Disciplines: Dental Assisting
Hours: 16 Contact Hours
Item#: LATMO

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Missouri 16-Hour Dental Assistant Bundle


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Item # LATMO
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Update of Concepts in Vital Tooth Whitening, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0727  

Release Date: December 3, 2010

Review Date: June 2, 2016

Expiration Date: June 1, 2019

 

Vital tooth whitening is an aesthetic and conservative treatment for discolored teeth. The popularity of vital tooth whitening has increased dramatically in recent years, as shown by the increased number of products and procedures introduced, ranging from at-home tray whitening and trayless whitening techniques – both dentist prescribed and over the counter (OTC) – to in-office 1-hour whitening systems. Recent years have also seen the rise of nondental options for vital tooth whitening. The increasing number of vital tooth-whitening techniques and materials has created a clinical challenge for dentists and other oral health providers seeking to balance effectiveness and safety. Proper patient selection for vital tooth whitening becomes even more important in this environment.

Most recently, there has been a push to find ways to accelerate and improve the delivery of the whitening process. These include a number of light sources believed to accelerate the breakdown of peroxide and thus speed up the whitening process. Research in this area is controversial, with the literature describing different conclusions about the benefits of light-activated whitening. The popularity of strip-based peroxide delivery represents a departure from the conventional use of a professionally supervised tray system and raises questions about safety and efficacy.

Patient demand for tooth whitening remains high, and oral health providers have more options for treatment, so it is important that clinicians evaluate which of these options is best for their patients. This basic-level course reviews concepts in vital tooth whitening, including recommendations in ADA guidelines; describes evolving issues in vital tooth whitening (e.g., measurement of color change, the color rebound effect, and safety issues); and explains the risk and benefits of established and new technologies.

 

AGD Subject Code: 781
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe evolving issues in vital tooth whitening, including measuring color change.
  • Explain prewhitening evaluations and mechanisms underlying vital tooth whitening.
  • Outline current vital tooth-whitening methods and materials.
  • Identify the color rebound effect and safety issues associated with vital tooth whitening.
Author Bio(s)

 

John F. Kross, MSc, DMD, received his doctorate in dental medicine from Temple University School of Dentistry in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He completed a fellowship at Temple University Hospital in oral oncology and received a hospital appointment to the Department of Dentistry at the Medical Centers of Delaware (now the Christiana Health Care System). His professional training and experience include practicing general dentistry in Wilmington, Delaware, and in New London, Pennsylvania, as well as instructing students at Delaware Technical Community College in oral pathology. Dr. Kross has received numerous academic awards for his work in oral surgery, fixed partial prosthodontics, periodontics, and endodontics. He has been composing monographs, manuscripts, and continuing medical education courses since 1991.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Raymond K. Martin, DDS, MAGD, graduated in 1979 from Texas Tech University with a bachelor’s degree in microbiology and earned his DDS in 1983 from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. He then went on to study at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine in the General Practice Residency Program. Dr. Martin began his work in dental risk management after being awarded a Mastership in the Academy of General Dentistry. He consults with 20 legal firms as an expert witness and lectures extensively on dental risk management and ethics in dentistry. In addition, Dr. Martin teaches CAD/CAM dentistry as a CEREC mentor and has served as a Key Opinion Leader for an international dental implant manufacturer. Dr. Martin has maintained a private practice for more than three decades and is currently president of the Massachusetts Dental Society. He has served the American Dental Association on the Future of Dentistry work group and is currently a member of the Council on Government Affairs.

Managing the Adult Dental Phobic Patient, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0737  

Release Date:  July 31, 2013

Review Date: May 16, 2016

Expiration Date: May 15, 2019

 

Dental phobia may be a universal barrier to seeking oral health care. Dental phobics are not comfortable seeking regular dental care, even when dental problems arise. The dental team needs to be aware of the concerns of this population in order to reduce fear and anxiety and provide needed oral health care.

