Disciplines: Dentists
Hours: 15 Contact Hours
Item#: LST15

 

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Restorative Dentistry Bundle


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Just $104.95
Item # LST15
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This bundle of six continuing education courses for dentists provides 15 credit hours of foundational knowledge related to restorative dentistry. Professionals in nearly all general dentistry and specialized dentistry practices will encounter patients requiring restorative dental work, and it is imperative for professionals to follow current best practices in procedures involving metals, lasers, dental cements, and implants.

This product includes the following courses:
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Pros and Cons of Amalgam Versus Composite Restoration, Updated 1st Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0786  

Release Date: July 30, 2013

Review Date: October 6, 2016

Expiration Date: October 5, 2019

 

For many years, the only available choices for restorations were metal- or ceramic-based materials. However, in the past few decades significant advances have been made in restorative materials and in the bonding systems for retaining a restoration in the prepared tooth. These changes have brought additional direct restorative materials (such as newer generations of composite resins), as well as new indirect restorative materials (such as lithium disilicate and zirconia). Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing have changed the way that clinical dentistry is practiced, and the practitioner’s utilization of dental materials has evolved with these advances. As a result of these changes, practitioners have shown greater interest in resin composite materials and other amalgam alternatives because of perceived cosmetic, clinical, and health issues with amalgam. This course is designed for dental assistants, dental hygienists, and dentists interested in a review of current materials used for tooth restoration.

This basic-level course addresses the pros and cons of placing mercury-containing amalgam restorations and the most commonly used alternative (composite resin); reviews current materials used for tooth restorations; gives an historical perspective; discusses the positions of authoritative bodies on the safety efficacy compatibility and serviceability of mercury-amalgam restorations; summarizes recent research comparing amalgam versus composite restorations; describes a number of safety issues that have arisen regarding the use of composite resins; and discusses clinical and cost comparisons of resin composites and amalgam restorations.

 

 

 

AGD Subject Code: 251
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Discuss the history of amalgam and composite resin restorations.
  • Identify the safety issues and controversies associated with amalgams.
  • Identify the safety issues and controversies associated with composite resins.
  • Compare the clinical features of amalgams and composite resin restorations.
Author Bio(s)

 

Evan B. Rosen, DMD, MPH, is a maxillofacial prosthodontist and lecturer at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine. Dr. Rosen completed his master’s degree in public health at Florida International University, his doctor of dental medicine degree at the University of Florida College of Dentistry, and his prosthodontics residency at the Eastman Institute for Oral Health in Rochester, New York. Dr. Rosen continued his professional training by completing a fellowship in maxillofacial prosthetics at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. Dr. Rosen is actively engaged in research focusing on quality of life outcomes and the management of medically complex patients. 

John F. Kross, DMD, MSc, received his doctorate in dental medicine from Temple University School of Dentistry in Philadelphia. He completed a fellowship at Temple University Hospital in oral oncology and received a hospital appointment to the Department of Dentistry at the Medical Centers of Delaware (now the Christiana Health Care System). His professional training and experience include practicing general dentistry in Wilmington, Delaware, and in New London, Pennsylvania, as well as instructing students at Delaware Technical Community College in oral pathology. Dr. Kross has received numerous academic awards for his work in oral surgery, fixed partial prosthodontics, periodontics, and endodontics. He has been composing monographs, manuscripts, and continuing medical education courses since 1991.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

Lasers in Dentistry: From Fundamentals to Clinical Procedures, 2nd Edition

Price: $19.95 
Item # L0884  

Review Date: January 10, 2018

Expiration Date: January 9, 2021

Original Release Date: January 13, 2012

This is a basic laser operations course for every member of the dental team. This course provides outlines for safety regulations, discusses varying laser instruments, and the unique effects of laser energy on oral tissue. It also compares benefits and drawbacks of laser use. Several different clinical procedures are included with raw photo documentation. Every laser device is especially designed for a unique dental condition. A practicing clinician must understand each these devices and their power to interact with their target tissues. Whether the laser is removing decay, reshaping the gingiva, removing lesions or used in a whitening procedure, the same underlying principle of laser use apply. In this course, the fundamental principle taught is that the least amount of energy or power should be used to reach the specific treatment outcome.

