Disciplines: Dental Hygienist
Hours: 24 Contact Hours
Item#: LHTOH

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Item # LHTOH
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Prescription Drug Abuse Among Dental Patients: Scope, Prevention, and Management Considerations, Updated 1st Edition - 3 Hours

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0743  

Release Date: October 1, 2013

Review Date: June 7, 2016

Expiration Date: June 6, 2019

 

Abuse of prescription drugs has increased so dramatically in the United States that it has been labeled a national epidemic. For dental patients, pain is often an unavoidable sequela to invasive dental procedures and untreated or long-standing oral disease. Balancing the desire to alleviate pain against the suspicion that the patient may be a drug seeker is just one of the issues that confront dental providers. The patient’s past medical, dental, and social history; current history; chief complaint; and history of prescription drug use all contribute to the impression received by the dental provider. How the dental provider manages this information is critical to the result of the visit and subsequent outcome for the patient.

The purpose of this basic-level course is to provide dental providers with an appreciation of the scope of the problem of prescription drug abuse and a realization that the misuse and abuse of these drugs likely take place among the patient populations they serve. By becoming familiar with the pharmacology of the most commonly abused drugs, the risk factors for developing addictive behaviors, and the manner in which these medications are commonly acquired, dental providers will be positioned to curb prescribing practices that contribute to this growing problem and will be better able to serve their patients and their communities as informed prevention advocates. The information provided in this course is applicable to all dental team members, regardless of their practice setting or scope of practice. The information is of interest to dental team members in private practice, academic institutions, military service positions, hospitals, and community health centers.

 

AGD Subject Code: 157

Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

 

 

This course is an extract of, and should not be taken in conjunction with, L0852 - Prescription Drug Abuse Among Dental Patients: Scope, Prevention, and Management Considerations, Updated 1st Edition (2 contact hours).

 

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the history and scope of prescription drug abuse and the role of the dental professional.
  • Define the terminology used in discussing prescription drug abuse.
  • Explain the pharmacology, physiology, and regulatory control of the prescription drugs that are most commonly abused and the extent and impact of their nonmedical use.
  • Describe the populations most at risk for abusing prescription drugs and their access to these drugs.
  • Discuss the tactics and resources available to manage and prevent prescription drug abuse in the dental practice.
Author Bio(s)

Marnie Oakley, DMD, is the associate dean of clinical affairs at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine, from which she received her DMD in 1992. Dr. Oakley served in both active duty and reserve roles as a dental officer in the United States Navy. As an experienced educator, she has taught numerous courses related to clinical dentistry, including Oral Diagnosis and Treatment Planning, Clinical Restorative Dentistry, and the Clinical Responsibility course series. In addition to being a published author and presenter on the subject of prescription drug abuse, Dr. Oakley was responsible for the development and implementation of the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine Comprehensive Care Program. Dr. Oakley also served as Chair of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Annual Session Planning Committee for two consecutive years, for which she received a Presidential Citation. She served in officer positions in several ADEA committees and groups. Dr. Oakley maintains membership in numerous professional organizations including the American Dental Association (ADA), Pennsylvania Dental Association (PDA), Western Pennsylvania Dental Association (WPDA), Omicron Kappa Upsilon, and the Academy of General Dentistry. 

Jean O’Donnell, DMD, MSN, is the associate dean for for academic affairs at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine, from which she received her DMD in 1990. Within the same institution, she is an associate professor in the department of Restorative Dentistry and Comprehensive Care. Dr. O’Donnell holds a bachelor’s degree in nursing from Pennsylvania State University and a master’s degree in nursing from the University of Pittsburgh. She is a graduate of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Leadership Institute and currently serves as one of the university’s liaisons to the ADEA Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education. She is a member of Omicron Kappa Upsilon. Prescription drug abuse and tobacco cessation are among Dr. O’Donnell’s special interests.

