Disciplines: Dentists
Hours: 50 Contact Hours
Item#: LDTMN

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Minnesota 50-Hour Dentist Pack


Reg. Prices $499.25
Just $349.95
Item # LDTMN
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When available, the Online Course format is included with the hard copy, eBook, or audio book formats!

This product includes the following courses:
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Update of Concepts in Vital Tooth Whitening, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 Hours:3 Contact Hours
Item # L0727  

Release Date: December 3, 2010

Review Date: June 2, 2016

Expiration Date: June 1, 2019

Vital tooth whitening is an aesthetic and conservative treatment for discolored teeth. The popularity of vital tooth whitening has increased dramatically in recent years, as shown by the increased number of products and procedures introduced, ranging from at-home tray whitening and trayless whitening techniques – both dentist prescribed and over the counter (OTC) – to in-office 1-hour whitening systems. Recent years have also seen the rise of nondental options for vital tooth whitening. The increasing number of vital tooth-whitening techniques and materials has created a clinical challenge for dentists and other oral health providers seeking to balance effectiveness and safety. Proper patient selection for vital tooth whitening becomes even more important in this environment.

Most recently, there has been a push to find ways to accelerate and improve the delivery of the whitening process. These include a number of light sources believed to accelerate the breakdown of peroxide and thus speed up the whitening process. Research in this area is controversial, with the literature describing different conclusions about the benefits of light-activated whitening. The popularity of strip-based peroxide delivery represents a departure from the conventional use of a professionally supervised tray system and raises questions about safety and efficacy.

Patient demand for tooth whitening remains high, and oral health providers have more options for treatment, so it is important that clinicians evaluate which of these options is best for their patients. This basic-level course reviews concepts in vital tooth whitening, including recommendations in ADA guidelines; describes evolving issues in vital tooth whitening (e.g., measurement of color change, the color rebound effect, and safety issues); and explains the risk and benefits of established and new technologies.

AGD Subject Code: 781
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

Infection Control and Prevention in the Dental Office, 2nd Edition

Price: $39.95 Hours:4 Contact Hours
Item # L0730  

Release Date: May 10, 2013

Review Date: April 15, 2016

Expiration Date: April 14, 2019

During the delivery of dental care, both patients and dental healthcare workers can be exposed to a wide array of infectious diseases, including HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, influenza, and numerous other viral and bacterial infections. If recommended infection control practices are not followed for each and every patient contact, transmission of infection will occur. In order to minimize the risk of transmission of infectious disease, discipline-specific infection-control guidelines have been published. It is incumbent upon all dental healthcare providers to understand and comply with the principles of infection control whenever and wherever they provide treatment to a patient.

This basic-level course reviews published guidelines and principles of infection control and outlines the methods that can be used to effectively break the chain of infection, including the use of work practice controls, barriers and/or personal protective equipment, and practices of effective cleaning, disinfecting, and sterilization. This course focuses on the six core elements of infection control and is relevant to all dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants.

Western Schools designates this activity for 4 continuing education credits.

AGD Subject Code: 148

Nevada - Fulfills your 4 hour infection control requirement.

This course should not be taken in conjunction with New York Infection Control and Prevention in the Dental Office, 2nd Edition (L0732).

Improving Oral Health Care for Patients With Special Needs, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 Hours:3 Contact Hours
Item # L0734  

Release Date: July 27, 2010

Review Date: June 2, 2016

Expiration Date: June 1, 2019

Recent years have seen a dramatic increase in the number of people with special healthcare needs, and the trend is expected to continue. Population shifts as a result of immigration and other socio-economic factors will persist in straining the current delivery system. The special needs population already faces barriers in obtaining oral health services, and this situation will continue to deteriorate under the present system of care.

As policy makers wrestle with major health disparities experienced by people with special health-care needs, dental professionals must be at the forefront of ensuring adequate delivery of oral healthcare services to this population.