 

AGD Subject Code: 752

Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Discuss the evolving use of lasers in the field of dentistry and their fundamental components.
  • Explain how lasers interact with oral tissues.
  • Describe the lasers currently available for use in dentistry and their specific clinical applications.
  • Identify recommended laser safety protocols.
  • Recognize the benefits and drawbacks of using lasers in dentistry.
  • Discuss the use of lasers in various dental specialties.
Author Bio(s)

Donald J. Coluzzi, DDS, is a health science clinical professor in the Department of Preventive and Restorative Dental Sciences at the University of California, San Francisco, School of Dentistry. Dr. Coluzzi received his DDS from the University of Southern California School of Dentistry in 1970 and was in general practice for more than 35 years. He is a charter member and past president of the Academy of Laser Dentistry (ALD), a former editor-in-chief of the Journal of Laser Dentistry, a Fellow of the American College of Dentists, and a Master of the Academy of Laser Dentistry. The ALD presented him with the 1999 Leon Goldman Award for Clinical Excellence and the 2006 Distinguished Service Award. Dr. Coluzzi has used dental lasers since early 1991 and has earned Advanced Proficiency in Nd:YAG and Er:YAG wavelengths. He has presented around the world on the subject of lasers, co-authored three books, contributed textbook chapters, and published several peer-reviewed articles.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Jeanette Miranda, RDH, BSDH, received her associate’s degree in dental hygiene from Indiana University at South Bend (IUSB) and her bachelor’s degree in dental hygiene from Minnesota State University, Mankato. She has practiced dental hygiene for more than 35 years in four states and was a clinical hygiene instructor at IUSB. She has attained Standard Proficiency and Fellowship status in the diode laser with the World Clinical Laser Institute, as well as Standard Proficiency, Advanced Proficiency, and Mastership status with the Academy of Laser Dentistry. Currently, Jeanette is employed as a clinical hygienist and serves the Academy of Laser Dentistry as co-chair of the Communication Committee and chair of the Auxiliary Committee. She is a past-president of the South Dakota Dental Hygienists’ Association and lectures on dental lasers. 

Allergic Reactions to Metals in the Mouth, 2nd Edition

Price: $19.95 
Item # L0797  

Release Date: July 30, 2013

Review Date: November 11, 2016

Expiration Date: November 10, 2019

 

A wide variety of materials used for the construction of dental restorations, prostheses, and dental implants have the potential to cause allergic reactions among dental patients. Rates of metal sensitivity are thought to increase with exposure, and an estimated 15% to 20% of people within the western population are considered hypersensitive to at least one metal. Reported effects include intraoral redness, swelling and pain of the oral mucosa and lips, oral/gingival lichenoid reactions, stomatitis, cheilitis, extraoral urticarial or eczematous lesions. Increasing numbers of patients complain about intraoral and extraoral lesions, metallic taste, and skin reactions, which may be related to the dental materials used for restorations.

Hypersensitivity to metals in biomaterials used in dentistry and medicine requires all dental professionals to be aware of metals that patients may be allergic to and to exercise caution when selecting restorative materials. This basic-level course reviews the importance of metals for human health, identifies common harmful metals and their role in disease, and discusses hypersensitivity reactions, with particular regard to metal allergies in medical and dental patients. Corrosion is also discussed relative to its role in the hypersensitivity reactions experienced by dental patients. Chronic exposure to metal corrosion in the oral environment has been associated with swelling, bone resorption, oral lesions, and oral cancer in individuals who are hypersensitive to metals.  For these reasons, it is imperative that dental professionals understand the different types of metals used in biomaterials, factors that increase corrosion susceptibility of dental restorations, and corrosion’s potential to increase patient hypersensitive to metals. Doing so will help dental professionals make more informed decisions about which biomaterials are the safest and most effective.

 

 

AGD Subject Code: 017

Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the essential role of metals in human health.
  • Identify metals that are harmful to human health.
  • Explain the relationship between hypersensitivity and metals.
  • Describe the process of metallic corrosion.
  • Describe the impact of metallic corrosion in the oral environment.
Author Bio(s)

 

J. Anthony von Fraunhofer, MSc, PhD, FRSC, is professor emeritus, University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore, where he also served as director of biomaterials research in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. He has written more than 400 scientific papers and 16 books, and contributed chapters to 15 monographs on dental biomaterials and materials science. Dr. von Fraunhofer is the author of the well-regarded monographs Dental Materials at a Glance and Research Writing in Dentistry, published by Wiley-Blackwell. His special interests are the biomechanical properties of materials used in medicine and dentistry and the degradation, wear, and corrosion of materials in the biosystem.

