Disciplines:

Dental Hygienist

Hours: 25 Contact Hours
Item#: LH1MN

 

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Minnesota 25-Hour Dental Hygienist Bundle


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Item # LH1MN
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Update of Concepts in Vital Tooth Whitening, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0727  

Release Date: December 3, 2010

Review Date: June 2, 2016

Expiration Date: June 1, 2019

 

Vital tooth whitening is an aesthetic and conservative treatment for discolored teeth. The popularity of vital tooth whitening has increased dramatically in recent years, as shown by the increased number of products and procedures introduced, ranging from at-home tray whitening and trayless whitening techniques – both dentist prescribed and over the counter (OTC) – to in-office 1-hour whitening systems. Recent years have also seen the rise of nondental options for vital tooth whitening. The increasing number of vital tooth-whitening techniques and materials has created a clinical challenge for dentists and other oral health providers seeking to balance effectiveness and safety. Proper patient selection for vital tooth whitening becomes even more important in this environment.

Most recently, there has been a push to find ways to accelerate and improve the delivery of the whitening process. These include a number of light sources believed to accelerate the breakdown of peroxide and thus speed up the whitening process. Research in this area is controversial, with the literature describing different conclusions about the benefits of light-activated whitening. The popularity of strip-based peroxide delivery represents a departure from the conventional use of a professionally supervised tray system and raises questions about safety and efficacy.

Patient demand for tooth whitening remains high, and oral health providers have more options for treatment, so it is important that clinicians evaluate which of these options is best for their patients. This basic-level course reviews concepts in vital tooth whitening, including recommendations in ADA guidelines; describes evolving issues in vital tooth whitening (e.g., measurement of color change, the color rebound effect, and safety issues); and explains the risk and benefits of established and new technologies.

 

AGD Subject Code: 781
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe evolving issues in vital tooth whitening, including measuring color change.
  • Explain prewhitening evaluations and mechanisms underlying vital tooth whitening.
  • Outline current vital tooth-whitening methods and materials.
  • Identify the color rebound effect and safety issues associated with vital tooth whitening.
Author Bio(s)

 

John F. Kross, MSc, DMD, received his doctorate in dental medicine from Temple University School of Dentistry in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He completed a fellowship at Temple University Hospital in oral oncology and received a hospital appointment to the Department of Dentistry at the Medical Centers of Delaware (now the Christiana Health Care System). His professional training and experience include practicing general dentistry in Wilmington, Delaware, and in New London, Pennsylvania, as well as instructing students at Delaware Technical Community College in oral pathology. Dr. Kross has received numerous academic awards for his work in oral surgery, fixed partial prosthodontics, periodontics, and endodontics. He has been composing monographs, manuscripts, and continuing medical education courses since 1991.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Raymond K. Martin, DDS, MAGD, graduated in 1979 from Texas Tech University with a bachelor’s degree in microbiology and earned his DDS in 1983 from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. He then went on to study at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine in the General Practice Residency Program. Dr. Martin began his work in dental risk management after being awarded a Mastership in the Academy of General Dentistry. He consults with 20 legal firms as an expert witness and lectures extensively on dental risk management and ethics in dentistry. In addition, Dr. Martin teaches CAD/CAM dentistry as a CEREC mentor and has served as a Key Opinion Leader for an international dental implant manufacturer. Dr. Martin has maintained a private practice for more than three decades and is currently president of the Massachusetts Dental Society. He has served the American Dental Association on the Future of Dentistry work group and is currently a member of the Council on Government Affairs.

Managing the Adult Dental Phobic Patient, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0737  

Release Date:  July 31, 2013

Review Date: May 16, 2016

Expiration Date: May 15, 2019

 

Dental phobia may be a universal barrier to seeking oral health care. Dental phobics are not comfortable seeking regular dental care, even when dental problems arise. The dental team needs to be aware of the concerns of this population in order to reduce fear and anxiety and provide needed oral health care.

