1985 to 2016. Dr. Tarlow was a peer reviewer for The International Journal of Prosthodontics for 5 years and a principal investigator for two major dental implant clinical research studies; he has had 13 articles published in peer-reviewed journals. He has lectured extensively on restorative and implant treatment for the geriatric patient.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Raymond K. Martin, DDS, MAGD, graduated in 1979 from Texas Tech University with a bachelor’s degree in microbiology and earned his DDS in 1983 from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. He then went on to study at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine in the General Practice Residency Program. Dr. Martin began his work in dental risk management after being awarded a Mastership in the Academy of General Dentistry. He consults with 20 legal firms as an expert witness and lectures extensively on dental risk management and ethics in dentistry. In addition, Dr. Martin teaches CAD/CAM dentistry as a CEREC mentor and has served as a Key Opinion Leader for an international dental implant manufacturer. Dr. Martin has maintained a private practice for more than three decades and is currently president of the Massachusetts Dental Society. He has served the American Dental Association on the Future of Dentistry work group and is currently a member of the Council on Government Affairs.

Periodontal Disease: Pathophysiology, Risk Factors, and Systemic Links, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0780  

Release Date: July 31, 2013

Review Date: September 9, 2016

Expiration Date: September 8, 2019

 

Periodontal disease is the primary cause of tooth loss in adults. Nearly half of all adults age 30 and older in the United States suffer from periodontal disease; the incidence of periodontal disease increases as people age, with approximately 70% of adults age 65 and older having the disease. The prevalence of periodontal disease varies among ethnic groups and between genders. Increased incidence of periodontal disease has been linked to poverty, lower levels of education, and smoking.

The symptoms of periodontal disease range from those that are nearly undetectable by the patient to those that are severe and alarming. All too often, periodontitis is a silent destroyer of oral health because pain is absent unless an acute infection occurs.

This basic-level course reviews the risk factors associated with periodontal disease, and discusses the potential links between periodontal disease and systemic conditions, such as diabetes, obesity, coronary heart disease, osteoporosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. The course describes the etiology and pathophysiology of periodontal disease, focusing on microbiology, viral causes, the autoimmune and inflammatory response, resident and infiltrating cells of the periodontium, and matrix metalloproteinases. The course prepares dental professionals to recognize periodontal disease and take steps to prevent this condition and to treat patients who already have or are at risk for developing periodontal disease.

 

 

 

AGD Subject Code: 490

 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the etiology and pathophysiology of periodontal disease.
  • Identify the risk factors for periodontal disease.
  • Describe the potential links between periodontal disease and systemic disease.
Author Bio(s)

 

John F. Kross, DMD, MSc, received his doctorate in dental medicine from Temple University School of Dentistry in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He completed a fellowship at Temple University Hospital in oral oncology and received a hospital appointment to the Department of Dentistry at the Medical Centers of Delaware (now the Christiana Health Care System). His professional training and experience include practicing general dentistry in Wilmington, Delaware, and in New London, Pennsylvania, as well as instructing students at Delaware Technical Community College in oral pathology. Dr. Kross has received numerous academic awards for his work in oral surgery, fixed partial prosthodontics, periodontics, and endodontics. He has been composing monographs, manuscripts, and continuing medical education courses since 1991.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Raymond K. Martin, DDS, MAGD, graduated in 1979 from Texas Tech University with a bachelor’s degree in microbiology and earned his DDS in 1983 from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. He then went on to study at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine in the General Practice Residency Program. Dr. Martin began his work in dental risk management after being awarded a Mastership in the Academy of General Dentistry. He consults with 20 legal firms as an expert witness and lectures extensively on dental risk management and ethics in dentistry. In addition, Dr. Martin teaches CAD/CAM dentistry as a CEREC mentor and has served as a Key Opinion Leader for an international dental implant manufacturer. Dr. Martin has maintained a private practice for more than three decades and is currently president of the Massachusetts Dental Society. He has served the American Dental Association on the Future of Dentistry work group and is currently a member of the Council on Government Affairs.

Dental Erosion: Causes and Preventative Practices, 2nd Edition

Price: $19.95 
Item # L0781  

Release Date: July 30, 2013

Review Date: September 19, 2016

Expiration Date: September 18, 2019

Dental erosion is a progressive loss of dental hard tissue caused by chemical processes without involvement of bacteria. This enamel dissolution is an irreversible process not directly associated with mechanical or traumatic factors, which distinguishes it from other types of wear, such as attrition (loss of tooth structure due to clenching or grinding), abrasion (mechanical loss of tooth structure caused by a foreign element), or abfraction (loss of tooth structure at the gumline due to occlusal forces). The clinical features of dental erosion appear as well-defined, wedge-shaped areas facially and cervically. The occurrence of enamel erosion lesions is associated primarily with intrinsic and extrinsic acids.