Michael A. Zemaitis, PhD, holds a bachelor’s degree in pharmacy and a PhD in pharmacology. He is a professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences in the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy, and he teaches in the professional and graduate programs in the School of Pharmacy and the School of Dental Medicine. Dr. Zemaitis’s current area of research interest is biochemical pharmacology, with a special interest in drug and metabolite analysis in biological fluids. He actively supports several pharmacy-related policy issues, including the establishment of a prescription drug monitoring program in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania designed to reduce drug diversion and abuse, and “Project Life Line,” a program to have community pharmacies provide the narcotic antidote naloxone to high-risk opiate users to prevent overdose deaths.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Wayne McElhiney, DPh, DDS, is a 1966 graduate of the University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy and a 1974 graduate of the University of Tennessee College of Dentistry. He maintained a private practice for 25 years and is currently director of the Wellness Committee of the Tennessee Dental Association. Dr. McElhiney is a member of NAADAC, the Association of Addiction Professionals, and he serves on the Advisory Council of the University of Utah School on Alcoholism and Other Drug Dependencies. In 2012-2013, he served as a consultant for the American Dental Association Counsel on Dental Practice. He serves as a consultant for the Drug Formulating and Pain Regimen for Alive Hospice in Nashville, Tennessee. Dr. McElhiney is a noted lecturer and published author and is currently involved in teaching the disease concept of addiction at the University of Tennessee College of Dentistry, the University of Tennessee College of Dental Hygiene, and Tennessee State University College of Dental Hygiene.

Periodontal Disease: Pathophysiology, Risk Factors, and Systemic Links, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0780  

Release Date: July 31, 2013

Review Date: September 9, 2016

Expiration Date: September 8, 2019

 

Periodontal disease is the primary cause of tooth loss in adults. Nearly half of all adults age 30 and older in the United States suffer from periodontal disease; the incidence of periodontal disease increases as people age, with approximately 70% of adults age 65 and older having the disease. The prevalence of periodontal disease varies among ethnic groups and between genders. Increased incidence of periodontal disease has been linked to poverty, lower levels of education, and smoking.

The symptoms of periodontal disease range from those that are nearly undetectable by the patient to those that are severe and alarming. All too often, periodontitis is a silent destroyer of oral health because pain is absent unless an acute infection occurs.

This basic-level course reviews the risk factors associated with periodontal disease, and discusses the potential links between periodontal disease and systemic conditions, such as diabetes, obesity, coronary heart disease, osteoporosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. The course describes the etiology and pathophysiology of periodontal disease, focusing on microbiology, viral causes, the autoimmune and inflammatory response, resident and infiltrating cells of the periodontium, and matrix metalloproteinases. The course prepares dental professionals to recognize periodontal disease and take steps to prevent this condition and to treat patients who already have or are at risk for developing periodontal disease.

 

 

 

AGD Subject Code: 490

 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the etiology and pathophysiology of periodontal disease.
  • Identify the risk factors for periodontal disease.
  • Describe the potential links between periodontal disease and systemic disease.
Author Bio(s)

 

John F. Kross, DMD, MSc, received his doctorate in dental medicine from Temple University School of Dentistry in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He completed a fellowship at Temple University Hospital in oral oncology and received a hospital appointment to the Department of Dentistry at the Medical Centers of Delaware (now the Christiana Health Care System). His professional training and experience include practicing general dentistry in Wilmington, Delaware, and in New London, Pennsylvania, as well as instructing students at Delaware Technical Community College in oral pathology. Dr. Kross has received numerous academic awards for his work in oral surgery, fixed partial prosthodontics, periodontics, and endodontics. He has been composing monographs, manuscripts, and continuing medical education courses since 1991.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Raymond K. Martin, DDS, MAGD, graduated in 1979 from Texas Tech University with a bachelor’s degree in microbiology and earned his DDS in 1983 from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. He then went on to study at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine in the General Practice Residency Program. Dr. Martin began his work in dental risk management after being awarded a Mastership in the Academy of General Dentistry. He consults with 20 legal firms as an expert witness and lectures extensively on dental risk management and ethics in dentistry. In addition, Dr. Martin teaches CAD/CAM dentistry as a CEREC mentor and has served as a Key Opinion Leader for an international dental implant manufacturer. Dr. Martin has maintained a private practice for more than three decades and is currently president of the Massachusetts Dental Society. He has served the American Dental Association on the Future of Dentistry work group and is currently a member of the Council on Government Affairs.