This basic-level course distinguishes between the definitions of fear, anxiety, and phobia. It identifies the most common reactions that accompany phobias and common reasons for avoidance of dental treatment. The course describes the behavioral treatment options for anxious dental patients and techniques for reducing general anxiety in dental patients. This course will provide dental professionals with basic knowledge and information on dental fear and avoidance that will enable them to diagnose and manage patients who experience dental-related anxiety, fear, and phobia. This knowledge will help dental professionals prepare for these patients and their unique needs and help these patients feel more comfortable seeking their care in the future.

AGD Subject Code: 153; California Course #03-4640-16-737

 

Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Define fear, anxiety, and phobia and their common behavioral manifestations.
  • Distinguish among the four types of anxiety.
  • Identify the techniques used to reduce anxiety in dental patients.
  • Describe the psychological and pharmacological treatment techniques used to manage dental fears, phobias, and anxiety.
  • Describe an effective local injection technique used for fearful or phobic dental patients.
Author Bio(s)

 

Ellen Dietz-Bourguignon, BS, CDA-Emeritus, earned her bachelor of science degree in allied health education in dental auxiliary utilization and a community college teaching certificate from the State University of New York at Buffalo. She began her dental career as an associate-degreed certified dental assistant in private practice. Following a 7-year dental assisting teaching career at Orange County Community College, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Erie County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, and Niagara County Community College, she began writing on dental topics for Dental Assisting Magazine, eventually rising to the position of managing editor. Ms. Dietz-Bourguignon has worked in dental marketing, project management, and product development at Semantodontics and in legal administration for the Arizona State Board of Dental Examiners. She has published five books in the dental assisting market, including Dental Office Management and Safety Standards and Infection Control for Dental Assistants, and has been keynote speaker at the American Dental Assistants Association Annual Session. Her articles have appeared in numerous journals, including The Dental Assistant, Dentist, The Dental Student, Dental Economics, RDH, and Dental Teamwork.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Toni M. Roucka, RN, DDS, MA, is an associate professor of restorative dentistry and associate dean for academic affairs at Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine in Alton, Illinois. She maintains an active nursing license and is a Fellow of the American College of Dentists and immediate president of the American Society for Dental Ethics. Dr. Roucka obtained her DDS degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry and master’s degree in population health – bioethics from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Roucka is a nationally recognized speaker on the subject of ethics in dentistry and has taught restorative dentistry at both Marquette University and Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine.

Improving Oral Health Care for Patients With Special Needs, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0734  

Release Date: July 27, 2010

Review Date: June 2, 2016

Expiration Date: June 1, 2019

 

Recent years have seen a dramatic increase in the number of people with special healthcare needs, and the trend is expected to continue. Population shifts as a result of immigration and other socio-economic factors will persist in straining the current delivery system. The special needs population already faces barriers in obtaining oral health services, and this situation will continue to deteriorate under the present system of care.

As policy makers wrestle with major health disparities experienced by people with special health-care needs, dental professionals must be at the forefront of ensuring adequate delivery of oral healthcare services to this population.

This basic-level course addresses current thinking about the challenges dental professionals face with providing oral healthcare services for people with special needs. It identifies the factors that hinder access to dental care and presents strategies to improve the provision of care for the special needs population. The course includes recommendations for the management and treatment of special needs patients.

 

AGD Subject Code: 753
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Define patient with special needs.
  • Describe the oral health challenges of patients with special needs.
  • Identify the factors that hinder access to dental care for patients with special needs.
  • Discuss recommendations for the management and treatment of patients with special needs.
  • Identify strategies for improving oral health and access to care for patients with special needs.
Author Bio(s)

 

John F. Kross, MSc, DMD, received his doctorate in dental medicine from Temple University School of Dentistry in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He completed a fellowship at Temple University Hospital in oral oncology and received a hospital appointment to the Department of Dentistry at the Medical Centers of Delaware (now the Christiana Health Care System). His professional training and experience include practicing general dentistry in Wilmington, Delaware, and in New London, Pennsylvania, as well as instructing students at Delaware Technical Community College in oral pathology. Dr. Kross has received numerous academic awards for his work in oral surgery, fixed partial prosthodontics, periodontics, and endodontics. He has been composing monographs, manuscripts, and continuing medical education courses since 1991.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Toni M. Roucka, RN, DDS, MA, is an associate professor of restorative dentistry and associate dean for academic affairs at Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine in Alton, Illinois. She maintains an active nursing license and is a Fellow of the American College of Dentists and immediate president of the American Society for Dental Ethics. Dr. Roucka obtained her DDS degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry and master’s degree in population health – bioethics from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Roucka is a nationally recognized speaker on the subject of ethics in dentistry and has taught restorative dentistry at both Marquette University and Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine.