This basic-level course addresses current thinking about the challenges dental professionals face with providing oral healthcare services for people with special needs. It identifies the factors that hinder access to dental care and presents strategies to improve the provision of care for the special needs population. The course includes recommendations for the management and treatment of special needs patients.

AGD Subject Code: 753
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

HPV and Oral Cancer: Exploring the Link

Price: $49.95 Hours:5 Contact Hours
Item # L0731  

Release Date: May 16, 2016

Expiration Date: May 15, 2019

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States; an estimated 79 million Americans are currently infected with HPV and each year approximately 14 million people are newly infected. There is a growing body of research demonstrating the increasing incidence of HPV-related cancer in the oropharynx, which includes the tonsillar area and base of the tongue. As is the case with other cancers, early detection and timely treatment of HPV-related oral cancers can reduce the number of deaths from this disease.

Dental professionals are well positioned to play a role in the education, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of HPV-related oral cancer. Regular dental checkups that include a comprehensive head and neck examination can be beneficial in the early identification of precancerous and cancerous lesions. Dental patients may have questions about their risk of infection, their risk of developing cancer, and the protective value of available HPV vaccines. The established relationship between HPV and oral cancer will require dental providers to expand traditional patient education topics (i.e., tobacco and alcohol) to include information on HPV and develop communication skills appropriate for responding to patient inquiries and concerns as part of a comprehensive approach to preventive oral health care.

This intermediate-level course provides dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants with general information about HPV, evidence of the association between oral HPV and oral cancer, and effective ways to further communicate this information to patients. This course provides dental professionals with information that will enable them to effectively meet the challenges they face as the link between HPV and oral health continues to emerge.

AGD Subject Code: 750
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 5 continuing education credits.

Periodontal Disease: Pathophysiology, Risk Factors, and Systemic Links, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 Hours:3 Contact Hours
Item # L0780  

Release Date: July 31, 2013

Review Date: September 9, 2016

Expiration Date: September 8, 2019

Periodontal disease is the primary cause of tooth loss in adults. Nearly half of all adults age 30 and older in the United States suffer from periodontal disease; the incidence of periodontal disease increases as people age, with approximately 70% of adults age 65 and older having the disease. The prevalence of periodontal disease varies among ethnic groups and between genders. Increased incidence of periodontal disease has been linked to poverty, lower levels of education, and smoking.

The symptoms of periodontal disease range from those that are nearly undetectable by the patient to those that are severe and alarming. All too often, periodontitis is a silent destroyer of oral health because pain is absent unless an acute infection occurs.

This basic-level course reviews the risk factors associated with periodontal disease, and discusses the potential links between periodontal disease and systemic conditions, such as diabetes, obesity, coronary heart disease, osteoporosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. The course describes the etiology and pathophysiology of periodontal disease, focusing on microbiology, viral causes, the autoimmune and inflammatory response, resident and infiltrating cells of the periodontium, and matrix metalloproteinases. The course prepares dental professionals to recognize periodontal disease and take steps to prevent this condition and to treat patients who already have or are at risk for developing periodontal disease.

 

AGD Subject Code: 490

 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

Implant-Related Nerve Injuries

Price: $29.95 Hours:3 Contact Hours
Item # L0748  

Release Date: June 7, 2016

Expiration Date: June 6, 2019

According to the American Academy of Implant Dentistry there are currently 3 million people in the United States with dental implants, and that number is growing by 500,000 per year. While the success rate of implants has been reported to be 98%, there are still some risks involved. Because of their ability to restore esthetics and function, dental implants have become the preferred option for replacing nonrestorable and missing teeth. Despite high success rates, however, many complications have been encountered with their use.

One of the most serious complications is the alteration of sensation after implant placement in the posterior mandible. The prevalence of this type of a complication has been reported to be as high as 13%. This sensatory change can occur as a result of injury to the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) or the lingual nerve from traumatic local anesthetic injections or during dental implant osteotomy or placement. This complication is one of the most unpleasant experiences for both the patient and the dentist, so every precaution should be taken to avoid it. Once it happens, the dentist should provide the patient with appropriate care and should know when to refer the patient to a microneurosurgeon. Depending on the degree of nerve injury, alteration in sensation varies from mild paresthesia to complete anesthesia. Injuries sustained may be transient, manageable, or, in certain cases, permanent.