Infection Control, 2nd Edition

Price: $19.95 
Item # L0749  

Release Date: July 30, 2013

Review Date: June 17, 2016

Expiration Date: June 16, 2019

 

In the United States, an estimated 195,000 dentists, 200,000 registered dental hygienists, 300,000 dental assistants, and 35,000 dental laboratory technicians provide dental care to patients. During the provision of care, they are often occupationally exposed to infectious materials, including body substances, contaminated supplies, equipment, environmental surfaces, water, and air. Current recommendations by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are designed to prevent or reduce the potential for cross-transmission of pathogens from dental healthcare providers to patients, from patients to dental healthcare providers, and from patients to patients. Although the CDC guidelines focus mainly on outpatient, ambulatory dental healthcare settings, the recommended infection control practices are applicable to all settings in which dental treatment is provided.

This basic-level course explains proper use and handling of personal protective equipment and gives recommendations for appropriate gloving and hand hygiene. Instrument sterilization and disinfection, sterilization protocols, and the three categories of sterilizer monitoring are also reviewed. The CDC’s recommendations for managing environmental infection control are included. By understanding the concepts underlying infection control and by incorporating effective infection control protocols into their practice, dental healthcare providers will protect their patients and themselves.

 

AGD Subject Code: 148
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.
 

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe standard precautions and other procedures used to prevent infection in the clinical dental setting.
  • Explain the use of personal protective equipment, gloves, and appropriate hand hygiene.
  • Identify the categories of instrument sterilization and sterilization protocols used in the dental setting.
  • List the three categories of sterilizer monitoring.
  • Outline the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations for managing environmental infection control.
Author Bio(s)

 

Christine Wisnom, RN, BSN, is a nurse educator for the AIDS Education and Training Center in the Department of Oncology and Diagnostic Sciences at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry. Her primary areas of interest are infectious diseases and infection control, and she lectures locally, nationally, and internationally on these topics.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Toni M. Roucka, RN, DDS, MA, is an associate professor of restorative dentistry at Southern Illinois University, School of Dental Medicine, Edwardsville. She maintains an active nursing license and is a Fellow of the American College of Dentists and immediate past president of the American Society for Dental Ethics. Dr. Roucka obtained her DDS degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry and master’s degree in population health – bioethics from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Roucka is a nationally recognized speaker on the subject of ethics in dentistry and has taught restorative dentistry at both Marquette University and the Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine. As a volunteer, she has provided dental care to underserved populations in Guatemala, Venezuela, the Dominican Republic, and Tanzania.

Recurrent Aphthous Ulceration: Epidemiology, Differential Diagnosis, and Therapy

Price: $19.95 
Item # L0740  

Release Date: July 18, 2016

Expiration Date: July 17, 2019

 

Recurrent aphthous ulceration (RAU), also known as recurrent aphthous stomatitis and canker sores, is a common oral ulceration condition. RAU is widely considered to be a chronic inflammatory condition that affects approximately 20% of the population. These lesions tend to be episodic and may repeatedly arise over time in otherwise healthy individuals. RAU is a common lesion that presents to all clinical dentists. It is important for dentists to be knowledgeable concerning this pathologic condition in order to alleviate patients’ concerns and pain.

This basic-level course is intended to educate dentists and dental hygienists regarding RAU so that they are better equipped to effectively diagnose and treat their patients with this condition. It is important to provide clinicians with necessary information regarding diagnosis (including differential diagnosis) and treatment. The section on etiopathology discusses the immune-relate etiology of RAU as well as the gaps in our understanding of what causes RAU. The course addresses the epidemiology and general characteristics of RAU and differentiates the forms of the condition. Research on the link between celiac disease and RAU is presented and discussed. Finally, the course presents information on the varied treatment modalities for RAU.

 

 

AGD Subject Code: 734

 
Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Outline the epidemiology of oral recurrent aphthous ulceration (RAU).
  • Differentiate the three forms of RAU.
  • Describe the immune-related etiology for RAU.
  • Discuss differential diagnoses involving RAU.
  • Identify the treatments available for RAU.
Author Bio(s)

 