The rise in consumption of soft drinks, including sports drinks, has been linked to increases in the rates of dental erosion. The additives to these drinks, not the beverage pH per se, appear to be the causative factors contributing to enamel dissolution. Furthermore, fruit-flavored drinks and unsweetened juices appear to have the same erosive potential as carbonated drinks.

This basic-level course provides dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants with guidelines for recognizing and diagnosing dental erosion and offers suggestions for preventive interventions, including record-keeping, nutritional counseling, fluoride use, and home-care procedures. The course also discusses recommended restorative treatment options.

 

 

AGD Subject Code: 741

 
Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Recognize dental erosion and its causes.
  • Describe preventive interventions and restorative treatment options.
Author Bio(s)

 

Marion C. Manski, RDH, MS, has practiced clinical dental hygiene for more than 30 years. She is a graduate of the Forsyth School for Dental Hygienists, the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, and most recently the University of Maryland, Baltimore, where she earned her master’s degree. Ms. Manski is an associate professor in and the director of the Dental Hygiene Program, University of Maryland School of Dentistry. She provides clinical and didactic instruction to junior and senior dental hygiene students. Ms. Manski is also in private practice. Her research interests include nutrition, dental caries, and caries prevention.

J. Anthony von Fraunhofer, MSc, PhD, FADM, FRSC, is professor emeritus, University of Maryland Dental School, Baltimore, Maryland, where he also served as director of biomaterials research in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. He has written more than 400 scientific papers and 16 books, and contributed chapters to 15 monographs on dental biomaterials and materials science. Dr. von Fraunhofer is the author of the well-regarded monographs Dental Materials at a Glance and Research Writing in Dentistry, published by Wiley-Blackwell. His special interests are the biomechanical properties of materials used in medicine and dentistry, and the degradation, wear, and corrosion of materials in the biosystem.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

Simplifying Endodontics for Greater Predictability and Ease of Treatment

Price: $19.95 
Item # L0784  

Release Date: September 21, 2016

Expiration Date: September 20, 2019

 

Advances in the endodontic arena have elevated the quality of endodontic treatment that can be provided and have improved the long-term prognosis for the teeth treated. Rotary instrumentation, when introduced in the 1990s, enabled the standardization of canal preparations. Newly developed reciprocating files have improved upon traditional rotary files with respect to increased cyclic fatigue resistance and reduction in fracture. More recently, adhesive dentistry has moved into the endodontic realm with obturation materials that resist leakage. Bioceramic materials show promise in improving root canal sealing and reducing bacterial microleakage. Primary root canal therapy can expect a success rate of between 75.6% and 92.5%, depending on the preoperative status of the pulp. The desire for 100% successful endodontics has led to the development of new materials and methods. Each product is designed to help reduce treatment complications and improve outcomes.

This basic-level course discusses the importance of proper isolation and appropriate pre-access buildups. Proper access for endodontic treatment is also explained. The course describes effective strategies for cleaning and shaping the root canal system, followed by an outlining of the principles of obturation. The importance of the coronal restoration and access sealing for successful endodontic treatment is explained. Finally, the course brings all of these elements together in a case scenario, which, though it cannot cover all contingencies, can help the general dentist, as well as dental hygienists and dental assistants, to understand the basics of root canal therapy and the strategies involved in improving endodontic outcomes.  

 

 

AGD Subject Code: 070
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Discuss the importance of proper isolation and appropriate pre-access buildups.
  • Explain proper access for endodontic treatment.
  • Discuss effective strategies for cleaning and shaping the root canal system.
  • Summarize the principles of obturation.
  • Explain the importance of the coronal restoration and access sealing.
Author Bio(s)

 

