Disciplines: Dental Hygienists
Hours: 10 Contact Hours
Item#: LHSPA

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Pennsylvania 10-Hour Dental Hygienist Bundle


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Just $69.95
Item # LHSPA
When available, the Online Course format is included with the hard copy, eBook, or audio book formats!

This pack satisfies all CE hours allowed through home study.

This product includes the following courses:
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Dental Erosion: Causes and Preventative Practices, 2nd Edition

Price: $19.95 
Item # L0781  

Release Date: July 30, 2013

Review Date: September 19, 2016

Expiration Date: September 18, 2019

Dental erosion is a progressive loss of dental hard tissue caused by chemical processes without involvement of bacteria. This enamel dissolution is an irreversible process not directly associated with mechanical or traumatic factors, which distinguishes it from other types of wear, such as attrition (loss of tooth structure due to clenching or grinding), abrasion (mechanical loss of tooth structure caused by a foreign element), or abfraction (loss of tooth structure at the gumline due to occlusal forces). The clinical features of dental erosion appear as well-defined, wedge-shaped areas facially and cervically. The occurrence of enamel erosion lesions is associated primarily with intrinsic and extrinsic acids.

The rise in consumption of soft drinks, including sports drinks, has been linked to increases in the rates of dental erosion. The additives to these drinks, not the beverage pH per se, appear to be the causative factors contributing to enamel dissolution. Furthermore, fruit-flavored drinks and unsweetened juices appear to have the same erosive potential as carbonated drinks.

This basic-level course provides dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants with guidelines for recognizing and diagnosing dental erosion and offers suggestions for preventive interventions, including record-keeping, nutritional counseling, fluoride use, and home-care procedures. The course also discusses recommended restorative treatment options.

 

 

AGD Subject Code: 741

 
Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Recognize dental erosion and its causes.
  • Describe preventive interventions and restorative treatment options.
Author Bio(s)

 

Marion C. Manski, RDH, MS, has practiced clinical dental hygiene for more than 30 years. She is a graduate of the Forsyth School for Dental Hygienists, the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, and most recently the University of Maryland, Baltimore, where she earned her master’s degree. Ms. Manski is an associate professor in and the director of the Dental Hygiene Program, University of Maryland School of Dentistry. She provides clinical and didactic instruction to junior and senior dental hygiene students. Ms. Manski is also in private practice. Her research interests include nutrition, dental caries, and caries prevention.

J. Anthony von Fraunhofer, MSc, PhD, FADM, FRSC, is professor emeritus, University of Maryland Dental School, Baltimore, Maryland, where he also served as director of biomaterials research in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. He has written more than 400 scientific papers and 16 books, and contributed chapters to 15 monographs on dental biomaterials and materials science. Dr. von Fraunhofer is the author of the well-regarded monographs Dental Materials at a Glance and Research Writing in Dentistry, published by Wiley-Blackwell. His special interests are the biomechanical properties of materials used in medicine and dentistry, and the degradation, wear, and corrosion of materials in the biosystem.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

Diabetes: Dental Management and Links to Periodontal Disease

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0785  

Release Date: October 7, 2016

Expiration Date: October 6, 2019

 

Diabetes mellitus, a chronic disease of metabolism, poses a significant public health challenge in the United States. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 29.1 million Americans, or 9.3% of the U.S. population, have diabetes. Of these people, 21 million have been diagnosed with diabetes, while 8.1 million remain undiagnosed. Approximately 1.7 million new cases are diagnosed each year. Appropriate management of the patient with diabetes by the dental team requires an understanding of the patient’s metabolic control, as well as the patient’s potential for and limitations related to response to treatment with current therapy. The dental team plays a vital role in the overall health care of patients with diabetes through recognition and treatment of their oral needs, especially regarding tooth loss and related periodontal conditions.

The purpose of this basic-level course is to equip dental professionals to recognize the classifications and classic signs and symptoms of diabetes mellitus, to grasp the relationship between periodontal disease and diabetes, and to identify periodontal and other oral manifestations associated with diabetes, including attachment loss, alveolar bone loss, gingivitis, xerostomia, and oral candidiasis. Moreover, this course discusses dental treatment considerations for patients with diabetes, adverse interactions between hypoglycemic medications and adjunct dental treatment medications, and emergency management procedures for patients with diabetes.