Ronald S. Brown, DDS, MS, Dipl ABOM, FAOM (HON), FACD, FICD, is a professor in the Department of Comprehensive Dentistry, Division of Oral Diagnosis, at Howard University College of Dentistry. Dr. Brown attended the University of Maryland and graduated from Georgetown University School of Dentistry in 1971. After serving in the United States Army Dental Corps, Dr. Brown began in private dental practice in Northern Virginia and the District of Columbia. In 1988, he completed postdoctoral education at Georgetown University with an MS in pharmacology and oral medicine. Dr. Brown has held faculty positions at Georgetown University School of Dentistry and the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. Currently, he is a professor of oral diagnosis at Howard University College of Dentistry (HUCD), a clinical associate professor of otolaryngology at Georgetown University Medical Center, and a volunteer clinical research associate at the Hematology Branch of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health. He is also the director of continuing dental education at HUCD. Dr. Brown’s areas of research include oral medicine, drug-induced gingival overgrowth, clinical trials, and oral inflammatory diseases (chronic oral graft-versus-host disease). He is a reviewer for JADA; General Dentistry; Oral Diseases; Journal of Dental Education; Postgraduate Medicine; and Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontics. He is on the editorial board of Dentistry Today and Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dentistry. He has more than 100 published peer-reviewed journal articles and more than a dozen combined published books and book chapters and has lectured and presented widely, both nationally and internationally. His mentors include Dr. William K. Bottomley, Dr. William T. Beaver, Dr. Sol Silverman, Jr., and Dr. Samuel Dreizen. For the past several years, Dr. Brown has been continuously listed as one of the top 100 CDE providers by Dentistry Today. He is a Diplomate of the American Board of Oral Medicine (ABOM), past-president of the ABOM, and a past-president of the American Academy of Oral Medicine. 

LaToya Barham, DDS, is an assistant professor and predoctoral program clinical coordinator in the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at Howard University College of Dentistry (HUCD). Dr. Barham earned a bachelor of science degree in biology from Clark Atlanta University in 2000 and a DDS from HUCD in 2004. She went on to earn a certificate in pediatric dentistry from HUCD in 2006. Dr. Barham is the creator and director of H.O.P.E. Yes!, a 3-week summer enrichment program that exposes underrepresented minority elementary, middle, and high school students to careers in dentistry and allied health sciences. In addition to her academic appointment, Dr. Barham maintains private practices in Northern Virginia and the District of Columbia.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Raymond K. Martin, DDS, MAGD, graduated in 1979 from Texas Tech University with a bachelor’s degree in microbiology and earned his DDS in 1983 from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. He then went on to study at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine in the General Practice Residency Program. Dr. Martin began his work in dental risk management after being awarded a Mastership in the Academy of General Dentistry. He consults with 20 legal firms as an expert witness and lectures extensively on dental risk management and ethics in dentistry. In addition, Dr. Martin teaches CAD/CAM dentistry as a CEREC mentor and has served as a Key Opinion Leader for an international dental implant manufacturer. Dr. Martin has maintained a private practice for more than three decades and is currently president of the Massachusetts Dental Society. He has served the American Dental Association on the Future of Dentistry work group and is currently a member of the Council on Government Affairs.

Fluoride Use in Modern Dental Practice: Action, Effect, and Delivery, 2nd Edition

Price: $19.95 
Item # L0761  

Release Date: July 30, 2013

Review Date: July 20, 2016

Expiration Date: July 19, 2019

 

Dental caries is a chronic, infectious and transmissible disease of multi-factorial origin. It is the single most common chronic disease in children worldwide, including the United States. Dental sealants, nutritional counseling, antimicrobial agents, oral hygiene instruction, early diagnostic measures, and fluorides can be used to manage this disease within a framework of early risk assessment and diagnostic procedures. Fluoride holds a special place in this paradigm because of its documented effectiveness in controlling and reducing dental caries.

This basic-level course discusses the pre-eruptive and post-eruptive mechanisms of fluoride action as well as the sources of fluoride and recommended intake levels. The course examines the latest research on the efficacy, cost-effectiveness, and safety of community water fluoridation in the United States. The processes of demineralization and remineralization are explained along with the risks of fluoridation and the recommended use of fluoride in high-caries-risk patients.

 

AGD Subject Code: 017

 
Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the mechanisms of action of fluoride.
  • Describe the efficacy, cost-effectiveness, and safety of community water fluoridation.
  • Discuss sources of fluoride and recommended intake levels.
  • Identify the risks of fluoridation.
  • State the recommended use of fluoride in high-caries-risk patients.
Author Bio(s)

 

Harold S. Goodman, DDS, MPH, received his bachelor of arts degree from Rutgers University and his dental degree from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. He obtained a master’s degree in public health from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health (now the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health) and completed a Dental Public Health residency program at the University of Michigan. In addition to maintaining a private practice, Dr. Goodman was an associate professor in the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry and director of the Office of Oral Health in the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene for the state of Maryland. Dr. Goodman has written many scientific articles, and in 2015 he received the Myron Allukian, Jr., Lifetime Achievement Award for Outstanding Contributions in Community Dental Programs.