Brian C. Warner, DMD, received his bachelor of science degree with honors from the University of Michigan. He later graduated magna cum laude and received his doctorate of dental medicine from Tufts University School of Dental Medicine. At Tufts, Dr. Warner earned honors for high performance on the National Board Exams, merit scholarships for exceptional academic performance, and membership in the prestigious Omicron Kappa Upsilon dental honor society. After 3 years working in general practice, Dr. Warner returned to school to earn his specialty certificate in endodontics from New York University (NYU) College of Dentistry. While at NYU, his peers selected him to serve as chief resident. He is an active member of the American Association of Endodontics, the American Dental Association, the New York State Dental Association, and the New York County Dental Society. Dr. Warner is a Diplomate of the American Board of Endodontics.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Raymond K. Martin, DDS, MAGD, graduated in 1979 from Texas Tech University with a bachelor’s degree in microbiology and earned his DDS in 1983 from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. He then went on to study at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine in the General Practice Residency Program. Dr. Martin began his work in dental risk management after being awarded a Mastership in the Academy of General Dentistry. He consults with 20 legal firms as an expert witness and lectures extensively on dental risk management and ethics in dentistry. In addition, Dr. Martin teaches CAD/CAM dentistry as a CEREC mentor and has served as a Key Opinion Leader for an international dental implant manufacturer. Dr. Martin has maintained a private practice for more than three decades and is currently president of the Massachusetts Dental Society. He has served the American Dental Association on the Future of Dentistry work group and is currently a member of the Council on Government Affairs.

Chemical Dependency and Substance Abuse: A Review for the Dental Professional, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0789  

Release Date: July 30, 2013

Review Date: November 2, 2016

Expiration Date: November 1, 2019

 

In 2013, an estimated 24.6 million Americans aged 12 or older – 9.4 percent of the population – had used an illicit drug, and an estimated 22.7 million Americans (8.6 percent) needed treatment for a problem related to drugs or alcohol. In 2015, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration made more than 31,000 drug-related arrests, and in 2014, seized nearly 3,000 kg of methamphetamine and close to 50,000 dosage units of hallucinogens.

Chemical dependency and substance abuse affect all segments of the population. Dentists will encounter these problems among their patients, and should be able to recognize the signs and symptoms of substance abuse, as well as serve as a resource for these patients.  

This basic-level course reviews commonly misused substances, discusses their origins, and details the physical effects they can produce. Special consideration is given to substances commonly available in the dental office and the medications dental professionals may administer and prescribe. The course also highlights the signs and symptoms of drug abuse, slang associated with misused and abused substances, and the common routes of administration for each substance so that dental professionals will be able to identify patients who may be abusing certain substances.

It is vital that dental professionals become familiar with these substances and their effects, not only to recognize substance abuse, but also in order to take necessary precautions during treatment and when prescribing medications. Psychoactive substances, stimulants, sedatives, hallucinogens, opiates, and a wide range of inhalants can produce a variety of short-term and long-term effects, including tachycardia, hallucination, euphoria, brain damage, fatal respiratory and circulatory depression, psychosis, cancer, liver disease, and death.

 

 

AGD Subject Code: 157
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Discuss tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), its effects, and medical applications.
  • Identify legal and illegal stimulants and their effects.
  • Describe different sedatives, their effects, and dental considerations.
  • Identify common hallucinogens and their effects.
  • Describe the effects of different opioids, including dental analgesics.
  • Identify common inhalants and their effects.
Author Bio(s)

 

Ronald M. Mancini, DDS, received his bachelor’s degree from Emory University, and went on to earn his DDS degree from the same institution. He maintains a private dental practice in Bethesda, Maryland. He is a member of the American Dental Association (ADA), the Maryland State Dental Association (MSDA), and the Southern Maryland Dental Society (SMDS). Dr. Mancini has held several positions with the SMDS, including those of trustee, president, vice president, treasurer, and editor, and has served as a delegate and head of the delegation to the MSDA House of Delegates.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

Third Molar Surgery, 2nd Edition

Price: $19.95 
Item # L0791  

Release Date: July 30, 2013

Review Date: November 3, 2016

Expiration Date: November 2, 2019

 

Treatment philosophy toward extraction of third molars (wisdom teeth) varies in different developed countries. It ranges from observation in many countries in Europe to a prophylactic removal approach in the United States. A more proactive stance on often asymptomatic wisdom teeth extraction takes into consideration chronic inflammation that is related to the impacted wisdom teeth and its influence on the patient’s overall health; age of the patient; relative ease of early extraction (before full root development); difficulty of removal/type of impaction; and proximity to the inferior alveolar nerve, lingual nerve, and maxillary sinus. Such preventive surgical treatment can be done under local anesthesia, oral sedation with or without nitrous oxide inhalation sedation or intravenous sedation, with the level of sedation corresponding to the nature of the surgery and the patient’s level of anxiety about the procedure.

This basic-level course provides a review of the classification of impactions of third molars and the common surgical instruments and techniques employed for the extraction of impacted wisdom teeth. No surgical technique is without the potential for complications, and the most serious complications resulting from the extraction of wisdom teeth involve trauma to the inferior alveolar or lingual nerves, which can result in temporary or permanent adverse neurosensory changes. Using the empiric information presented in this course about impacted wisdom teeth, the potential difficulty of their extraction, and postsurgical complications, clinicians can determine whether their surgical expertise is at a high enough level for the extraction of an impacted wisdom tooth or if they should refer such patients to an oral surgeon.