Patricia W. Kihn, DDS, is a dentist in private practice in Halethorpe, Maryland. In addition to more than 25 years of dental experience, Dr. Kihn has served as a director of regulatory clinical support activities and corporate complaint officer for DENTSPLY and has been an adjunct faculty member in the Department of Restorative Dentistry at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Toni M. Roucka, RN, DDS, MA, is an associate professor of restorative dentistry at Southern Illinois University, School of Dental Medicine, Edwardsville. She maintains an active nursing license and is a Fellow of the American College of Dentists and immediate past president of the American Society for Dental Ethics. Dr. Roucka obtained her DDS degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry and master’s degree in population health – bioethics from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Roucka is a nationally recognized speaker on the subject of ethics in dentistry and has taught restorative dentistry at both Marquette University and the Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine. As a volunteer, she has provided dental care to underserved populations in Guatemala, Venezuela, the Dominican Republic, and Tanzania.

Dental Erosion: Causes and Preventative Practices, 2nd Edition

Price: $19.95 
Item # L0781  

Release Date: July 30, 2013

Review Date: September 19, 2016

Expiration Date: September 18, 2019

Dental erosion is a progressive loss of dental hard tissue caused by chemical processes without involvement of bacteria. This enamel dissolution is an irreversible process not directly associated with mechanical or traumatic factors, which distinguishes it from other types of wear, such as attrition (loss of tooth structure due to clenching or grinding), abrasion (mechanical loss of tooth structure caused by a foreign element), or abfraction (loss of tooth structure at the gumline due to occlusal forces). The clinical features of dental erosion appear as well-defined, wedge-shaped areas facially and cervically. The occurrence of enamel erosion lesions is associated primarily with intrinsic and extrinsic acids.

The rise in consumption of soft drinks, including sports drinks, has been linked to increases in the rates of dental erosion. The additives to these drinks, not the beverage pH per se, appear to be the causative factors contributing to enamel dissolution. Furthermore, fruit-flavored drinks and unsweetened juices appear to have the same erosive potential as carbonated drinks.

This basic-level course provides dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants with guidelines for recognizing and diagnosing dental erosion and offers suggestions for preventive interventions, including record-keeping, nutritional counseling, fluoride use, and home-care procedures. The course also discusses recommended restorative treatment options.

 

 

AGD Subject Code: 741

 
Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Recognize dental erosion and its causes.
  • Describe preventive interventions and restorative treatment options.
Author Bio(s)

 

Marion C. Manski, RDH, MS, has practiced clinical dental hygiene for more than 30 years. She is a graduate of the Forsyth School for Dental Hygienists, the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, and most recently the University of Maryland, Baltimore, where she earned her master’s degree. Ms. Manski is an associate professor in and the director of the Dental Hygiene Program, University of Maryland School of Dentistry. She provides clinical and didactic instruction to junior and senior dental hygiene students. Ms. Manski is also in private practice. Her research interests include nutrition, dental caries, and caries prevention.

J. Anthony von Fraunhofer, MSc, PhD, FADM, FRSC, is professor emeritus, University of Maryland Dental School, Baltimore, Maryland, where he also served as director of biomaterials research in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. He has written more than 400 scientific papers and 16 books, and contributed chapters to 15 monographs on dental biomaterials and materials science. Dr. von Fraunhofer is the author of the well-regarded monographs Dental Materials at a Glance and Research Writing in Dentistry, published by Wiley-Blackwell. His special interests are the biomechanical properties of materials used in medicine and dentistry, and the degradation, wear, and corrosion of materials in the biosystem.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

Permanent Dental Cements

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0803  

Release Date: December 13, 2016

Expiration Date: December 12, 2019

Dental professionals practicing restorative dentistry often delve into prosthodontics to meet the needs of their dental patients. However, the failure of their fixed prostheses is not uncommon. With a major obstacle to the success of these prostheses being improper or inadequate materials or cementation technique, it is increasingly apparent that knowledge of permanent dental cements is essential for any restorative practice. Although it is important to understand the various classifications of luting agents, it is crucial to be aware of the factors that must be considered when selecting a luting agent for a particular clinical presentation, as well as the indications for each type of luting agent.

This basic-level course identifies the etiology of crown and bridge failure, reviews both conventional and contemporary permanent dental luting agents for fixed restorations and their chemical and mechanical properties, factors to consider in their selection, handling characteristics, advantages, disadvantages, and clinical applications. By familiarizing themselves with the specifics of each type of dental luting agent, dental professionals will be better prepared to make effective decisions regarding the application and longevity of their patients’ restorations.