Managing Dry Mouth, 2nd Edition

Price: $19.95 
Item # L0741  

Release Date: July 30, 2013

Review Date: May 12, 2016

Expiration Date: May 11, 2019

 

The oral and general health of individuals is determined by, and dependent on, an adequate salivary flow. Salivary clearance is essential to reducing the cariogenic potential of foodstuffs as well as providing a mechanism for remineralization of dental enamel after minor assaults such as ingestion of acidic foods and beverages. This course addresses dry mouth, referred to as xerostomia, which is a common symptom often associated with a decrease in the amount and/or quality of saliva (also called hyposalivation). Xerostomia is not a disease unto itself but may be a symptom of a disease or a side effect of medical treatment. It is also a common daily condition among the patient population older than age 65. Although not life-threatening, dry mouth can produce serious negative effects on the patient’s quality of life. These effects may include changes in dietary habits and subsequent nutritional status, difficulty with speech, a decrease in taste, intolerance to removable dental prostheses, and an increased susceptibility to dental caries.

This basic-level course describes the role that saliva plays in general and dental health, as well as the causes and consequences of compromised salivary production. Dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants will gain an understanding of the scope of this problem, and increase their ability to identify and manage this condition.

 

AGD Subject Code: 750
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the composition and functions of saliva.
  • Identify the signs and symptoms of dry mouth.
  • Identify potential causes of dry mouth.
  • Describe the dental management and treatment of dry mouth.
Author Bio(s)

 

Gregori M. Kurtzman, DDS, MAGD, FACD, is in private general practice in Silver Spring, Maryland. He has lectured both nationally and internationally on the topics of restorative dentistry, endodontics, dental implant surgery, and prosthetics and has had numerous journal articles published in peer-reviewed publications. In addition, Dr. Kurtzman is on the editorial board of numerous publications and is a consultant and clinical evaluator to multiple dental manufacturers. He has earned Fellowships in the Academy of General Dentistry, the International Congress of Oral Implantologists, the Pierre Fauchard Academy, and the American College of Dentists, as well as Masterships in the Academy of General Dentistry and the Implant Prosthetic Section of the International Congress of Oral Implantologists. He also holds Diplomate status in the International Congress of Oral Implantology.

Howard E. Strassler, DMD, FADM, FAGD, is professor and director of operative dentistry at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry in the Department of Endodontics, Prosthodontics and Operative Dentistry. He has lectured nationally and internationally on techniques and selection of dental materials in clinical use and aesthetic restorative dentistry. He is a Fellow in the Academy of Dental Materials and the Academy of General Dentistry, as well as a member of the American Dental Association, the Academy of Operative Dentistry, and the International Association of Dental Research. Dr. Strassler is on the editorial board of numerous publications and is a consultant to and clinical evaluator for more than 15 dental manufacturers. Dr. Strassler has published more than 400 articles in the field of restorative dentistry and innovations in dental practice and has coauthored seven chapters in textbooks. He has presented at more than 425 programs, including most of the major programs throughout the United States, Canada, and Europe. Dr. Strassler has a general practice in Baltimore, Maryland, that is limited to restorative dentistry and aesthetics.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Raymond K. Martin, DDS, MAGD, graduated in 1979 from Texas Tech University with a bachelor’s degree in microbiology and earned his DDS in 1983 from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. He then went on to study at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine in the General Practice Residency Program. Dr. Martin began his work in dental risk management after being awarded a Mastership in the Academy of General Dentistry. He consults with 20 legal firms as an expert witness and lectures extensively on dental risk management and ethics in dentistry. In addition, Dr. Martin teaches CAD/CAM dentistry as a CEREC mentor and has served as a Key Opinion Leader for an international dental implant manufacturer. Dr. Martin has maintained a private practice for more than three decades and is currently president of the Massachusetts Dental Society. He has served the American Dental Association on the Future of Dentistry work group and is currently a member of the Council on Government Affairs.