 

 

AGD Subject Code: 310
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Explain the varied clinical presentations of third molars.
  • Cite the classification and surgical management of third molars.
  • List the risks and complications of third molar extractions.
  • Describe the treatment modalities and specific surgical techniques available for third molar surgery.
  • Outline established criteria for third molar removal in the United States.
  • List the benefits of a preventive strategy in relation to third molars.
Author Bio(s)

 

Len Tolstunov, DDS, is an assistant clinical professor in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of the Pacific School of Dentistry, San Francisco, California. He graduated from the University of the Pacific School of Dentistry with Honors in 1992 and in 1997 from the University of California San Francisco’s Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency Training Program. He is a Diplomate of the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, the American Board of Oral Implantology/Implant Dentistry, and the International Congress of Oral Implantologists. In addition, Dr. Tolstunov is a fellow of the American and California Associations of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons; a Fellow of the International Congress of Oral Implantologists; and a member of local and national dental and oral and maxillofacial surgery associations, including the American Dental Association, American Society of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, and the Academy of Osseointegration. Dr. Tolstunov has published more than 30 articles in peer-reviewed journals and has lectured nationally and internationally on bone grafting, ridge-split procedure, and other implant dentistry and oral surgery topics. He maintains a private practice in oral and maxillofacial surgery in San Francisco.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Mark J. Szarejko, DDS, FAGD, received a bachelor’s degree in biology from St. John Fisher College in Rochester, New York, and a DDS from the State University of New York at Buffalo in 1985. He has been a Fellow of the Academy of General Dentistry since 1994 and a Certified Correctional Healthcare Professional since 2007. Dr. Szarejko has more than 30 years of dental experience in New York and Florida. He is currently staff dentist at the Hillsborough County Jail in Tampa, Florida, and has been an examiner for the State of Florida dental and dental hygiene examinations since 1994. Dr. Szarejko has presented nationally on correctional healthcare and has authored more than 20 continuing education courses.

Prescription Drug Abuse Among Dental Patients: Scope, Prevention, and Management Considerations, Updated 1st Edition - 2 Hours

Price: $19.95 
Item # L0852  

Review Date: January 13, 2017

Expiration Date: January 12, 2020

Original Release Date: March 21, 2014

This basic-level course provides dental providers with an appreciation of the increasing scope of prescription drug abuse in the United States and a recognition that this problem, which crosses boundaries of gender, age, race, and socioeconomic status, is likely to exist within the patient populations they serve.

Dental providers frequently prescribe medications for their patients, especially for the control of pain. Although prescription drugs carry an aura of acceptability because they are legal and prescribed by professionals, the potential repercussions from using these drugs for reasons other than their intended purpose often go unrecognized by the user and unaddressed by the prescriber.

By becoming familiar with the basic pharmacology of the most commonly abused drugs, the risk factors for developing addictive behaviors and the manner in which these medications are commonly acquired, dental providers will be able to curb prescribing practices that contribute to this growing problem and better serve their patients and their communities as informed prevention advocates.

AGD Subject Code: 157

Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

Maryland DDS and RDH - Fulfills the prescribing & disposal of prescription drugs requirement in Maryland.

 

This course is an extract of, and should not be taken in conjunction with L0743 - Prescription Drug Abuse Among Dental Patients: Scope, Prevention, and Management Considerations, Updated 1st Edition (3 contact hours).

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the history and scope of prescription drug abuse and the role of the dental professional.
  • Define the terminology used in discussing prescription drug abuse.
  • Identify the prescription drugs that are most commonly abused and the extent and impact of their non-medical use.
  • Describe the populations most at risk for abusing prescription drugs and their access to these drugs.
  • Discuss the tactics and resources available to manage and prevent prescription drug abuse in the dental practice.
Author Bio(s)

 

Marnie Oakley, DMD, is the associate dean of clinical affairs at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine, from which she received her DMD in 1992. Dr. Oakley served in both active duty and reserve roles as a dental officer in the United States Navy. As an experienced educator, she has taught numerous courses related to clinical dentistry, including Oral Diagnosis and Treatment Planning, Clinical Restorative Dentistry, and the Clinical Responsibility course series. In addition to being a published author and presenter on the subject of prescription drug abuse, Dr. Oakley was responsible for the development and implementation of the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine Comprehensive Care Program. Dr. Oakley also served as Chair of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Annual Session Planning Committee for two consecutive years, for which she received a Presidential Citation. She served in officer positions in several ADEA committees and groups. Dr. Oakley maintains membership in numerous professional organizations, including the American Dental Association (ADA), Pennsylvania Dental Association (PDA), Western Pennsylvania Dental Association (WPDA), Omicron Kappa Upsilon, and the Academy of General Dentistry.