Louis G. DePaola, DDS, MS, is a professor and the assistant dean of clinical affairs in the Department of Oncology and Diagnostic Sciences at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry in Baltimore, Maryland. He received his DDS in 1975 and a master of science degree in oral biology in 1981, both from the University of Maryland. He is a diplomate of the American Board of Oral Medicine and the American College of Dentists, and holds a certificate in prosthodontics. He is the director for dental training for the Pennsylvania/MidAtlantic AIDS Education and Training Center and served as a member of the American Dental Association (ADA) Council on Scientific Affairs from 2002 to 2005. Dr. DePaola has presented at the national meetings of most major dental associations and at numerous international conferences. He has authored or coauthored more than 130 journal articles, book chapters, and abstracts. He serves as a consultant to the ADA, other professional groups, and private industry. Over the past 20 years, Dr. DePaola has been awarded more than 75 research and service grants, many in the field of antiplaque chemotherapeutic agents, HIV/AIDS, management of medically compromised dental patients, rapid salivary diagnostic testing, dental unit waterlines, and infection control. In November of 2015, Dr. DePaola was appointed to the Maryland Board of Dental Examiners.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

Oral Soft Tissue Lesions: Diagnosis and Treatment, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0771  

Release Date: July 31, 2013

Review Date: August 4, 2016

Expiration Date: August 3, 2019

 

The oral cavity is an ideal place for microorganisms to grow. Many distinct bacterial groups live in the oral cavity, and some of these bacteria are considered to be part of the normal oral flora. Unfortunately, some of these common bacterial species can also be the cause of opportunistic infections (infections by species that are avirulent in healthy individuals but that can be fatal in patients with compromised immunity. It is important to be aware of the causes of common lesions found in the oral cavity so they can be properly diagnosed and treated.

This basic-level course reviews the soft tissue lesions found in the oral cavity of adults and discusses their diagnosis and treatment. Common problems include inflammatory and infectious processes, degenerative processes, and abnormal growths.

 

 

AGD Subject Code: 739
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • List the normal structures in the oral cavity identified during intra- and extraoral assessments.
  • Explain the inflammation process in the oral mucosa in relation to soft tissue lesions.
  • Describe the etiology of neoplasms and premalignant conditions in the oral cavity.
Author Bio(s)

 

Evan B. Rosen, DMD, MPH, is a maxillofacial prosthodontist and lecturer at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine. Dr. Rosen completed his master’s degree in public health at Florida International University, his doctor of dental medicine degree at the University of Florida College of Dentistry, and his prosthodontics residency at the Eastman Institute for Oral Health in Rochester, New York. Dr. Rosen continued his professional training by completing a fellowship in maxillofacial prosthetics at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. Dr. Rosen is actively engaged in research focusing on quality of life outcomes and the management of medically complex patients.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Toni M. Roucka, RN, DDS, MA, is an associate professor of restorative dentistry at Southern Illinois University, School of Dental Medicine, Edwardsville. She maintains an active nursing license and is a Fellow of the American College of Dentists and immediate past president of the American Society for Dental Ethics. Dr. Roucka obtained her DDS degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry and master’s degree in population health – bioethics from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Roucka is a nationally recognized speaker on the subject of ethics in dentistry and has taught restorative dentistry at both Marquette University and the Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine. As a volunteer, she has provided dental care to underserved populations in Guatemala, Venezuela, the Dominican Republic, and Tanzania.

Dental Sealants: Clinical Considerations for Selection and Placement

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0777  

Release Date: August 23, 2016

Expiration Date: August 22, 2019

 

Sealants are seen as a major preventive intervention because of the high prevalence of pit and fissure caries. The teeth most at risk are the newly erupted first molars, because the enamel is in its formative stage of maturation. The ADA and AAPD recognize that, when applied properly, sealants can play an important role in the prevention of tooth decay.

