Disciplines: Dentists
Hours: 10 Contact Hours
Item#: LD6MI

 

Sign up for the Western Schools 365 Online Membership
Online Access to all our dental CE courses for a full year!

Michigan 10-Hour Dentist Bundle


Reg. Prices
Just $69.95
Item # LD6MI
New
When available, the Online Course format is included with the hard copy, eBook, or audio book formats!

This product includes the following courses:
Click on the title to see more and read the course

Maintaining Dental Implants, Updated 1st Edition

Price: $19.95 
Item # L0834  

Review Date: April 27, 2017

Expiration Date: April 26, 2020

Original Release Date: July 31, 2013

 

The use of implants has been an important treatment in restorative dentistry since the establishment of outcome predictability and recognition of long-term dental implant and restoration success. Additionally, the evolution of this treatment modality has resulted in widespread interest in restorative implant options among both patients and practitioners. The increasing number of patients selecting dental implants as a treatment option presents the dental team with the challenge of maintaining these implant-supported restorations.

This basic-level course, appropriate for dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants, provides an overview of oral hygiene for dental implants, including the identification of similarities and differences in the periodontal structure surrounding a natural tooth versus that surrounding a dental implant. The course discusses the clinical procedures used to evaluate the status of dental implants as healthy, ailing, or failing and the methods employed in professionally cleaning implants and improving home care techniques.

 

AGD Subject Code: 690 

Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Explain oral hygiene for dental implants.
  • Identify similarities and differences in the periodontal structure surrounding a natural tooth versus that of an implant.
  • Explain the clinical procedures for evaluating the status of dental implants and determining healthy, ailing, and failing status.
  • Explain methods for the professional cleaning of implants and improved home care techniques.
Author Bio(s)

 

Gregori M. Kurtzman, DDS, MAGD, DICOI, is in private general practice in Silver Spring, Maryland. He has lectured both nationally and internationally on the topics of restorative dentistry, endodontics, dental implant surgery, and prosthetics and has published numerous journal articles in peerreviewed publications. In addition, Dr. Kurtzman is on the editorial board of numerous publications and is a consultant and clinical evaluator for multiple dental manufacturers. He has earned fellowships in the Academy of General Dentistry, the International Congress of Oral Implantologists, the Pierre Fauchard Academy, and the American College of Dentists, as well as masterships in the Academy of General Dentistry and the Implant Prosthetic Section of the International Congress of Oral Implantologists. He also holds diplomat status in the International Congress of Oral Implantology.

Lee H. Silverstein, DDS, MS, is an associate clinical professor of periodontics at the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta, Georgia. He is the author of Principles of Dental Suturing: A Complete Guide to Surgical Closure and has a private practice in Marietta, Georgia.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Evan B. Rosen, DMD, MPH, is a maxillofacial prosthodontist and part-time lecturer at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine. Dr. Rosen completed his Doctor of Dental Medicine degree at the University of Florida College of Dentistry and his prosthodontics residency at the Eastman Institute for Oral Health in Rochester, New York. He continued his professional training by completing a fellowship in maxillofacial prosthetics at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. Dr. Rosen is actively engaged in research focusing on quality-of-life outcomes and the management of medically complex patients.

Probiotics and the Oral Cavity, Updated 1st Edition

Price: $19.95 
Item # L0760  

Release Date: December 2, 2010

Review Date: July 27, 2016

Expiration Date: July 26, 2019

 

Good mental and physical health depends on strong interpersonal relationships, daily exercise, and a balanced, nutritious diet. Factors adversely affecting health include the increased use of antibiotics and other potent pharmaceutical agents, as well as the effects of professional (work-related) and personal stress. There has been a steady growth of interest in, and awareness of, the beneficial effects of certain microorganisms, typically those derived from fermented milk products, on the health and viability of the GI tract. It is now widely accepted that microorganisms such as L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus support healthy indigenous intestinal flora and may be effective in alleviating a number of digestive and other problems.

One result of this increased awareness has been a greater interest in prebiotics and probiotics. A growing body of work has focused on the benefits of probiotics therapy for the oral cavity and there is mounting evidence that certain probiotic strains may be very beneficial to oral health. The basis of the therapeutic mode is that ingested probiotic bacterial species provide effector bacterial strains that replace pathogens and control bacterial disease. Probiotics for the oral cavity is an exciting area of dental care research and eventually may offer a novel and effective approach to treating or even preventing periodontal disease and denture stomatitis. This basic-level course familiarizes dental professionals with the role of intestinal flora in the human gut, the physiological effects of probiotics in the body, and the specific function of probiotics in the oral cavity.

