Disciplines: Dentists
Hours: 20 Contact Hours
Item#: LDSNJ

 

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New Jersey 20-Hour Dentist Bundle


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Item # LDSNJ
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HPV and Oral Cancer: Exploring the Link

Price: $49.95 
Item # L0731  

Release Date: May 16, 2016

Expiration Date: May 15, 2019

 

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States; an estimated 79 million Americans are currently infected with HPV and each year approximately 14 million people are newly infected. There is a growing body of research demonstrating the increasing incidence of HPV-related cancer in the oropharynx, which includes the tonsillar area and base of the tongue. As is the case with other cancers, early detection and timely treatment of HPV-related oral cancers can reduce the number of deaths from this disease.

Dental professionals are well positioned to play a role in the education, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of HPV-related oral cancer. Regular dental checkups that include a comprehensive head and neck examination can be beneficial in the early identification of precancerous and cancerous lesions. Dental patients may have questions about their risk of infection, their risk of developing cancer, and the protective value of available HPV vaccines. The established relationship between HPV and oral cancer will require dental providers to expand traditional patient education topics (i.e., tobacco and alcohol) to include information on HPV and develop communication skills appropriate for responding to patient inquiries and concerns as part of a comprehensive approach to preventive oral health care.

This intermediate-level course provides dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants with general information about HPV, evidence of the association between oral HPV and oral cancer, and effective ways to further communicate this information to patients. This course provides dental professionals with information that will enable them to effectively meet the challenges they face as the link between HPV and oral health continues to emerge.

 

AGD Subject Code: 750
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 5 continuing education credits.

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the human papillomavirus (HPV), including its prevalence, risk factors, symptoms, and links to cancer.
  • Describe oral HPV, including its prevalence, risk factors, symptoms, modes of transmission, and detection.
  • Discuss the prevalence, manifestations, and diagnosis of HPV-related oral cancer.
  • Explain the economic impact of HPV.
  • Identify the key tools for preventing the transmission of HPV.
  • Describe the dentist’s role in discussing HPV with patients.
Author Bio(s)

 

Virginia J. Dodd, PhD, MPH, RDH, received an associate of science degree in dental hygiene from St. Petersburg College in 1990 and an MPH in 1994 and PhD in 2000 in public health from the University of South Florida (USF). In 2001, Dr. Dodd became acting program director for the Florida Prevention Research
Center at USF and research assistant professor in the Department of Community and Family Health within the College of Public Health at USF. She subsequently joined the faculty at the University of Florida (UF) in Gainesville, initially as assistant professor and subsequently as associate professor in the Department of Health Education and Behavior, before becoming an associate professor in the Department of Community Dentistry and Behavioral Science of the College of Dentistry at UF in 2011. Dr. Dodd has taught in the areas of human sexuality, health education theory, social marketing, and psychosocial issues across the lifespan. She has written and lectured extensively on HPV prevalence among female university students, oral cancer prevention knowledge and behaviors in community samples of adults, and oral cancer screening and patient education practices among dentists and dental hygienists, including their readiness to provide HPV information to patients.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

John Basile, DDS, DMSc, received his DDS degree from the State University of New York at Stony Brook and completed a one-year dental residency at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Washington, DC. After practicing dentistry for three years, he began his oral pathology training at Harvard University Dental School and research training in a papillomavirus laboratory at Harvard Medical School, becoming a Fellow of the American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology and graduating with a degree in oral biology in 2002. Dr. Basile was a post-doctoral Research Fellow at the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, in Bethesda, Maryland, before taking his current position as an assistant professor at the University of Maryland Dental School in the Department of Oncology and Diagnostic Sciences. He is also a member of the Molecular and Structural Biology branch of the Marlene and Stuart Greenebaum Cancer Center at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Dr. Basile has been a board-certified oral and maxillofacial pathologist since 2008.

Dental Erosion: Causes and Preventative Practices, 2nd Edition

Price: $19.95 
Item # L0781  

Release Date: July 30, 2013

Review Date: September 19, 2016

Expiration Date: September 18, 2019

Dental erosion is a progressive loss of dental hard tissue caused by chemical processes without involvement of bacteria. This enamel dissolution is an irreversible process not directly associated with mechanical or traumatic factors, which distinguishes it from other types of wear, such as attrition (loss of tooth structure due to clenching or grinding), abrasion (mechanical loss of tooth structure caused by a foreign element), or abfraction (loss of tooth structure at the gumline due to occlusal forces). The clinical features of dental erosion appear as well-defined, wedge-shaped areas facially and cervically. The occurrence of enamel erosion lesions is associated primarily with intrinsic and extrinsic acids.