This basic-level course reviews the latest research and recommendations regarding the use of dental sealants. The course discusses the epidemiology of caries disease and the materials currently used in dental sealants. Research findings on the effectiveness of sealants are presented, as well as the clinical considerations that must factor into any practitioner’s decision to use dental sealants. Techniques for actual placement of dental sealants are outlined along with information on post-placement evaluation and follow-up care. Finally, safety concerns, including systemic toxicity, are discussed.

 

 

AGD Subject Code: 257

 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Discuss the epidemiology of dental caries.
  • Identify the materials used for dental sealants.
  • Explain the effectiveness of dental sealants.
  • List the clinical considerations for dental sealants.
  • Discuss placement techniques for dental sealants.
  • Explain the safety of dental sealants.
Author Bio(s)

 

Elena Francisco, RDH, RDHAP, MSDH, received her bachelor of science degree in dental hygiene from Loma Linda University and her master’s degree in dental hygiene education from Idaho State University. She is currently an adjunct clinical instructor in dental hygiene at Carrington College in Sacramento, California. Prior to joining the faculty at Carrington College, Ms. Francisco was a clinical instructor in dental hygiene at the University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry, where she served as a CAMBRA resource for dental hygiene students. A licensed registered dental hygienist and registered dental hygienist in alternative practice, Ms. Francisco has practiced dental hygiene in California for more than 40 years. She has coauthored several journal articles on dental hygienists’ knowledge, attitudes, and practice behaviors regarding caries risk assessment and management. Ms. Francisco has been a member of the statewide Task Force on Oral Health for People with Special Needs, cofounding member of the Oral Health Awareness Society, and member of a local task force whose goal is to reduce early childhood caries. She volunteers dental hygiene services to the dentally underserved in California.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Toni M. Roucka, RN, DDS, MA, is an associate professor of restorative dentistry at Southern Illinois University, School of Dental Medicine, Edwardsville. She maintains an active nursing license and is a Fellow of the American College of Dentists and immediate past president of the American Society for Dental Ethics. Dr. Roucka obtained her DDS degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry and master’s degree in population health – bioethics from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Roucka is a nationally recognized speaker on the subject of ethics in dentistry and has taught restorative dentistry at both Marquette University and the Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine. As a volunteer, she has provided dental care to underserved populations in Guatemala, Venezuela, the Dominican Republic, and Tanzania.

Herbal-Drug Interactions Important in Dentistry

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0790  

Release Date: November 2, 2016

Expiration Date: November 1, 2019

 

In the United States and Europe, over-the-counter natural herb products constitute a rapidly growing market, having joined prescription and over-the-counter medicines that were originally derived from herbs. Interest in herbal medicine has been facilitated by multiple factors, including the perception that pharmaceutical medications are expensive, overprescribed, and often dangerous. Alternatively, herbal medicines are often perceived as being “natural,” and therefore safe.

Herbal medicines now fall into the category of complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs). With the increasing popularity of CAMs, a new issue has arisen: herbal-drug interactions. Oral healthcare professionals must be aware not only of these products’ effects and advantageous synergies, but also of their side effects and possible or probable adverse drug reactions.

This basic-level course describes the prevalence and risk for interactions involving herbal medicines and lists the herbal medications and drugs of greatest concern to dental professionals. A stoplight approach to risk assessment is discussed and a general strategy to avoid the most common herbal-drug interactions is suggested. Critical patient populations (including women who are pregnant or breast feeding) are emphasized and specific herbal-drug interactions that can lead to increased bleeding, decreased blood glucose levels, and sedation changes are discussed. 

 

 

 

AGD Subject Code: 016

 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the prevalence and risk for interactions involving herbal medications.
  • List the herbal medications and drugs of greatest concern to dental professionals.
  • Describe the ways in which levels of risk for herbal-drug interactions are evaluated.
  • Identify the medical and dental implications for drug interactions with specific herbal medications.
  • Discuss the special considerations of herbal-drug interactions for pregnant or breastfeeding dental patients.
Author Bio(s)

 