The Impact of Vascular and Cardiovascular Diseases on Oral Health, 2nd Edition

Price: $39.95 
Item # L0755  

Release Date: July 27, 2010

Review Date: July 8, 2016

Expiration Date: July 7, 2019

 

The oral presentation of microvascular diseases such as diabetes is well documented, but many common cardiovascular conditions, including ischemic heart disease, also present with oral manifestations. In addition, patients with specific vascular diseases, such as granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly called Wegener’s granulomatosis), may present with pathognomonic oral lesions. In some instances, oral involvement precedes the appearance of other symptoms or lesions at other locations. To aid in diagnosis and guide the approach to dental treatment, dental healthcare professionals should recognize oral manifestations of cardiovascular diseases and other systemic or multiorgan diseases with a vascular component. A thorough understanding of the potential oral side effects of therapeutic agents commonly used to treat cardiovascular diseases is very helpful in overall patient management.

This intermediate-level course addresses current concepts regarding the relationship between oral health and vascular and cardiovascular diseases, including the impact on oral health of common cardiovascular pharmacotherapies. This course is intended for dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants, as well as other healthcare professionals involved in the management of patients with selected vascular and cardiovascular diseases.

 

AGD Subject Code: 730
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 4 continuing education credits.

 

 

Disclosures

 

  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.

 

Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Discuss the prevalence and history of cardiovascular disease and its relationship with periodontal disease.
  • Describe the signs, symptoms, and oral manifestations of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes.
  • List oral presentations of cardiac agents used in treating cardiovascular disease.
  • Identify oral manifestations of congenital cardiovascular diseases and diseases with a vascular component.
  • Explain oral healthcare recommendations for patients with selected cardiovascular conditions.
Author Bio(s)

 

John F. Kross, DMD, MSc, received his doctorate in dental medicine from Temple University School of Dentistry in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He completed a fellowship at Temple University Hospital in oral oncology and received a hospital appointment to the Department of Dentistry at the Medical Centers of Delaware (now the Christiana Health Care System). His professional training and experience include practicing general dentistry in Wilmington, Delaware, and in New London, Pennsylvania, as well as instructing students at Delaware Technical Community College in oral pathology. Dr. Kross has received numerous academic awards for his work in oral surgery, fixed partial prosthodontics, periodontics, and endodontics. He has been composing monographs, manuscripts, and continuing medical education courses since 1991.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Paul Subar, DDS, EdD, FACD, is an assistant professor of dental practice and director of the Special Care Clinic and Hospital Dentistry at the University of the Pacific, Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry in San Francisco, California. Dr. Subar earned his bachelor’s degree in biochemistry and molecular biology at the University of California, Santa Cruz; his DDS at the University of California, Los Angeles; his advanced training in hospital dentistry at the University of California Los Angeles Medical Center; and his doctorate of education at the Benerd School of Education, University of the Pacific.

Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

Fluoride Use in Modern Dental Practice: Action, Effect, and Delivery, 2nd Edition

Price: $19.95 
Item # L0761  

Release Date: July 30, 2013

Review Date: July 20, 2016

Expiration Date: July 19, 2019

 

Dental caries is a chronic, infectious and transmissible disease of multi-factorial origin. It is the single most common chronic disease in children worldwide, including the United States. Dental sealants, nutritional counseling, antimicrobial agents, oral hygiene instruction, early diagnostic measures, and fluorides can be used to manage this disease within a framework of early risk assessment and diagnostic procedures. Fluoride holds a special place in this paradigm because of its documented effectiveness in controlling and reducing dental caries.

