Disciplines: Dentists
Hours: 10 Contact Hours
Item#: LRT10

 

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Restorative Dentistry Bundle


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Item # LRT10
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This product includes the following courses:
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Update of Concepts in Vital Tooth Whitening, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0727  

Release Date: December 3, 2010

Review Date: June 2, 2016

Expiration Date: June 1, 2019

 

Vital tooth whitening is an aesthetic and conservative treatment for discolored teeth. The popularity of vital tooth whitening has increased dramatically in recent years, as shown by the increased number of products and procedures introduced, ranging from at-home tray whitening and trayless whitening techniques – both dentist prescribed and over the counter (OTC) – to in-office 1-hour whitening systems. Recent years have also seen the rise of nondental options for vital tooth whitening. The increasing number of vital tooth-whitening techniques and materials has created a clinical challenge for dentists and other oral health providers seeking to balance effectiveness and safety. Proper patient selection for vital tooth whitening becomes even more important in this environment.

Most recently, there has been a push to find ways to accelerate and improve the delivery of the whitening process. These include a number of light sources believed to accelerate the breakdown of peroxide and thus speed up the whitening process. Research in this area is controversial, with the literature describing different conclusions about the benefits of light-activated whitening. The popularity of strip-based peroxide delivery represents a departure from the conventional use of a professionally supervised tray system and raises questions about safety and efficacy.

Patient demand for tooth whitening remains high, and oral health providers have more options for treatment, so it is important that clinicians evaluate which of these options is best for their patients. This basic-level course reviews concepts in vital tooth whitening, including recommendations in ADA guidelines; describes evolving issues in vital tooth whitening (e.g., measurement of color change, the color rebound effect, and safety issues); and explains the risk and benefits of established and new technologies.

 

AGD Subject Code: 781
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe evolving issues in vital tooth whitening, including measuring color change.
  • Explain prewhitening evaluations and mechanisms underlying vital tooth whitening.
  • Outline current vital tooth-whitening methods and materials.
  • Identify the color rebound effect and safety issues associated with vital tooth whitening.
Author Bio(s)

 

John F. Kross, MSc, DMD, received his doctorate in dental medicine from Temple University School of Dentistry in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He completed a fellowship at Temple University Hospital in oral oncology and received a hospital appointment to the Department of Dentistry at the Medical Centers of Delaware (now the Christiana Health Care System). His professional training and experience include practicing general dentistry in Wilmington, Delaware, and in New London, Pennsylvania, as well as instructing students at Delaware Technical Community College in oral pathology. Dr. Kross has received numerous academic awards for his work in oral surgery, fixed partial prosthodontics, periodontics, and endodontics. He has been composing monographs, manuscripts, and continuing medical education courses since 1991.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Raymond K. Martin, DDS, MAGD, graduated in 1979 from Texas Tech University with a bachelor’s degree in microbiology and earned his DDS in 1983 from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. He then went on to study at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine in the General Practice Residency Program. Dr. Martin began his work in dental risk management after being awarded a Mastership in the Academy of General Dentistry. He consults with 20 legal firms as an expert witness and lectures extensively on dental risk management and ethics in dentistry. In addition, Dr. Martin teaches CAD/CAM dentistry as a CEREC mentor and has served as a Key Opinion Leader for an international dental implant manufacturer. Dr. Martin has maintained a private practice for more than three decades and is currently president of the Massachusetts Dental Society. He has served the American Dental Association on the Future of Dentistry work group and is currently a member of the Council on Government Affairs.

Erosion-Related Tooth Wear: Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment, 2nd Edition

Price: $39.95 
Item # L0757  

Release Date: July 25, 2010

Review Date: July 11, 2016

Expiration Date: July 10, 2019

 

Tooth wear is defined as the loss of dental hard tissue by a chemical or mechanical process that does not involve bacteria. The mechanisms of tooth wear include erosion, attrition, abrasion, and abfraction. Dental erosion results from chemical processes and is an important cause of tooth tissue loss in both children and adults. The damage caused by erosion can be accelerated when it occurs in combination with attrition or abrasion.