Mark Donaldson, BSP, RPh, PharmD, ACPR, FASHP, FACHE, received his baccalaureate degree from the University of British Columbia and his doctorate in clinical pharmacy from the University of Washington. He has further completed a residency at Canada’s largest tertiary care facility, Vancouver General Hospital, and is the senior executive director of Pharmacy Clinical Services at Vizient. Dr. Donaldson is a clinical professor in the Department of Pharmacy at the University of Montana in Missoula and clinical associate professor in the School of Dentistry at the Oregon Health & Science University in Portland. He has a special interest in dental pharmacology and has lectured internationally to both dental and medical practitioners. Dr. Donaldson has a number of published works in the peer-reviewed literature and has co-authored textbook chapters. He spent three years in Japan focusing on cross-cultural communication and internationalization. He currently serves on the Editorial Board for The Journal of the American Dental Association (JADA), is board-certified in healthcare management, and is the past-president of the American College of Healthcare Executives’ Montana Chapter. In 2016 he was recognized by the Academy of General Dentistry as the recipient of the Dr. Thaddeus V. Weclew Award. This award is conferred upon an individual who has made outstanding contributions to the art and science of dentistry and/or enhanced the principles and ideals of the Academy.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Toni M. Roucka, RN, DDS, MA, is an associate professor of restorative dentistry at Southern Illinois University, School of Dental Medicine, Edwardsville. She maintains an active nursing license and is a Fellow of the American College of Dentists and immediate past president of the American Society for Dental Ethics. Dr. Roucka obtained her DDS degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry and master’s degree in population health – bioethics from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Roucka is a nationally recognized speaker on the subject of ethics in dentistry and has taught restorative dentistry at both Marquette University and the Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine. As a volunteer, she has provided dental care to underserved populations in Guatemala, Venezuela, the Dominican Republic, and Tanzania.

Management of Medical Emergencies: An Update, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0792  

Release Date: November 2, 2013

Review Date: November 25, 2016

Expiration Date: November 24, 2019

 

The 21st century will be characterized by major shifts in the age and health of the U.S. population. Approximately 14.5% of the U.S. population is age 65 or older and this percentage is increasing. More than one third of this population reports some type of disability or disease, including Type 2 diabetes mellitus which is associated with accelerated macrovascular and microvascular diseases and a much greater risk of myocardial infarction or stroke.

In addition to the increased risks associated with the elderly population, we are also seeing a significant increase in the incidence of asthma and atopic disease, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and the incidence of obesity in children and young adults.

As a result of these changes in the age and health of the U.S. population, emergent events are likely to increase in the dental office. It is essential that dental professionals be prepared to manage medical emergencies effectively and efficiently.

This basic-level course details the three major components of managing medical emergencies in the dental office: prevention, recognition, and treatment. Appropriate for all dental professionals, the course discusses the importance of obtaining a thorough medical history of each patient as well as the need to be able to recognize the signs and symptoms of life-threatening emergencies. The symptoms and treatment for patients with inadequate blood flow to the brain, inadequate delivery of oxygen to the brain, hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, and allergic reactions are described.

 

 

Fulfills the medical emergencies requirement in the following states: CT (DDS), MN (DDS, RDH, RDA), OR (DDS & RDH), and VT (DDS, RDH, RDA).

 

AGD Subject Code: 142

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Explain the importance of taking a thorough medical history in preventing a medical emergency.
  • Recognize the signs and symptoms of a potential life-threatening emergency.
  • Describe the symptoms and treatment necessary for the patient with impaired blood flow and/or oxygenation to the brain.
  • Describe the symptoms and treatment necessary for the patient with hypoglycemia/hyperglycemia.
  • Describe the symptoms and treatment necessary for the patient with hypothyroidism/hyperthyroidism.
  • Describe the symptoms and treatment necessary for the patient suffering from an allergic reaction.
Author Bio(s)

 

Stewart Bergman, DDS, MS, received his DDS degree from the State University of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn (SUNY Downstate). An oral and maxillofacial surgeon, he maintained a private practice for more than 40 years in Baltimore, Maryland. Dr. Bergman was formerly a professor and vice chair of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Hana K. Sadi, BDS, DMD, MSc, is an assistant professor in the Public Health and Community Service Department at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine. She also serves as the associate General Practice Residency (GPR) program director. Dr. Sadi received her bachelor of dental surgery degree from the University of Jordan – Faculty of Dentistry in 2004. She completed a 2-year GPR residency from 2005 to 2007 and a 1-year fellowship in general dentistry in 2008, both at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine. In 2012, Dr. Sadi received a master’s degree in dental research and a DMD from the Tufts University School of Dental Medicine. Dr. Sadi has researched medical emergencies in the dental setting and coauthored an article on the subject that was published in two journals in 2015 and 2016.

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