The rise in consumption of soft drinks, including sports drinks, has been linked to increases in the rates of dental erosion. The additives to these drinks, not the beverage pH per se, appear to be the causative factors contributing to enamel dissolution. Furthermore, fruit-flavored drinks and unsweetened juices appear to have the same erosive potential as carbonated drinks.

This basic-level course provides dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants with guidelines for recognizing and diagnosing dental erosion and offers suggestions for preventive interventions, including record-keeping, nutritional counseling, fluoride use, and home-care procedures. The course also discusses recommended restorative treatment options.

 

 

AGD Subject Code: 741

 
Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Recognize dental erosion and its causes.
  • Describe preventive interventions and restorative treatment options.
Author Bio(s)

 

Marion C. Manski, RDH, MS, has practiced clinical dental hygiene for more than 30 years. She is a graduate of the Forsyth School for Dental Hygienists, the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, and most recently the University of Maryland, Baltimore, where she earned her master’s degree. Ms. Manski is an associate professor in and the director of the Dental Hygiene Program, University of Maryland School of Dentistry. She provides clinical and didactic instruction to junior and senior dental hygiene students. Ms. Manski is also in private practice. Her research interests include nutrition, dental caries, and caries prevention.

J. Anthony von Fraunhofer, MSc, PhD, FADM, FRSC, is professor emeritus, University of Maryland Dental School, Baltimore, Maryland, where he also served as director of biomaterials research in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. He has written more than 400 scientific papers and 16 books, and contributed chapters to 15 monographs on dental biomaterials and materials science. Dr. von Fraunhofer is the author of the well-regarded monographs Dental Materials at a Glance and Research Writing in Dentistry, published by Wiley-Blackwell. His special interests are the biomechanical properties of materials used in medicine and dentistry, and the degradation, wear, and corrosion of materials in the biosystem.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

Simplifying Endodontics for Greater Predictability and Ease of Treatment

Price: $19.95 
Item # L0784  

Release Date: September 21, 2016

Expiration Date: September 20, 2019

 

Advances in the endodontic arena have elevated the quality of endodontic treatment that can be provided and have improved the long-term prognosis for the teeth treated. Rotary instrumentation, when introduced in the 1990s, enabled the standardization of canal preparations. Newly developed reciprocating files have improved upon traditional rotary files with respect to increased cyclic fatigue resistance and reduction in fracture. More recently, adhesive dentistry has moved into the endodontic realm with obturation materials that resist leakage. Bioceramic materials show promise in improving root canal sealing and reducing bacterial microleakage. Primary root canal therapy can expect a success rate of between 75.6% and 92.5%, depending on the preoperative status of the pulp. The desire for 100% successful endodontics has led to the development of new materials and methods. Each product is designed to help reduce treatment complications and improve outcomes.

This basic-level course discusses the importance of proper isolation and appropriate pre-access buildups. Proper access for endodontic treatment is also explained. The course describes effective strategies for cleaning and shaping the root canal system, followed by an outlining of the principles of obturation. The importance of the coronal restoration and access sealing for successful endodontic treatment is explained. Finally, the course brings all of these elements together in a case scenario, which, though it cannot cover all contingencies, can help the general dentist, as well as dental hygienists and dental assistants, to understand the basics of root canal therapy and the strategies involved in improving endodontic outcomes.  

 

 

AGD Subject Code: 070
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Discuss the importance of proper isolation and appropriate pre-access buildups.
  • Explain proper access for endodontic treatment.
  • Discuss effective strategies for cleaning and shaping the root canal system.
  • Summarize the principles of obturation.
  • Explain the importance of the coronal restoration and access sealing.
Author Bio(s)

 

