Disciplines:
  • Dentists
  • Dental Hygienists
  • Dental Assisting
  • Hours: 14 Contact Hours
    Item#: LOS14

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    Online Access to all our dental CE courses for a full year!

    Oral Surgery Bundle #2: 14 hours


    Reg. Prices
    Just $97.95
    Item # LOS14
    When available, the Online Course format is included with the hard copy, eBook, or audio book formats!

    This product includes the following courses:
    Click on the title to see more and read the course

    Implant-Related Nerve Injuries

    Price: $29.95 
    Item # L0748  

    Release Date: June 7, 2016

    Expiration Date: June 6, 2019

     

    According to the American Academy of Implant Dentistry there are currently 3 million people in the United States with dental implants, and that number is growing by 500,000 per year. While the success rate of implants has been reported to be 98%, there are still some risks involved. Because of their ability to restore esthetics and function, dental implants have become the preferred option for replacing nonrestorable and missing teeth. Despite high success rates, however, many complications have been encountered with their use.

    One of the most serious complications is the alteration of sensation after implant placement in the posterior mandible. The prevalence of this type of a complication has been reported to be as high as 13%. This sensatory change can occur as a result of injury to the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) or the lingual nerve from traumatic local anesthetic injections or during dental implant osteotomy or placement. This complication is one of the most unpleasant experiences for both the patient and the dentist, so every precaution should be taken to avoid it. Once it happens, the dentist should provide the patient with appropriate care and should know when to refer the patient to a microneurosurgeon. Depending on the degree of nerve injury, alteration in sensation varies from mild paresthesia to complete anesthesia. Injuries sustained may be transient, manageable, or, in certain cases, permanent.

    This intermediate-level course familiarizes dental professionals with different types of nerve injuries related to implant placement and their causes, and the areas within the oral cavity at increased risk for such injuries. The course discusses how the dental professional can properly plan implant placement to avoid nerve injury and how to treat nerve injuries if they do occur.

    AGD Subject Code: 690
     
    Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

     

    Disclosures
    • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
    • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
    • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
    • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
    • There are no prerequisites for this course.
    Objectives

    Course Objectives

    • Differentiate among the types of nerve injuries.
    • Explain the mechanisms that cause nerve injury related to implant placement.
    • Identify the anatomical areas that present more risks when placing implants.
    • Recognize the strategies used to avoid nerve injury during implant placement.
    • Explain how to manage implant-related nerve injuries.
    Author Bio(s)

     

    Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

     

    Content Editor

    Complications Associated With Oral Surgery, 2nd Edition

    Price: $29.95 
    Item # L0742  

    Release Date: July 31, 2013

    Release Date: June 2, 2016

    Expiration Date: June 1, 2019

     

    This course addresses common complications associated with oral surgical procedures and outlines the evidence-based methods to prevent, minimize, or manage them. Patient education about what to expect postoperatively helps minimize emergency after-hours phone calls and the need for additional treatment. Proper techniques of postoperative pain or infection control may also facilitate the healing process and reduce both postoperative complications for patients and stress for practitioners.

    This basic-level course for dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants will strengthen the dental team’s ability to identify common complications associated with oral surgery procedures and minimize, manage, and treat postoperative complications.

     

    AGD Subject Code: 310
     
    Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

     

     

    Disclosures
    • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
    • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
    • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
    • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
    • There are no prerequisites for this course.
    Objectives

    Course Objectives

    • Identify common complications associated with oral surgery procedures.
    • Discuss methods to minimize, manage, and treat postoperative complications.
    Author Bio(s)

     

    Ellen Dietz-Bourguignon, BS, CDA-Emeritus, earned her bachelor of science degree in allied health education in dental auxiliary utilization and a community college teaching certificate from the State University of New York at Buffalo. She began her dental career as an associate-degreed certified dental assistant in private practice. Following a 7-year dental assisting teaching career at Orange County Community College, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Erie County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, and Niagara County Community College, she began writing on dental topics for Dental Assisting Magazine, eventually rising to the position of managing editor. Ms. Dietz-Bourguignon has worked in dental marketing, project management, and product development at Semantodontics and in legal administration for the Arizona State Board of Dental Examiners. She has published five books in the dental assisting market, including Dental Office Management and Safety Standards and Infection Control for Dental Assistants, and has been keynote speaker at the American Dental Assistants Association Annual Session. Her articles have appeared in numerous journals, including The Dental Assistant, Dentist, The Dental Student, Dental Economics, RDH, and Dental Teamwork.