This basic-level course discusses the pre-eruptive and post-eruptive mechanisms of fluoride action as well as the sources of fluoride and recommended intake levels. The course examines the latest research on the efficacy, cost-effectiveness, and safety of community water fluoridation in the United States. The processes of demineralization and remineralization are explained along with the risks of fluoridation and the recommended use of fluoride in high-caries-risk patients.

 

AGD Subject Code: 017

 
Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the mechanisms of action of fluoride.
  • Describe the efficacy, cost-effectiveness, and safety of community water fluoridation.
  • Discuss sources of fluoride and recommended intake levels.
  • Identify the risks of fluoridation.
  • State the recommended use of fluoride in high-caries-risk patients.
Author Bio(s)

 

Harold S. Goodman, DDS, MPH, received his bachelor of arts degree from Rutgers University and his dental degree from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. He obtained a master’s degree in public health from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health (now the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health) and completed a Dental Public Health residency program at the University of Michigan. In addition to maintaining a private practice, Dr. Goodman was an associate professor in the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry and director of the Office of Oral Health in the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene for the state of Maryland. Dr. Goodman has written many scientific articles, and in 2015 he received the Myron Allukian, Jr., Lifetime Achievement Award for Outstanding Contributions in Community Dental Programs.

Louis G. DePaola, DDS, MS, is a professor and the assistant dean of clinical affairs in the Department of Oncology and Diagnostic Sciences at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry in Baltimore, Maryland. He received his DDS in 1975 and a master of science degree in oral biology in 1981, both from the University of Maryland. He is a diplomate of the American Board of Oral Medicine and the American College of Dentists, and holds a certificate in prosthodontics. He is the director for dental training for the Pennsylvania/MidAtlantic AIDS Education and Training Center and served as a member of the American Dental Association (ADA) Council on Scientific Affairs from 2002 to 2005. Dr. DePaola has presented at the national meetings of most major dental associations and at numerous international conferences. He has authored or coauthored more than 130 journal articles, book chapters, and abstracts. He serves as a consultant to the ADA, other professional groups, and private industry. Over the past 20 years, Dr. DePaola has been awarded more than 75 research and service grants, many in the field of antiplaque chemotherapeutic agents, HIV/AIDS, management of medically compromised dental patients, rapid salivary diagnostic testing, dental unit waterlines, and infection control. In November of 2015, Dr. DePaola was appointed to the Maryland Board of Dental Examiners.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

Occupational Environmental Hazards in the Dental Office: Health Risks and Preventive Measures, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0764  

Release Date: July 30, 2013

Review Date: July 21, 2016

Expiration Date: July 20, 2019

 

There are many potential occupational health hazards associated with working in a dental office. Some health risks have long been known to the dental profession; others have only more recently been discovered as potential health risks. No member of the dental team is immune to these potential hazards. Every team member must take precautions and employ preventive measures to reduce personal health risks associated with occupational hazards.

This basic-level course presents information on the health risks associated with mercury, radiation, caustic agents, nitrous oxide, oxygen and ethylene oxide, airborne particles and contaminants, latex allergies, white visible light and dental lasers, and bonding materials and acrylics. Also discussed are steps to help prevent carpal tunnel syndrome and minimize hazardous noise levels in dental practice.

Using the latest information, the dental team can implement or update its hazard communication and/or office safety programs and heighten awareness among both experienced employees and new hires.

 

AGD Subject Code: 130
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Identify common health risks and preventive measures associated with mercury, radiation, and hazardous chemicals used in dentistry.
  • Identify common health risks and preventive measures associated with noxious gases and bioaerosols in dentistry.
  • Identify common health risks and preventive measures associated with latex, visible white light, dental lasers, and bonding materials.
  • Identify common health risks and preventive measures associated with hazardous noise levels.
  • Identify common health risks and preventive measures associated with carpal tunnel syndrome and hand injuries.
Author Bio(s)

 