Brian C. Warner, DMD, received his bachelor of science degree with honors from the University of Michigan. He later graduated magna cum laude and received his doctorate of dental medicine from Tufts University School of Dental Medicine. At Tufts, Dr. Warner earned honors for high performance on the National Board Exams, merit scholarships for exceptional academic performance, and membership in the prestigious Omicron Kappa Upsilon dental honor society. After 3 years working in general practice, Dr. Warner returned to school to earn his specialty certificate in endodontics from New York University (NYU) College of Dentistry. While at NYU, his peers selected him to serve as chief resident. He is an active member of the American Association of Endodontics, the American Dental Association, the New York State Dental Association, and the New York County Dental Society. Dr. Warner is a Diplomate of the American Board of Endodontics.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Raymond K. Martin, DDS, MAGD, graduated in 1979 from Texas Tech University with a bachelor’s degree in microbiology and earned his DDS in 1983 from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. He then went on to study at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine in the General Practice Residency Program. Dr. Martin began his work in dental risk management after being awarded a Mastership in the Academy of General Dentistry. He consults with 20 legal firms as an expert witness and lectures extensively on dental risk management and ethics in dentistry. In addition, Dr. Martin teaches CAD/CAM dentistry as a CEREC mentor and has served as a Key Opinion Leader for an international dental implant manufacturer. Dr. Martin has maintained a private practice for more than three decades and is currently president of the Massachusetts Dental Society. He has served the American Dental Association on the Future of Dentistry work group and is currently a member of the Council on Government Affairs.

The Impact of Vascular and Cardiovascular Diseases on Oral Health, 2nd Edition

Price: $39.95 
Item # L0755  

Release Date: July 27, 2010

Review Date: July 8, 2016

Expiration Date: July 7, 2019

 

The oral presentation of microvascular diseases such as diabetes is well documented, but many common cardiovascular conditions, including ischemic heart disease, also present with oral manifestations. In addition, patients with specific vascular diseases, such as granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly called Wegener’s granulomatosis), may present with pathognomonic oral lesions. In some instances, oral involvement precedes the appearance of other symptoms or lesions at other locations. To aid in diagnosis and guide the approach to dental treatment, dental healthcare professionals should recognize oral manifestations of cardiovascular diseases and other systemic or multiorgan diseases with a vascular component. A thorough understanding of the potential oral side effects of therapeutic agents commonly used to treat cardiovascular diseases is very helpful in overall patient management.

This intermediate-level course addresses current concepts regarding the relationship between oral health and vascular and cardiovascular diseases, including the impact on oral health of common cardiovascular pharmacotherapies. This course is intended for dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants, as well as other healthcare professionals involved in the management of patients with selected vascular and cardiovascular diseases.

 

AGD Subject Code: 730
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 4 continuing education credits.

 

 

Disclosures

 

  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.

 

Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Discuss the prevalence and history of cardiovascular disease and its relationship with periodontal disease.
  • Describe the signs, symptoms, and oral manifestations of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes.
  • List oral presentations of cardiac agents used in treating cardiovascular disease.
  • Identify oral manifestations of congenital cardiovascular diseases and diseases with a vascular component.
  • Explain oral healthcare recommendations for patients with selected cardiovascular conditions.
Author Bio(s)

 

John F. Kross, DMD, MSc, received his doctorate in dental medicine from Temple University School of Dentistry in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He completed a fellowship at Temple University Hospital in oral oncology and received a hospital appointment to the Department of Dentistry at the Medical Centers of Delaware (now the Christiana Health Care System). His professional training and experience include practicing general dentistry in Wilmington, Delaware, and in New London, Pennsylvania, as well as instructing students at Delaware Technical Community College in oral pathology. Dr. Kross has received numerous academic awards for his work in oral surgery, fixed partial prosthodontics, periodontics, and endodontics. He has been composing monographs, manuscripts, and continuing medical education courses since 1991.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Paul Subar, DDS, EdD, FACD, is an assistant professor of dental practice and director of the Special Care Clinic and Hospital Dentistry at the University of the Pacific, Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry in San Francisco, California. Dr. Subar earned his bachelor’s degree in biochemistry and molecular biology at the University of California, Santa Cruz; his DDS at the University of California, Los Angeles; his advanced training in hospital dentistry at the University of California Los Angeles Medical Center; and his doctorate of education at the Benerd School of Education, University of the Pacific.

Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

Erosion-Related Tooth Wear: Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment, 2nd Edition

Price: $39.95 
Item # L0757  

Release Date: July 25, 2010

Review Date: July 11, 2016

Expiration Date: July 10, 2019

 

Tooth wear is defined as the loss of dental hard tissue by a chemical or mechanical process that does not involve bacteria. The mechanisms of tooth wear include erosion, attrition, abrasion, and abfraction. Dental erosion results from chemical processes and is an important cause of tooth tissue loss in both children and adults. The damage caused by erosion can be accelerated when it occurs in combination with attrition or abrasion.

Early recognition of tooth wear is essential to successful management and prevention of disease progression. The primary dental care team is in the ideal position to provide this care to patients with dental erosion and other forms of tooth wear. This intermediate-level course provides dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants with an overview of the etiology of tooth wear and explains the pathogenic processes involved in tooth erosion. It describes the necessary protocol for assessing erosion in patients and making a diagnosis. Preventive measures and treatment approaches are included.

