Disciplines: Dental Assisting
Hours: 16 Contact Hours
Item#: LATMO

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Missouri 16-Hour Dental Assistant Bundle


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Just $111.95
Item # LATMO
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When available, the Online Course format is included with the hard copy, eBook, or audio book formats!

This product includes the following courses:
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Infection Control: A Review and Update, 2nd Edition

Price: $19.95 Hours:2 Contact Hours
Item # L0735  

Release Date:  July 30, 2013

Review Date: May 16, 2016

Expiration Date: May 15, 2019

In the course of the provision of dental care, patients and dental healthcare personnel can be exposed to pathogens through contact with blood, oral and respiratory secretions, and contaminated equipment. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) strives to provide recommendations for infection control in the dental office that are clear, practical, and evidence based. Most of today’s practicing dentists work in a private practice setting, in which patients are seen in an outpatient ambulatory care facility. Without the benefit of working with an infection control specialist, it becomes the dentist’s responsibility to monitor and recommend safe practices.

For the purpose of education, training should be provided to all new employees. Training should also be included with any new procedures that are introduced that may pose a risk. It is important to remember in designing a training program that material and content should be appropriate to the duties of the employee and taught at a level of understanding for every individual involved.

This basic-level course provides an overview of standard precautions and routine practice for infection control in a dental practice. The concept of the "chain of infection" is explained along with the use of personal protective equipment such as gloves, masks, and eyewear. Proper instrument sterilization techniques are outlined.

AGD Subject Code: 148
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

Managing the Adult Dental Phobic Patient, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 Hours:3 Contact Hours
Item # L0737  

Release Date:  July 31, 2013

Review Date: May 16, 2016

Expiration Date: May 15, 2019

Dental phobia may be a universal barrier to seeking oral health care. Dental phobics are not comfortable seeking regular dental care, even when dental problems arise. The dental team needs to be aware of the concerns of this population in order to reduce fear and anxiety and provide needed oral health care.

This basic-level course distinguishes between the definitions of fear, anxiety, and phobia. It identifies the most common reactions that accompany phobias and common reasons for avoidance of dental treatment. The course describes the behavioral treatment options for anxious dental patients and techniques for reducing general anxiety in dental patients. This course will provide dental professionals with basic knowledge and information on dental fear and avoidance that will enable them to diagnose and manage patients who experience dental-related anxiety, fear, and phobia. This knowledge will help dental professionals prepare for these patients and their unique needs and help these patients feel more comfortable seeking their care in the future.

AGD Subject Code: 153; California Course #03-4640-16-737

Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

Malodor: Detection and Treatment, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 Hours:3 Contact Hours
Item # L0739  

Release Date: July 31, 2013

Review Date: May 18, 2016

Expiration Date: May 17, 2019

Chronic oral malodor, also referred to as halitosis, bad breath, mouth malodor, oral malodor, and fetor oris, is an unpleasant condition that is estimated to affect up to 50% of the population. This common condition is often distressing for patients, causing them social embarrassment and affecting their relationships and self-esteem. Given its prevalence and psychosocial effects, it is no surprise that malodor is one of the chief complaints reported to dental health providers. Effective management depends on identifying the origin of the malodor and instituting the appropriate treatment.

Appropriate for all dental professionals, this basic-level course describes the nature and prevalence of halitosis, reviews the steps for assessing a patient with halitosis, discusses the oral, nonoral, and systemic origins of halitosis, differential diagnosis, and treatment planning. The course also discusses the relationship between oral malodor and oral disease, including gingivitis and periodontitis. Case scenarios highlight the concepts presented and reinforce learning.

AGD Subject Code: 739
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

Tooth Polishing, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 Hours:3 Contact Hours
Item # L0736  

Release Date: July 30, 2013

Review Date: May 20, 2016

Expiration Date: May 19, 2019

The focus of dental hygiene services is the oral prophylaxis. This involves scaling – the removal of supragingival and subgingival calculus – and coronal polishing. As defined by the American Academy of Periodontology, oral prophylaxis is the “removal of plaque, calculus and stains from the exposed and unexposed surfaces of the teeth by scaling and polishing as a preventive measure for the control of local irritational factors.”

Appropriate for all members of the dental team, this basic-level course describes the most recent research on tooth polishing, including its effects on tooth structure and enamel and discusses traditional rubber-cup polishing as well as contraindications to the use of oral prophylaxis pastes.  The course presents the evolution of air polishing, its effects on gingiva, hard tooth structures, and dental restorations, as well as its indications and contraindications. Criteria for patient selection, preparation for air polishing, and air polishing techniques are outlined as well as steps for air polishing unit cleanup. Case scenarios highlight the concepts presented and reinforce learning.

AGD Subject Code: 250

Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

Update of Concepts in Vital Tooth Whitening, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 Hours:3 Contact Hours
Item # L0727  

Release Date: December 3, 2010

Review Date: June 2, 2016

Expiration Date: June 1, 2019

Vital tooth whitening is an aesthetic and conservative treatment for discolored teeth. The popularity of vital tooth whitening has increased dramatically in recent years, as shown by the increased number of products and procedures introduced, ranging from at-home tray whitening and trayless whitening techniques – both dentist prescribed and over the counter (OTC) – to in-office 1-hour whitening systems. Recent years have also seen the rise of nondental options for vital tooth whitening. The increasing number of vital tooth-whitening techniques and materials has created a clinical challenge for dentists and other oral health providers seeking to balance effectiveness and safety. Proper patient selection for vital tooth whitening becomes even more important in this environment.

Most recently, there has been a push to find ways to accelerate and improve the delivery of the whitening process. These include a number of light sources believed to accelerate the breakdown of peroxide and thus speed up the whitening process. Research in this area is controversial, with the literature describing different conclusions about the benefits of light-activated whitening. The popularity of strip-based peroxide delivery represents a departure from the conventional use of a professionally supervised tray system and raises questions about safety and efficacy.

Patient demand for tooth whitening remains high, and oral health providers have more options for treatment, so it is important that clinicians evaluate which of these options is best for their patients. This basic-level course reviews concepts in vital tooth whitening, including recommendations in ADA guidelines; describes evolving issues in vital tooth whitening (e.g., measurement of color change, the color rebound effect, and safety issues); and explains the risk and benefits of established and new technologies.

AGD Subject Code: 781
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

Fluoride Use in Modern Dental Practice: Action, Effect, and Delivery, 2nd Edition

Price: $19.95 Hours:2 Contact Hours
Item # L0761  

Release Date: July 30, 2013

Review Date: July 20, 2016

Expiration Date: July 19, 2019

Dental caries is a chronic, infectious and transmissible disease of multi-factorial origin. It is the single most common chronic disease in children worldwide, including the United States. Dental sealants, nutritional counseling, antimicrobial agents, oral hygiene instruction, early diagnostic measures, and fluorides can be used to manage this disease within a framework of early risk assessment and diagnostic procedures. Fluoride holds a special place in this paradigm because of its documented effectiveness in controlling and reducing dental caries.

This basic-level course discusses the pre-eruptive and post-eruptive mechanisms of fluoride action as well as the sources of fluoride and recommended intake levels. The course examines the latest research on the efficacy, cost-effectiveness, and safety of community water fluoridation in the United States. The processes of demineralization and remineralization are explained along with the risks of fluoridation and the recommended use of fluoride in high-caries-risk patients.

 

AGD Subject Code: 017

 
Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

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