Jean O’Donnell, DMD, MSN, is the associate dean for for academic affairs at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine, from which she received her DMD in 1990. Within the same institution, she is an associate professor in the department of Restorative Dentistry and Comprehensive Care. Dr. O’Donnell holds a bachelor’s degree in nursing from Pennsylvania State University and a master’s degree in nursing from the University of Pittsburgh. She is a graduate of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Leadership Institute and currently serves as one of the university’s liaisons to the ADEA Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education. She is a member of Omicron Kappa Upsilon. Prescription drug abuse and tobacco cessation are among Dr. O’Donnell’s special interests.

Michael A. Zemaitis, PhD, holds a bachelor’s degree in pharmacy and a PhD in pharmacology. He is a professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences in the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy, and he teaches in the professional and graduate programs in the School of Pharmacy and the School of Dental Medicine. Dr. Zemaitis’s current area of research interest is biochemical pharmacology, with a special interest in drug and metabolite analysis in biological fluids. He actively supports several pharmacy-related policy issues, including “Project Life Line,” a program to have community pharmacies provide the narcotic antidote naloxone to high-risk opiate users to prevent overdose deaths.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Wayne McElhiney, DPh, DDS, is a 1966 graduate of the University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy and a 1974 graduate of the University of Tennessee College of Dentistry. He maintained a private practice for 25 years and is currently director of the Wellness Committee of the Tennessee Dental Association. Dr. McElhiney is a member of NAADAC, the Association of Addiction Professionals, and he serves on the Advisory Council of the University of Utah School on Alcoholism and Other Drug Dependencies. In 2012-2013, he served as a consultant for the American Dental Association Counsel on Dental Practice. He serves as a consultant for the Drug Formulating and Pain Regimen for Alive Hospice in Nashville, Tennessee. Dr. McElhiney is a noted lecturer and published author and is currently involved in teaching the disease concept of addiction at the University of Tennessee College of Dentistry, the University of Tennessee College of Dental Hygiene, and the Tennessee State University College of Dental Hygiene.

Malodor: Detection and Treatment, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0739  

Release Date: July 31, 2013

Review Date: May 18, 2016

Expiration Date: May 17, 2019

 

Chronic oral malodor, also referred to as halitosis, bad breath, mouth malodor, oral malodor, and fetor oris, is an unpleasant condition that is estimated to affect up to 50% of the population. This common condition is often distressing for patients, causing them social embarrassment and affecting their relationships and self-esteem. Given its prevalence and psychosocial effects, it is no surprise that malodor is one of the chief complaints reported to dental health providers. Effective management depends on identifying the origin of the malodor and instituting the appropriate treatment.

Appropriate for all dental professionals, this basic-level course describes the nature and prevalence of halitosis, reviews the steps for assessing a patient with halitosis, discusses the oral, nonoral, and systemic origins of halitosis, differential diagnosis, and treatment planning. The course also discusses the relationship between oral malodor and oral disease, including gingivitis and periodontitis. Case scenarios highlight the concepts presented and reinforce learning.

AGD Subject Code: 739
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the nature and prevalence of halitosis.
  • Recognize the steps taken in assessing a patient with halitosis.
  • Identify the oral, nonoral, and systemic origins of halitosis.
  • Identify the dental differential diagnosis for halitosis.
  • Outline the dental treatment and management of halitosis.
Author Bio(s)

 

A. J. Barnert, RDH, has been involved in aiding the community since attending the University of Southern California while working toward her bachelor of science degree in dental hygiene. From developing dental health programs in public schools and for underserved children to working for Counseling4Kids to help children in the foster care system, Ms. Barnert has given back to the community in numerous ways. In addition to her undergraduate degree, she also received her master of arts degree in marriage, family, and child counseling from Phillips Graduate Institute in Encino, California, and is a certified children’s social worker. Currently, Ms. Barnert maintains her own private practice, and works with Counseling4Kids, United Behavioral Health, and Wilshire Valley Therapy, as well as for the dentists Robert Wong and Kanako Shimizu in Woodland Hills, California. She is a member of both the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists and the California Family Study Center Alumni Association. As a public speaker, she has presented workshops on interventions to help the bereaved and published on the subject of divorce as an opportunity for growth.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

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