 

AGD Subject Code: 741

 

 
Western Schools designates this activity for 4 continuing education credits.

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Explain the etiology of tooth wear and the pathogenic process of tooth erosion.
  • Describe the protocol in patient assessment and diagnosis of erosion.
  • Describe prevention and restorative treatment approaches for erosion-related tooth wear.
Author Bio(s)

 

John F. Kross, DMD, MSc, received his doctorate in dental medicine from Temple University School of Dentistry in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He completed a fellowship at Temple University Hospital in oral oncology and received a hospital appointment to the Department of Dentistry at the Medical Centers of Delaware (now the Christiana Health Care System). His professional training and experience include practicing general dentistry in Wilmington, Delaware, and in New London, Pennsylvania, as well as instructing students at Delaware Technical Community College in oral pathology. Dr. Kross has received numerous academic awards for his work in oral surgery, fixed partial prosthodontics, periodontics, and endodontics. He has been composing monographs, manuscripts, and continuing medical education courses since 1991.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

Nitrous Oxide–Oxygen Inhalational Sedation: Managing Pain and Anxiety

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0759  

Release Date: July 20, 2016

Expiration Date: July 19, 2019

 

This intermediate-level course reviews the history, pharmacology, and contemporary techniques of N2O/O2 sedation in the dental setting, discusses the continuum of consciousness and examines where N2O/O2 sedation may fit in the treatment paradigm. This course will also fill gaps in knowledge concerning patient selection, regulations, contraindications, and techniques for appropriate administration in certain special populations requiring advanced consideration. The principles learned will be directly applicable in determining the most suitable approach for the cardiac, pregnant, and breast-feeding patient, and will help to address staff concerns around potential environmental risks.   

Since the goal of any successful procedure is to ensure selection of the right drug at the right time and at the right dose, for the right patient and the right procedure, the information presented in this intermediate-level course should be considered essential knowledge for all oral healthcare practitioners.

 

AGD Subject Code: 132

 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.
 
New Jersey (RDH & RDA) – Fulfills nitrous oxide requirement.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the history, pharmacology, and physical properties of nitrous oxide–oxygen inhalational sedation.
  • Explain the effects of nitrous oxide–oxygen on physiological systems.
  • Outline the administration of nitrous oxide–oxygen inhalational sedation in the dental office.
  • Discuss the complications of nitrous oxide–oxygen inhalational sedation.
Author Bio(s)

 

Mark Donaldson, BSP, RPH, PharmD, ACPR, FASHP, FACHE, received his baccalaureate degree from the University of British Columbia and his doctorate in clinical pharmacy from the University of Washington. He has further completed a residency at Canada’s largest tertiary care facility, Vancouver General Hospital, and is the current Director of Pharmacy Clinical Services at Vizient. Dr. Donaldson is a clinical professor in the Department of Pharmacy at the University of Montana in Missoula, and clinical associate professor in the School of Dentistry at the Oregon Health & Science University in Portland. He has a special interest in dental pharmacology and has lectured internationally to both dental and medical practitioners. Dr. Donaldson has a number of published works in the peer-reviewed literature and has co-authored textbook chapters. He spent three years in Japan focusing on cross-cultural communication and internationalization. He currently serves on the Editorial Board for The Journal of the American Dental Association (JADA), is board-certified in healthcare management, and is the pastpresident of the American College of Healthcare Executives’ Montana Chapter. In 2016 he was recognized by the Academy of General Dentistry as the recipient of the Dr. Thaddeus V. Weclew Award. This award is conferred upon an individual who has made outstanding contributions to the art and science of dentistry and/or enhanced the principles and ideals of the Academy.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Raymond K. Martin, DDS, MAGD, graduated in 1979 from Texas Tech University with a bachelor’s degree in microbiology and earned his DDS in 1983 from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. He then went on to study at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine in the General Practice Residency Program. Dr. Martin began his work in dental risk management after being awarded a Mastership in the Academy of General Dentistry. He consults with 20 legal firms as an expert witness and lectures extensively on dental risk management and ethics in dentistry. In addition, Dr. Martin teaches CAD/CAM dentistry as a CEREC mentor and has served as a Key Opinion Leader for an international dental implant manufacturer. Dr. Martin has maintained a private practice for more than three decades and is currently president of the Massachusetts Dental Society. He has served the American Dental Association on the Future of Dentistry work group and is currently a member of the Council on Government Affairs.

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