 

AGD Subject Code: 017

 

 

 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Identify the etiology of crown and bridge failure.
  • List the factors to consider in selecting a permanent dental cement.
  • Describe the classification of permanent dental cements.
  • Identify the properties, advantages, and disadvantages of conventional dental cements.
  • Identify the properties, advantages, and disadvantages of contemporary dental cements.
Author Bio(s)

 

Paola Cohen Imach, DDS, obtained her first dental degree from the Universidad Nacional de Tucuman, Argentina, in 1998. She obtained her U.S. dental degree from the New York University (NYU) College of Dentistry in 2006 and completed a general practice dentistry residency in 2007. She pursued specialty training in prosthodontics at Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine (2008-2011), followed by a one-year fellowship in maxillofacial prosthetics at the MD Anderson Cancer Center/University of Texas in Houston, Texas. She is a former clinical assistant professor in the department of prosthodontics, NYU College of Dentistry, where she was responsible for directing two courses for second- and third-year dental students and teaching in the dental clinics. She is a former attending physician (maxillofacial prosthodontist) at St. Joseph’s Regional Medical Center in Paterson, New Jersey, where she was an active member of the craniofacial team. She currently resides in Tampa, Florida, where she maintains a practice limited to prosthodontics.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Raymond K. Martin, DDS, MAGD, graduated in 1979 from Texas Tech University with a bachelor’s degree in microbiology and earned his DDS in 1983 from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. He then went on to study at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine in the General Practice Residency Program. Dr. Martin began his work in dental risk management after being awarded a Mastership in the Academy of General Dentistry. He consults with 20 legal firms as an expert witness and lectures extensively on dental risk management and ethics in dentistry. In addition, Dr. Martin teaches CAD/CAM dentistry as a CEREC mentor and has served as a Key Opinion Leader for an international dental implant manufacturer. Dr. Martin has maintained a private practice for more than three decades and is currently president of the Massachusetts Dental Society. He has served the American Dental Association on the Future of Dentistry work group and is currently a member of the Council on Government Affairs.

Dental Implants: Complications and Peri-Implant Diseases, 2nd edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0893  

Review Date: July 11, 2018

Expiration Date: July 11, 2021

Original Release Date: June 26, 2015

Dental implants are an established treatment modality in dentistry with a high rate of success and few complications. However, complications do occur despite careful treatment planning and meticulous execution of clinical procedures. Surgical complications that can occur include infection, bleeding, wound dehiscence, primary instability of the implant, neurosensory changes, and tissue emphysema. After the implant is osseointegrated, other complications may arise, including inflammatory peri-implant lesions. All these conditions increase the risk of poor outcomes, including implant loss. This intermediate-level course addresses complications associated with dental implants and reviews selective options for their management.

 

AGD Subject Code: 690

Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the characteristics, prevalence, etiology, and patient- and implant-related risk factors associated with peri-implant diseases.
  • Describe the screening and diagnosis of peri-implant diseases.
  • Describe the dental management of peri-implant diseases.
  • List the surgical complications associated with implant placement.
  • Identify the hard tissue complications associated with implant placement.
Author Bio(s)

John F. Kross, DMD, MSc, received his doctor of dental medicine degree from Temple University School of Dentistry in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He completed a fellowship at Temple University Hospital in oral oncology and received a hospital appointment to the Department of Dentistry at the Medical Centers of Delaware (now the Christiana Care Health System). His professional training and experience include practicing general dentistry in Wilmington, Delaware, and New London, Pennsylvania, as well as instructing students in oral pathology at Delaware Technical Community College. He has been composing monographs, creating manuscripts, and contributing to continuing dental education since 1991. Dr. Kross has received numerous academic awards for his work in oral surgery, fixed partial prosthodontics, periodontics, and endodontics.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Evan B. Rosen, DMD, MPH, is a maxillofacial prosthodontist at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine. Dr. Rosen completed his doctor of dental medicine degree at the University of Florida College of Dentistry and his prosthodontics residency at the Eastman Institute for Oral Health in Rochester, New York. Dr. Rosen continued his professional training by completing a fellowship in maxillofacial prosthetics at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. Dr. Rosen is actively engaged in research focusing on quality of life outcomes, and he maintains a faculty practice at the Harvard Dental Center with a focus on the treatment of medically complex patients.

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