This basic-level course distinguishes between the definitions of fear, anxiety, and phobia. It identifies the most common reactions that accompany phobias and common reasons for avoidance of dental treatment. The course describes the behavioral treatment options for anxious dental patients and techniques for reducing general anxiety in dental patients. This course will provide dental professionals with basic knowledge and information on dental fear and avoidance that will enable them to diagnose and manage patients who experience dental-related anxiety, fear, and phobia. This knowledge will help dental professionals prepare for these patients and their unique needs and help these patients feel more comfortable seeking their care in the future.

AGD Subject Code: 153; California Course #03-4640-16-737

 

Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Define fear, anxiety, and phobia and their common behavioral manifestations.
  • Distinguish among the four types of anxiety.
  • Identify the techniques used to reduce anxiety in dental patients.
  • Describe the psychological and pharmacological treatment techniques used to manage dental fears, phobias, and anxiety.
  • Describe an effective local injection technique used for fearful or phobic dental patients.
Author Bio(s)

 

Ellen Dietz-Bourguignon, BS, CDA-Emeritus, earned her bachelor of science degree in allied health education in dental auxiliary utilization and a community college teaching certificate from the State University of New York at Buffalo. She began her dental career as an associate-degreed certified dental assistant in private practice. Following a 7-year dental assisting teaching career at Orange County Community College, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Erie County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, and Niagara County Community College, she began writing on dental topics for Dental Assisting Magazine, eventually rising to the position of managing editor. Ms. Dietz-Bourguignon has worked in dental marketing, project management, and product development at Semantodontics and in legal administration for the Arizona State Board of Dental Examiners. She has published five books in the dental assisting market, including Dental Office Management and Safety Standards and Infection Control for Dental Assistants, and has been keynote speaker at the American Dental Assistants Association Annual Session. Her articles have appeared in numerous journals, including The Dental Assistant, Dentist, The Dental Student, Dental Economics, RDH, and Dental Teamwork.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Toni M. Roucka, RN, DDS, MA, is an associate professor of restorative dentistry and associate dean for academic affairs at Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine in Alton, Illinois. She maintains an active nursing license and is a Fellow of the American College of Dentists and immediate president of the American Society for Dental Ethics. Dr. Roucka obtained her DDS degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry and master’s degree in population health – bioethics from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Roucka is a nationally recognized speaker on the subject of ethics in dentistry and has taught restorative dentistry at both Marquette University and Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine.

Tooth Polishing, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0736  

Release Date: July 30, 2013

Review Date: May 20, 2016

Expiration Date: May 19, 2019

 

The focus of dental hygiene services is the oral prophylaxis. This involves scaling – the removal of supragingival and subgingival calculus – and coronal polishing. As defined by the American Academy of Periodontology, oral prophylaxis is the “removal of plaque, calculus and stains from the exposed and unexposed surfaces of the teeth by scaling and polishing as a preventive measure for the control of local irritational factors.”

Appropriate for all members of the dental team, this basic-level course describes the most recent research on tooth polishing, including its effects on tooth structure and enamel and discusses traditional rubber-cup polishing as well as contraindications to the use of oral prophylaxis pastes.  The course presents the evolution of air polishing, its effects on gingiva, hard tooth structures, and dental restorations, as well as its indications and contraindications. Criteria for patient selection, preparation for air polishing, and air polishing techniques are outlined as well as steps for air polishing unit cleanup. Case scenarios highlight the concepts presented and reinforce learning.

AGD Subject Code: 490

Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Outline when tooth polishing is indicated.
  • Compare and contrast rubber-cup polishing and air polishing.
  • Describe current research findings concerning the effects of air polishing on oral soft tissues, oral hard tissues, and dental restorative materials.
  • List the indications and contraindications for patient selection and treatment with the air polishing system.
  • Describe the preparation, precautions, and preventive/protective measures necessary for using the air polishing system.
  • Explain the clinical procedures and protocols for oral air polishing.
  • Describe the required regimen to properly clean, maintain, and sterilize the air polishing system components according to the manufacturer’s directions and within OSHA compliance.
Author Bio(s)

 