This intermediate-level course familiarizes dental professionals with different types of nerve injuries related to implant placement and their causes, and the areas within the oral cavity at increased risk for such injuries. The course discusses how the dental professional can properly plan implant placement to avoid nerve injury and how to treat nerve injuries if they do occur.

AGD Subject Code: 690
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

Nutrition for the Dental Patient, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 Hours:3 Contact Hours
Item # L0752  

Release Date: July 30, 2013

Review Date: July 5, 2016

Expiration Date: July 4, 2019

Poor nutrition can lead to caries, periodontal problems, and loss of teeth and bone. In addition, nutritional problems can put our patients at risk for certain systemic diseases and conditions such as heart problems, cancer, stroke and diabetes. This basic-level course reviews several important areas concerning proper nutrition for the dental patient including antioxidants, sugars, fats, the special nutritional needs of pregnant patients, and the intake of mercury, calcium and Vitamin D.


AGD Subject Code: 150

Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

The Impact of Vascular and Cardiovascular Diseases on Oral Health, 2nd Edition

Price: $39.95 Hours:4 Contact Hours
Item # L0755  

Release Date: July 27, 2010

Review Date: July 8, 2016

Expiration Date: July 7, 2019

The oral presentation of microvascular diseases such as diabetes is well documented, but many common cardiovascular conditions, including ischemic heart disease, also present with oral manifestations. In addition, patients with specific vascular diseases, such as granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly called Wegener’s granulomatosis), may present with pathognomonic oral lesions. In some instances, oral involvement precedes the appearance of other symptoms or lesions at other locations. To aid in diagnosis and guide the approach to dental treatment, dental healthcare professionals should recognize oral manifestations of cardiovascular diseases and other systemic or multiorgan diseases with a vascular component. A thorough understanding of the potential oral side effects of therapeutic agents commonly used to treat cardiovascular diseases is very helpful in overall patient management.

This intermediate-level course addresses current concepts regarding the relationship between oral health and vascular and cardiovascular diseases, including the impact on oral health of common cardiovascular pharmacotherapies. This course is intended for dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants, as well as other healthcare professionals involved in the management of patients with selected vascular and cardiovascular diseases.

AGD Subject Code: 730
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 4 continuing education credits.

Erosion-Related Tooth Wear: Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment, 2nd Edition

Price: $39.95 Hours:4 Contact Hours
Item # L0757  

Release Date: July 25, 2010

Review Date: July 11, 2016

Expiration Date: July 10, 2019

Tooth wear is defined as the loss of dental hard tissue by a chemical or mechanical process that does not involve bacteria. The mechanisms of tooth wear include erosion, attrition, abrasion, and abfraction. Dental erosion results from chemical processes and is an important cause of tooth tissue loss in both children and adults. The damage caused by erosion can be accelerated when it occurs in combination with attrition or abrasion.

Early recognition of tooth wear is essential to successful management and prevention of disease progression. The primary dental care team is in the ideal position to provide this care to patients with dental erosion and other forms of tooth wear. This intermediate-level course provides dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants with an overview of the etiology of tooth wear and explains the pathogenic processes involved in tooth erosion. It describes the necessary protocol for assessing erosion in patients and making a diagnosis. Preventive measures and treatment approaches are included.

 

AGD Subject Code: 741

 
Western Schools designates this activity for 4 continuing education credits.

Benign Jaw Lesions

Price: $29.95 Hours:3 Contact Hours
Item # L0772  

Release Date: August 10, 2016

Expiration Date: August 9, 2019

Although benign conditions are non-cancerous, some benign conditions of the oral cavity may look like cancer or precancerous conditions. Often, patients have symptoms that include swelling, pain, tenderness, and unexplained tooth mobility; some tumors are discovered on routine dental x-rays, whereas others are found on routine examinations of the oral cavity and teeth. These tumors can impinge on local structures, causing damage to otherwise healthy tissue. Therefore it is important for the dental team to recognize the symptoms and radiographic presentations of lesions in order to treat affected patients or refer them in a timely manner.