 

AGD Subject Code: 754
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the classic signs and symptoms of the different types of diabetes.
  • Explain the association between periodontal disease and diabetes.
  • Identify periodontal and other oral manifestations of diabetes.
  • List dental treatment considerations for diabetic patients.
  • Identify the potential adverse interactions between common oral hypoglycemic medications and medications used adjunctive to dental treatment.
  • Describe the emergency management of dental patients with diabetes.
Author Bio(s)

 

Mark J. Szarejko, DDS, FAGD, received a bachelor’s degree in biology from St. John Fisher College in Rochester, New York, and a DDS from the State University of New York at Buffalo in 1985. He has been a Fellow of the Academy of General Dentistry since 1994 and a Certified Correctional Healthcare Professional since 2007. Dr. Szarejko has more than 30 years of dental experience in New York and Florida. He is currently staff dentist at the Hillsborough County Jail in Tampa, Florida, and has been an examiner for the State of Florida dental and dental hygiene examinations since 1994. Dr. Szarejko has presented nationally on correctional health care and has authored more than 20 continuing education courses.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Raymond K. Martin, DDS, MAGD, graduated in 1979 from Texas Tech University with a bachelor’s degree in microbiology and earned his DDS in 1983 from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. He then went on to study at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine in the General Practice Residency Program. Dr. Martin began his work in dental risk management after being awarded a Mastership in the Academy of General Dentistry. He consults with 20 legal firms as an expert witness and lectures extensively on dental risk management and ethics in dentistry. In addition, Dr. Martin teaches CAD/CAM dentistry as a CEREC mentor and has served as a Key Opinion Leader for an international dental implant manufacturer. Dr. Martin has maintained a private practice for more than three decades and is currently president of the Massachusetts Dental Society. He has served the American Dental Association on the Future of Dentistry work group and is currently a member of the Council on Government Affairs.

Pediatric Oral Health: Early Childhood Caries and Chronic Disease Management

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0794  

Release Date: November 11, 2016

Expiration Date: November 10, 2019

 

Dental caries continues to be a chronic, infectious disease that may affect a person throughout his or her lifetime. Early childhood caries, a severe form of dental caries affecting infants and very young children, is the most prevalent disease of childhood. Among the objectives of Healthy People 2020 is the aim to reduce all decay in young children’s primary teeth.

Dental caries is a complex disease process with multifactorial etiology. Evidence-based management of the disease process involves shifting the balance between the protective factors (remineralization) and destructive factors (demineralization) toward remineralization of the enamel surface. Until recently, the standard of care was to provide restorative treatment once carious lesions manifested on or within the tooth. It is now accepted that surgical treatment alone falls short because it fails to address the underlying disease etiology. Dental professionals need to take an active role in the prevention and management of early childhood caries.

The purpose of this basic-level course is to review the epidemiology, etiology, and risk factors of early childhood caries in children. The focus is on prevention and management techniques for early childhood caries and on identifying the roles that dental professionals can play within the context of a chronic disease management model for care of patients with early childhood caries.

 

 

 

AGD Subject Code: 430

 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Explain the epidemiology of early childhood caries (ECC).
  • Discuss the etiology of ECC.
  • Identify the risk factors associated with ECC.
  • Explain the clinical manifestations of ECC.
  • Discuss the chronic disease management of ECC.
Author Bio(s)

 

Zameera Fida, DMD, is the director of Predoctoral Pediatric Dentistry at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine (HSDM) and a full-time staff member at Boston Children’s Hospital. She is board certified by the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. She received a BS in nutritional sciences from the University of Florida, where she conducted research analyzing the growth and diet of pediatric HIV patients. Dr. Fida received her DMD from HSDM, where her research involved the nutritional intake of children with and without severe early childhood caries. She received her certificate in pediatric dentistry from Boston Children’s Hospital, where her research focused on caries and adolescents’ intake of sugar-sweetened beverages. She is the course director and lecturer for the “Treatment of the Child and Adolescent” course at HSDM, which contains a comprehensive curriculum for dental students on managing patients – including those with special healthcare needs – throughout infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Dr. Fida is a reviewer for Pediatric Dentistry and Journal of Dental Education and is a member of the American Dental Association, American Association of Pediatric Dentistry, Massachusetts Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, and Massachusetts Dental Society. Her current research interests include trauma, dental education, and caries prevention.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Elena Francisco, RDH, RDHAP, MSDH, received her bachelor of science degree in dental hygiene from Loma Linda University and her master’s degree in dental hygiene education from Idaho State University. She is currently an adjunct clinical instructor in dental hygiene at Carrington College in Sacramento, California. Prior to joining the faculty at Carrington College, Ms. Francisco was a clinical instructor in dental hygiene at the University of the Pacific’s Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry, where she served as a CAMBRA resource for dental hygiene students. A licensed registered dental hygienist and registered dental hygienist in alternative practice, Ms. Francisco has practiced dental hygiene in California for more than 40 years. She has coauthored several journal articles on dental hygienists’ knowledge, attitudes, and practice behaviors regarding caries risk assessment and management. Ms. Francisco has been a member of the statewide Task Force on Oral Health for People with Special Needs and is a cofounding member of the Oral Health Awareness Society and a member of a local task force whose goal is to reduce early childhood caries. She volunteers dental hygiene services to the dentally underserved in California.