Ellen Dietz-Bourguignon, BS, CDA-Emeritus, earned her bachelor of science degree in allied health education in dental auxiliary utilization and a community college teaching certificate from the State University of New York at Buffalo. She began her dental career as an associate-degreed certified dental assistant in private practice. Following a 7-year dental assisting teaching career at Orange County Community College, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Erie County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, and Niagara County Community College, she began writing on dental topics for Dental Assisting Magazine, eventually rising to the position of managing editor. Ms. Dietz-Bourguignon has worked in dental marketing, project management, and product development at Semantodontics and in legal administration for the Arizona State Board of Dental Examiners. She has published five books in the dental assisting market, including Dental Office Management and Safety Standards and Infection Control for Dental Assistants, and has been keynote speaker at the American Dental Assistants Association Annual Session. Her articles have appeared in numerous journals, including The Dental Assistant, Dentist, The Dental Student, Dental Economics, RDH, and Dental Teamwork.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

Dental Ethics and the Digital Age: 3 Hour, Updated 1st Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0948  

Review Date: August 7, 2018

Expiration Date: August 7, 2021

Original Release Date: January 28, 2016

The practice of dentistry is multifaceted. Not only must dental professionals have the technical skills to treat patients appropriately and safely, they must also practice within a professional ethical framework that is sometimes more challenging than the dental procedures themselves. This basic-level course helps dental professionals gain a better understanding of dental ethics, professionalism, and current ethical challenges to the profession, with particular emphasis on the impact of the digital age. Dental professionals may be eager to incorporate the latest technologies into their practices and into their private lives, but must consider the ethical implications of doing so.

 

AGD Subject Code:  555

Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

This course should not be taken in conjunction with L0900 - Dental Ethics and the Digital Age: 2 Hour, Updated 1st Edition.

Fulfills Ethics requirement in the following states: Arizona, Hawaii, Kansas, Minnesota, North Dakota, and Oklahoma.

This course is the updated version of course L0724 - Dental Ethics and the Digital Age: 3 Hour

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the evolution of healthcare ethics, including events that affected development of the principles of ethics that guide the dental profession.
  • Describe how codes of ethics and concepts of professionalism guide the dental practitioner’s
    relationships and obligations.
  • Discuss the relationship of ethics to legal obligations.
  • Identify current and emerging ethical challenges facing dental professionals.
  • Describe how ethical decision making models help dental professionals recognize and address
    ethical dilemmas in practice.
Author Bio(s)

Toni M. Roucka, RN, DDS, MA, is an associate professor and associate dean for academic affairs at Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine in Alton, Illinois. She is a Fellow of the American College of Dentists and current president of the American Society for Dental Ethics, a special section of the American College of Dentists. Dr. Roucka obtained her DDS degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry and master’s degree in population health – bioethics from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Roucka is a nationally recognized speaker and has written extensively on the subject of ethics in dentistry. She currently writes a regular ethics column for General Dentistry, the journal of the Academy of General Dentistry.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Odette Aguirre, DDS, MS, MPH, is Assistant Clinical Professor in the Department of Biomedical and Applied Sciences at Indiana University School of Dentistry in Indianapolis, Indiana, and Affiliate Faculty at the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies at Indiana University, in Bloomington, Indiana. She has recently been nominated as a Fellow of the American College of Dentists and serves as a Member-at-Large of the American Society for Dental Ethics, a special section of the American College of Dentists. Dr. Aguirre obtained her DDS degree from Universidad Francisco MarroquĂ­n in Guatemala City, where she grew up. After graduation, she completed a General Practice Residency at Eastman Dental Center in Rochester, NY, where she also obtained an MS from the University of Rochester. She obtained a bioethics degree from Indiana University’s Department of Philosophy and an MPH from the Fairbanks School of Public Health. At IUSD, she is Director of the “Ethics and Professionalism” courses for first and second year dental students, and co-leads ethics rounds and a clinical ethics consultation service for third and fourth year dental students. Dr. Aguirre is IUSD’s Director of Interprofessional Ethics Seminars, a series of workshops with various healthcare professionals and students, meant to foster collaborative ethics discussions. She is Associate Producer of a series of ethical dilemma videos in a collaboration between IUSD and the American College of Dentists.

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