This intermediate-level course is appropriate for dentists, hygienists, and assistants, and familiarizes the dental team with the presentation of benign jaw lesions, which they may encounter in their dental practice. This course outlines the different benign lesions that may present in the hard tissue of the jaws. The subject material is categorized into ondontogenic cysts, nonodontogenic cysts, benign odontogenic tumors, benign nonodontogenic tumors, and other lesions that fall outside of those categories such as giant cell granuloma, ossifying fibroma and lingual salivary gland defects.  The clinical and radiographic, CBCT and MRI presentations of these lesions are discussed.  

 

AGD Subject Code: 730

 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Comprehensive Review for Dental Professionals

Price: $29.95 Hours:3 Contact Hours
Item # L0776  

Release Date: August 26, 2016

Expiration Date: August 25, 2019

Sleep-disordered breathing is a common disorder, causing a range of harmful clinical, social, and economic sequelae. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common sleep-related breathing disorder. The prevalence of OSA is increasing rapidly. Dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants are well positioned to recognize this disorder, refer patients for appropriate testing, and successfully treat patients with oral appliances. Dental professionals trained in treating sleep-disordered breathing are a vital part of a multidisciplinary team on the forefront of dealing with this serious public health issue.

This course reviews OSA from a dental perspective. It addresses current findings on the links between overall health and OSA and cites common presenting symptoms likely to be encountered in the dental practice. This intermediate-level course discusses the latest evidence-based diagnostic approaches for OSA and outlines recommended treatment strategies, including oral appliances and surgical intervention, to mitigate the health impact of this common condition. 

 

AGD Subject Code: 160
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

Mental Health Issues and Special Care Patients

Price: $19.95 Hours:2 Contact Hours
Item # L0800  

Release Date: December 8, 2016

Expiration Date: December 7, 2019

Millions of adults in the U.S. experience mental illness in some form. Dentists must be able to recognize the signs and symptoms of mental illness and the effects certain disorders may have on oral health. Additionally, many antipsychotic medications have deleterious side effects that can impact oral health. Dental professionals should recognize these side effects, and be able to treat and advise their patients accordingly. Additionally due to the episodic nature of some mental disorders, the dental team must be flexible, be able to augment treatment schedules, and provide patient-focused care in order to accommodate the unique needs patients with mental illness present with.

Appropriate for dentists, dental hygienists and dental assistants, this basic-level course reviews the type, severity and stages of mental illnesses, the effect that mental illness has on mood, motivation and self-esteem, the lack of perception a person with mental illness may have of their oral health problems, the effect of patients’ habits and lifestyles on their ability to sustain self-care and dental attendance, the side effects of medication and finally, how to help these patients overcome barriers to oral health care.   


AGD Subject Code: 750
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

Tobacco Cessation: The Dental Health Professional's Role, Updated 1st Edition

Price: $29.95 Hours:3 Contact Hours
Item # L0723  

Release Date: January 30, 2013

Revised Date: January 15, 2016

Expiration Date: January 14, 2019

The prevalence of smoking in the United States has hovered at approximately 20% of the population for each of the last five years, but there has been an increase in the use of smokeless tobacco products.  Healthcare professionals must redouble their efforts to intervene with all patients who continue to smoke. This basic-level course provides dental professionals with background and guidelines for tobacco interventions in clinical practice.  The course addresses the prevalence of smoking of combustible tobacco and the use of smokeless tobacco products, the health risks of tobacco use and tobacco exposure, the effects of nicotine on human physiology and their implications for nicotine dependency and withdrawal.  Techniques for tobacco intervention and the pharmacotherapy used in tobacco cessation are described for both the smoking of combustible tobacco and the use of smokeless tobacco.