Pennsylvania Child Abuse Recognition and Reporting, 2nd Edition

Price: $19.95 
Item # L0882  

Release Date: May 22, 2017

Expiration Date: May 22, 2020

This course offers an overview of the historically evolving role of mandated reporters and a description of child welfare services in Pennsylvania. It provides provides dental professionals with details of the legal requirements imposed on mandated reporters of child abuse. The course defines the statutory (legal) components of child abuse, including what does and does not constitute child abuse. The course outlines the provisions and responsibilities for reporting such abuse by distinguishing between individuals designated as “mandatory reporters” and those deemed to be “permissive reporters.” Clear instructions are provided for navigating the reporting process, and the ways in which reporters are protected under the law are outlined. Lastly, the course details the indicators essential to recognizing abuse. Human trafficking is also addressed, including child labor trafficking and sex trafficking, and the risk factors and warning signs for both. The course provides dental professionals in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania with the knowledge and tools they need to fulfill their legal responsibility to report suspected child abuse.

This course fulfills the requirement that all Pennsylvania dental professionals complete 2 hours of Board-approved continuing education in child abuse recognition and reporting requirements as a condition of their license renewal. 

 

Pennsylvania - Pre-approved by the PA Dept. of Public Welfare and the PA Dept. of Professional & Occupational Affairs to fulfill the 2 hour child abuse recognition and reporting CE requirement.

 
NOTE: In order to submit your course completion record to the Pennsylvania Department of State, the name on your account MUST be an exact match to the name on your license. If the name that appears on your account is different, please call 1-800-953-8731 to have your account updated.

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the evolution of child protection legislation in the United States.
  • Describe the child welfare system in Pennsylvania.
  • Identify the components and categories of child abuse as defined by Pennsylvania law.
  • Describe the provisions and responsibilities for reporting suspected child abuse in Pennsylvania.
  • Recognize the indicators of child abuse.
Author Bio(s)

 

Frank P. Cervone, JD, MA, has been the executive director of the Support Center for Child Advocates – the oldest and largest U.S. program dedicated to providing free legal and social services for abused and neglected children – since 1992. He served on the Board of the Children’s Trust Fund of Pennsylvania for 10 years, and has been a member of the Board of Directors for the Philadelphia Children’s Alliance since 1992. From 1998 to 2011, Mr. Cervone was a member of the American Bar Association Section of Litigation Children’s Rights Litigation Committee Working Group. He received a master’s degree in theology and ministry from La Salle University and a juris doctor degree from Villanova University School of Law. He has authored scholarly publications as well as articles in Pittsburgh and Philadelphia newspapers concerning the rights and protection of children and youth. Mr. Cervone has received many awards in recognition of his legal expertise and public service.

Meghan E. Johnson, MPH, is the project manager of the Center for Excellence in Advocacy at the Support Center for Child Advocates in Philadelphia. In this capacity, she develops, coordinates, and delivers advanced training programs to victim service providers and legal professionals throughout Pennsylvania. Previously she served as a program coordinator for the New Jersey chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics, where her work involved developing, coordinating, and delivering training programs focused on evidence-based practices for evaluating and reporting suspected child abuse and neglect cases for pediatric healthcare providers, medical residents, emergency medical technicians, school nurses, and early intervention providers. Ms. Johnson received her bachelor’s degree in sociology from the University of Notre Dame, with a minor in public policy through the University’s Hesburgh Program in Public Service. She received her master’s degree in public health from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health.

Erin E. Coltrera, LSW, MSSP, is the project manager of Project PROTECT (Philadelphia Response and Outreach To End Child Trafficking) at the Support Center for Child Advocates in Philadelphia. Project PROTECT takes a four-pronged approach to meeting the challenges faced by youth who have experienced trafficking, including the development of a tailored model of representation, a focus on local resource development, research on macro-level advocacy avenues, and analysis of existing prevention programs. In addition to her program work, Ms. Coltrera specializes in the representation of clients with histories of trafficking and exploitation. Ms. Coltrera received her bachelor’s degree in accounting from Washington and Lee University. She received a master’s degree in social work and a master of science in social policy from the University of Pennsylvania, where she received the Carol Wilson-Spigner Award for Social Policy Excellence.

 

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