     

    Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

    Raymond K. Martin, DDS, MAGD, graduated in 1979 from Texas Tech University with a bachelor’s degree in microbiology and earned his DDS in 1983 from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. He then went on to study at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine in the General Practice Residency Program. Dr. Martin began his work in dental risk management after being awarded a Mastership in the Academy of General Dentistry. He consults with 20 legal firms as an expert witness and lectures extensively on dental risk management and ethics in dentistry. In addition, Dr. Martin teaches CAD/CAM dentistry as a CEREC mentor and has served as a Key Opinion Leader for an international dental implant manufacturer. Dr. Martin has maintained a private practice for more than three decades and is currently president of the Massachusetts Dental Society. He has served the American Dental Association on the Future of Dentistry work group and is currently a member of the Council on Government Affairs.

    Developmental Disorders Affecting Jaws

    Price: $49.95 
    Item # L0747  

    Release Date: June 9, 2016

    Expiration Date: June 8, 2019

     

    Anomalies of tooth development are relatively common and may occur as an isolated condition or in association with other anomalies. Developmental dental anomalies often exhibit patterns that reflect the stage of development during which the malformation occurs. Developmental defects or disorders may affect teeth size, number, or shape; enamel, dentin, and cementum may also be affected.

    Heritable dental developmental anomalies can have profound negative consequences for the affected individual and the family, ranging from esthetic concerns that impact self-esteem to masticatory difficulties, tooth sensitivity, financial burdens, and protracted, complex dental treatment.

    This intermediate-level course familiarizes dental professionals with developmental disorders of the jaws and teeth.  Because some presentations of developmental anomalies are associated with a larger systemic syndrome, it is important for dental practitioners to recognize these disorders early so that the patient may be treated accordingly or referred to an appropriate specialist if surgery is required.  

     

    AGD Subject Codes: 310
     
    Western Schools designates this activity for 5 continuing education credits.

     

     

    Disclosures
    • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
    • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
    • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
    • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
    • There are no prerequisites for this course.
    Objectives

    Course Objectives

    • Recognize developmental defects that affect teeth size.
    • Identify developmental disorders that affect teeth number.
    • List developmental disorders affecting teeth shape.
    • Describe conditions affecting teeth enamel.
    • Recognize developmental defects that affect dentin.
    • Describe defects of the cementum.
    • Identify the different developmental disorders of the jaws.
    • Discuss genetic conditions affecting the jaws.
    Author Bio(s)

     

    Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

     

    Content Editor

    Oral Soft Tissue Lesions: Diagnosis and Treatment, 2nd Edition

    Price: $29.95 
    Item # L0771  

    Release Date: July 31, 2013

    Review Date: August 4, 2016

    Expiration Date: August 3, 2019

     

    The oral cavity is an ideal place for microorganisms to grow. Many distinct bacterial groups live in the oral cavity, and some of these bacteria are considered to be part of the normal oral flora. Unfortunately, some of these common bacterial species can also be the cause of opportunistic infections (infections by species that are avirulent in healthy individuals but that can be fatal in patients with compromised immunity. It is important to be aware of the causes of common lesions found in the oral cavity so they can be properly diagnosed and treated.

    This basic-level course reviews the soft tissue lesions found in the oral cavity of adults and discusses their diagnosis and treatment. Common problems include inflammatory and infectious processes, degenerative processes, and abnormal growths.

     

     

    AGD Subject Code: 739
     
    Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

     

     

    Disclosures
    • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
    • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
    • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
    • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
    Objectives

    Course Objectives

    • List the normal structures in the oral cavity identified during intra- and extraoral assessments.
    • Explain the inflammation process in the oral mucosa in relation to soft tissue lesions.
    • Describe the etiology of neoplasms and premalignant conditions in the oral cavity.
    Author Bio(s)

     

    Evan B. Rosen, DMD, MPH, is a maxillofacial prosthodontist and lecturer at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine. Dr. Rosen completed his master’s degree in public health at Florida International University, his doctor of dental medicine degree at the University of Florida College of Dentistry, and his prosthodontics residency at the Eastman Institute for Oral Health in Rochester, New York. Dr. Rosen continued his professional training by completing a fellowship in maxillofacial prosthetics at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. Dr. Rosen is actively engaged in research focusing on quality of life outcomes and the management of medically complex patients.

     

    Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

    Toni M. Roucka, RN, DDS, MA, is an associate professor of restorative dentistry at Southern Illinois University, School of Dental Medicine, Edwardsville. She maintains an active nursing license and is a Fellow of the American College of Dentists and immediate past president of the American Society for Dental Ethics. Dr. Roucka obtained her DDS degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry and master’s degree in population health – bioethics from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Roucka is a nationally recognized speaker on the subject of ethics in dentistry and has taught restorative dentistry at both Marquette University and the Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine. As a volunteer, she has provided dental care to underserved populations in Guatemala, Venezuela, the Dominican Republic, and Tanzania.

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