Early recognition of tooth wear is essential to successful management and prevention of disease progression. The primary dental care team is in the ideal position to provide this care to patients with dental erosion and other forms of tooth wear. This intermediate-level course provides dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants with an overview of the etiology of tooth wear and explains the pathogenic processes involved in tooth erosion. It describes the necessary protocol for assessing erosion in patients and making a diagnosis. Preventive measures and treatment approaches are included.

 

AGD Subject Code: 741

 

 
Western Schools designates this activity for 4 continuing education credits.

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Explain the etiology of tooth wear and the pathogenic process of tooth erosion.
  • Describe the protocol in patient assessment and diagnosis of erosion.
  • Describe prevention and restorative treatment approaches for erosion-related tooth wear.
Author Bio(s)

 

John F. Kross, DMD, MSc, received his doctorate in dental medicine from Temple University School of Dentistry in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He completed a fellowship at Temple University Hospital in oral oncology and received a hospital appointment to the Department of Dentistry at the Medical Centers of Delaware (now the Christiana Health Care System). His professional training and experience include practicing general dentistry in Wilmington, Delaware, and in New London, Pennsylvania, as well as instructing students at Delaware Technical Community College in oral pathology. Dr. Kross has received numerous academic awards for his work in oral surgery, fixed partial prosthodontics, periodontics, and endodontics. He has been composing monographs, manuscripts, and continuing medical education courses since 1991.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

Dental Sealants: Clinical Considerations for Selection and Placement

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0777  

Release Date: August 23, 2016

Expiration Date: August 22, 2019

 

Sealants are seen as a major preventive intervention because of the high prevalence of pit and fissure caries. The teeth most at risk are the newly erupted first molars, because the enamel is in its formative stage of maturation. The ADA and AAPD recognize that, when applied properly, sealants can play an important role in the prevention of tooth decay.

This basic-level course reviews the latest research and recommendations regarding the use of dental sealants. The course discusses the epidemiology of caries disease and the materials currently used in dental sealants. Research findings on the effectiveness of sealants are presented, as well as the clinical considerations that must factor into any practitioner’s decision to use dental sealants. Techniques for actual placement of dental sealants are outlined along with information on post-placement evaluation and follow-up care. Finally, safety concerns, including systemic toxicity, are discussed.

 

 

AGD Subject Code: 257

 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Discuss the epidemiology of dental caries.
  • Identify the materials used for dental sealants.
  • Explain the effectiveness of dental sealants.
  • List the clinical considerations for dental sealants.
  • Discuss placement techniques for dental sealants.
  • Explain the safety of dental sealants.
Author Bio(s)

 

Elena Francisco, RDH, RDHAP, MSDH, received her bachelor of science degree in dental hygiene from Loma Linda University and her master’s degree in dental hygiene education from Idaho State University. She is currently an adjunct clinical instructor in dental hygiene at Carrington College in Sacramento, California. Prior to joining the faculty at Carrington College, Ms. Francisco was a clinical instructor in dental hygiene at the University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry, where she served as a CAMBRA resource for dental hygiene students. A licensed registered dental hygienist and registered dental hygienist in alternative practice, Ms. Francisco has practiced dental hygiene in California for more than 40 years. She has coauthored several journal articles on dental hygienists’ knowledge, attitudes, and practice behaviors regarding caries risk assessment and management. Ms. Francisco has been a member of the statewide Task Force on Oral Health for People with Special Needs, cofounding member of the Oral Health Awareness Society, and member of a local task force whose goal is to reduce early childhood caries. She volunteers dental hygiene services to the dentally underserved in California.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Toni M. Roucka, RN, DDS, MA, is an associate professor of restorative dentistry at Southern Illinois University, School of Dental Medicine, Edwardsville. She maintains an active nursing license and is a Fellow of the American College of Dentists and immediate past president of the American Society for Dental Ethics. Dr. Roucka obtained her DDS degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry and master’s degree in population health – bioethics from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Roucka is a nationally recognized speaker on the subject of ethics in dentistry and has taught restorative dentistry at both Marquette University and the Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine. As a volunteer, she has provided dental care to underserved populations in Guatemala, Venezuela, the Dominican Republic, and Tanzania.

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