John F. Kross, MSc, DMD, received his doctorate in dental medicine from Temple University School of Dentistry in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He completed a fellowship at Temple University Hospital in oral oncology and received a hospital appointment to the Department of Dentistry at the Medical Centers of Delaware (now the Christiana Health Care System). His professional training and experience include practicing general dentistry in Wilmington, Delaware, and in New London, Pennsylvania, as well as instructing students at Delaware Technical Community College in oral pathology. Dr. Kross has received numerous academic awards for his work in oral surgery, fixed partial prosthodontics, periodontics, and endodontics. He has been composing  monographs, manuscripts, and continuing medical education courses since 1991.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Toni M. Roucka, RN, DDS, MA, is an associate professor of restorative dentistry and associate dean for academic affairs at Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine in Alton, Illinois. She maintains an active nursing license and is a Fellow of the American College of Dentists and immediate president of the American Society for Dental Ethics. Dr. Roucka obtained her DDS degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry and master’s degree in population health – bioethics from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Roucka is a nationally recognized speaker on the subject of ethics in dentistry and has taught restorative dentistry at both Marquette University and Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine.

Infection Control: A Review and Update, 2nd Edition

Price: $19.95 
Item # L0735  

Release Date:  July 30, 2013

Review Date: May 16, 2016

Expiration Date: May 15, 2019

 

In the course of the provision of dental care, patients and dental healthcare personnel can be exposed to pathogens through contact with blood, oral and respiratory secretions, and contaminated equipment. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) strives to provide recommendations for infection control in the dental office that are clear, practical, and evidence based. Most of today’s practicing dentists work in a private practice setting, in which patients are seen in an outpatient ambulatory care facility. Without the benefit of working with an infection control specialist, it becomes the dentist’s responsibility to monitor and recommend safe practices.

For the purpose of education, training should be provided to all new employees. Training should also be included with any new procedures that are introduced that may pose a risk. It is important to remember in designing a training program that material and content should be appropriate to the duties of the employee and taught at a level of understanding for every individual involved.

This basic-level course provides an overview of standard precautions and routine practice for infection control in a dental practice. The concept of the "chain of infection" is explained along with the use of personal protective equipment such as gloves, masks, and eyewear. Proper instrument sterilization techniques are outlined.

 

AGD Subject Code: 148
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the modes and mechanisms of transmission of pathogenic organisms.
  • Identify the engineering and work practice controls used to prevent infection.
  • Describe current practices for preventing percutaneous injuries.
  • Outline effective hand hygiene practices.
  • Describe the proper use of personal protective equipment.
  • Differentiate between disinfection and sterilization.
Author Bio(s)

 

Eric Levine, DDS, is a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Endodontics, Prosthodontics and Operative Dentistry of the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland. Dr. Levine also maintains a private practice in Olney, Maryland, with a focus on restorative dentistry. His research interests include the study of dental materials and incorporating technology into practice and teaching.

 

Content Editor

Malodor: Detection and Treatment, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0739  

Release Date: July 31, 2013

Review Date: May 18, 2016

Expiration Date: May 17, 2019

 

Chronic oral malodor, also referred to as halitosis, bad breath, mouth malodor, oral malodor, and fetor oris, is an unpleasant condition that is estimated to affect up to 50% of the population. This common condition is often distressing for patients, causing them social embarrassment and affecting their relationships and self-esteem. Given its prevalence and psychosocial effects, it is no surprise that malodor is one of the chief complaints reported to dental health providers. Effective management depends on identifying the origin of the malodor and instituting the appropriate treatment.

Appropriate for all dental professionals, this basic-level course describes the nature and prevalence of halitosis, reviews the steps for assessing a patient with halitosis, discusses the oral, nonoral, and systemic origins of halitosis, differential diagnosis, and treatment planning. The course also discusses the relationship between oral malodor and oral disease, including gingivitis and periodontitis. Case scenarios highlight the concepts presented and reinforce learning.