AGD Subject Code: 158

Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

Arizona RDH - Fulfills tobacco cessation elective.

 

Dental Ethics and the Digital Age - 3-Hour

Price: $29.95 Hours:3 Contact Hours
Item # L0724  

Release Date: January 15, 2016

Expiration Date: January 14, 2019

The Hippocratic Oath provides medical practitioners with a framework for the ethical practice of medicine by professing a set of obligations to which physicians are bound. As is evident from the language of the oath, Hippocrates believed that the practice of medicine was both an art and a privilege and that patients had rights of their own.

Dentistry has adopted many of the ideals of the Hippocratic Oath into its current professional codes of ethics as well as the oaths that dental and hygiene students take upon graduation from dental school. The American Dental Association Principles of Ethics and Codes of Professional Conduct (ADA Code) and the Code of Ethics of the American Dental Hygienist Association (ADHA) are living documents and are revised periodically to address new ethical issues that arise within the profession. The practice of dentistry is multifaceted. Not only must dental professionals have the technical skills to treat patients appropriately and safely, they must also practice within a professional ethical framework that is sometimes more challenging than the dental procedures themselves.

This basic-level course helps dental professionals gain a better understanding of dental ethics, professionalism, and current ethical challenges to the profession, with particular emphasis on the impact of the digital age. Dental ethics have deep roots in history and this course takes an in-depth look at the events that forged the basis of modern day ethics and professionalism in dentistry. Our electronic world is expanding exponentially and advancing technology provides both opportunities and challenges. Dental professionals may be eager to incorporate the latest technologies into their practices and into their private lives, but must consider the ethical implications of doing so. This course explores some of the issues in this new frontier, for example, the rise of cyberbullying and the dentist’s obligation in these cases. Using a systematic, case-based approach, this course provides dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants with the tools to recognize and navigate through the complex ethical issues that may arise in today’s practice.

AGD Subject Code: 555

Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

Fulfills Ethics requirement in the following states: Arizona, Hawaii, Kansas, Minnesota, North Dakota, and Oklahoma.

Three Drug Classes Every Dental Professional Should Know: Antibiotics, Analgesics, and Anesthetics

Price: $39.95 Hours:4 Contact Hours
Item # L0726  

Release Date: March 16, 2016

Expiration Date: March 15, 2019

Oral healthcare professionals (OHCPs) are routinely involved with the selection and prescription of medications for their patients. This course is designed to help them become better-informed prescribers of the top three drug classes employed in dentistry: antibiotics, analgesics, and local anesthetics. Patient safety is the number one concern. Every OHCP should have a strong baseline knowledge of the pharmacology of each of these drug classes and the latest recommendations on appropriate prescribing practices in order to avoid drug-drug interactions. As a prescriber, every dentist takes a professional oath to “do no harm,” and nowhere is this mandate more relevant than in today’s busy dental practice that serves patients with complex medical histories involving multiple chronic diseases and polypharmacy.

Despite significant growth in prescription drug use over the past 20 years, a 2013 study of pharmacology education in North American dental schools found substantial variation among pharmacology course offerings and no increase in the number of hours of pharmacology training over the past three decades. This leaves dental professionals ever more reliant on continuing education to supplement and expand their pharmacology knowledge. The patients who are presenting to dental offices for treatment today are often medically complex and their treatment may require the use of antibiotics, analgesics, and local anesthetics. Oral healthcare professionals need to be knowledgeable about these drug classes in order to better serve their patients.

This intermediate-level course is specifically designed for all members of the dental healthcare team: dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants. Since the goal of providing medication in dentistry is to ensure selection of the right drug at the right time and at the right dose for the right patient and the right procedure, the information presented in this course should be considered essential knowledge for all OHCPs, both seasoned and newly credentialed.

AGD Subject Code: 344
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 4 continuing education credits.
 
This course is a combined version of, and should not be taken in conjunction with, L0713, L0714, and L0725.

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