AGD Subject Code: 739
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the nature and prevalence of halitosis.
  • Recognize the steps taken in assessing a patient with halitosis.
  • Identify the oral, nonoral, and systemic origins of halitosis.
  • Identify the dental differential diagnosis for halitosis.
  • Outline the dental treatment and management of halitosis.
Author Bio(s)

 

A. J. Barnert, RDH, has been involved in aiding the community since attending the University of Southern California while working toward her bachelor of science degree in dental hygiene. From developing dental health programs in public schools and for underserved children to working for Counseling4Kids to help children in the foster care system, Ms. Barnert has given back to the community in numerous ways. In addition to her undergraduate degree, she also received her master of arts degree in marriage, family, and child counseling from Phillips Graduate Institute in Encino, California, and is a certified children’s social worker. Currently, Ms. Barnert maintains her own private practice, and works with Counseling4Kids, United Behavioral Health, and Wilshire Valley Therapy, as well as for the dentists Robert Wong and Kanako Shimizu in Woodland Hills, California. She is a member of both the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists and the California Family Study Center Alumni Association. As a public speaker, she has presented workshops on interventions to help the bereaved and published on the subject of divorce as an opportunity for growth.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

Fluoride Use in Modern Dental Practice: Action, Effect, and Delivery, 2nd Edition

Price: $19.95 
Item # L0761  

Release Date: July 30, 2013

Review Date: July 20, 2016

Expiration Date: July 19, 2019

 

Dental caries is a chronic, infectious and transmissible disease of multi-factorial origin. It is the single most common chronic disease in children worldwide, including the United States. Dental sealants, nutritional counseling, antimicrobial agents, oral hygiene instruction, early diagnostic measures, and fluorides can be used to manage this disease within a framework of early risk assessment and diagnostic procedures. Fluoride holds a special place in this paradigm because of its documented effectiveness in controlling and reducing dental caries.

This basic-level course discusses the pre-eruptive and post-eruptive mechanisms of fluoride action as well as the sources of fluoride and recommended intake levels. The course examines the latest research on the efficacy, cost-effectiveness, and safety of community water fluoridation in the United States. The processes of demineralization and remineralization are explained along with the risks of fluoridation and the recommended use of fluoride in high-caries-risk patients.

 

AGD Subject Code: 017

 
Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the mechanisms of action of fluoride.
  • Describe the efficacy, cost-effectiveness, and safety of community water fluoridation.
  • Discuss sources of fluoride and recommended intake levels.
  • Identify the risks of fluoridation.
  • State the recommended use of fluoride in high-caries-risk patients.
Author Bio(s)

 

Harold S. Goodman, DDS, MPH, received his bachelor of arts degree from Rutgers University and his dental degree from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. He obtained a master’s degree in public health from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health (now the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health) and completed a Dental Public Health residency program at the University of Michigan. In addition to maintaining a private practice, Dr. Goodman was an associate professor in the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry and director of the Office of Oral Health in the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene for the state of Maryland. Dr. Goodman has written many scientific articles, and in 2015 he received the Myron Allukian, Jr., Lifetime Achievement Award for Outstanding Contributions in Community Dental Programs.

Louis G. DePaola, DDS, MS, is a professor and the assistant dean of clinical affairs in the Department of Oncology and Diagnostic Sciences at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry in Baltimore, Maryland. He received his DDS in 1975 and a master of science degree in oral biology in 1981, both from the University of Maryland. He is a diplomate of the American Board of Oral Medicine and the American College of Dentists, and holds a certificate in prosthodontics. He is the director for dental training for the Pennsylvania/MidAtlantic AIDS Education and Training Center and served as a member of the American Dental Association (ADA) Council on Scientific Affairs from 2002 to 2005. Dr. DePaola has presented at the national meetings of most major dental associations and at numerous international conferences. He has authored or coauthored more than 130 journal articles, book chapters, and abstracts. He serves as a consultant to the ADA, other professional groups, and private industry. Over the past 20 years, Dr. DePaola has been awarded more than 75 research and service grants, many in the field of antiplaque chemotherapeutic agents, HIV/AIDS, management of medically compromised dental patients, rapid salivary diagnostic testing, dental unit waterlines, and infection control. In November of 2015, Dr. DePaola was appointed to the Maryland Board of Dental Examiners.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

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