 

 

AGD Subject Code: 150
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the role of intestinal flora in the body.
  • Describe probiotics and their sources.
  • Explain the physiology of probiotics in the body.
  • Describe the role of probiotics in the oral cavity.
  • Identify commercial probiotic formulations.
Author Bio(s)

 

J. Anthony von Fraunhofer, MSc, PhD, FRSC, is professor emeritus, University of Maryland Dental School, Baltimore, Maryland, where he also served as director of biomaterials research in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. He has written more than 400 scientific papers and 16 books, and contributed chapters to 15 monographs on dental biomaterials and materials science. Dr. von Fraunhofer is the author of the well-regarded monographs Dental Materials at a Glance and Research Writing in Dentistry, published by Wiley-Blackwell. His special interests are the biomechanical properties of materials used in medicine and dentistry, and the degradation, wear, and corrosion of materials in the biosystem.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for 4 years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

Implant-Related Nerve Injuries

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0748  

Release Date: June 7, 2016

Expiration Date: June 6, 2019

 

According to the American Academy of Implant Dentistry there are currently 3 million people in the United States with dental implants, and that number is growing by 500,000 per year. While the success rate of implants has been reported to be 98%, there are still some risks involved. Because of their ability to restore esthetics and function, dental implants have become the preferred option for replacing nonrestorable and missing teeth. Despite high success rates, however, many complications have been encountered with their use.

One of the most serious complications is the alteration of sensation after implant placement in the posterior mandible. The prevalence of this type of a complication has been reported to be as high as 13%. This sensatory change can occur as a result of injury to the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) or the lingual nerve from traumatic local anesthetic injections or during dental implant osteotomy or placement. This complication is one of the most unpleasant experiences for both the patient and the dentist, so every precaution should be taken to avoid it. Once it happens, the dentist should provide the patient with appropriate care and should know when to refer the patient to a microneurosurgeon. Depending on the degree of nerve injury, alteration in sensation varies from mild paresthesia to complete anesthesia. Injuries sustained may be transient, manageable, or, in certain cases, permanent.

This intermediate-level course familiarizes dental professionals with different types of nerve injuries related to implant placement and their causes, and the areas within the oral cavity at increased risk for such injuries. The course discusses how the dental professional can properly plan implant placement to avoid nerve injury and how to treat nerve injuries if they do occur.

AGD Subject Code: 690
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Differentiate among the types of nerve injuries.
  • Explain the mechanisms that cause nerve injury related to implant placement.
  • Identify the anatomical areas that present more risks when placing implants.
  • Recognize the strategies used to avoid nerve injury during implant placement.
  • Explain how to manage implant-related nerve injuries.
Author Bio(s)

 

Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

 

Content Editor

Prescription Drug Abuse Among Dental Patients: Scope, Prevention, and Management Considerations, Updated 1st Edition - 3 Hours

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0743  

Release Date: October 1, 2013

Review Date: June 7, 2016

Expiration Date: June 6, 2019

 

Abuse of prescription drugs has increased so dramatically in the United States that it has been labeled a national epidemic. For dental patients, pain is often an unavoidable sequela to invasive dental procedures and untreated or long-standing oral disease. Balancing the desire to alleviate pain against the suspicion that the patient may be a drug seeker is just one of the issues that confront dental providers. The patient’s past medical, dental, and social history; current history; chief complaint; and history of prescription drug use all contribute to the impression received by the dental provider. How the dental provider manages this information is critical to the result of the visit and subsequent outcome for the patient.

The purpose of this basic-level course is to provide dental providers with an appreciation of the scope of the problem of prescription drug abuse and a realization that the misuse and abuse of these drugs likely take place among the patient populations they serve. By becoming familiar with the pharmacology of the most commonly abused drugs, the risk factors for developing addictive behaviors, and the manner in which these medications are commonly acquired, dental providers will be positioned to curb prescribing practices that contribute to this growing problem and will be better able to serve their patients and their communities as informed prevention advocates. The information provided in this course is applicable to all dental team members, regardless of their practice setting or scope of practice. The information is of interest to dental team members in private practice, academic institutions, military service positions, hospitals, and community health centers.

 

AGD Subject Code: 157

Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

 

 

This course is an extract of, and should not be taken in conjunction with, L0852 - Prescription Drug Abuse Among Dental Patients: Scope, Prevention, and Management Considerations, Updated 1st Edition (2 contact hours).

 

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the history and scope of prescription drug abuse and the role of the dental professional.
  • Define the terminology used in discussing prescription drug abuse.
  • Explain the pharmacology, physiology, and regulatory control of the prescription drugs that are most commonly abused and the extent and impact of their nonmedical use.
  • Describe the populations most at risk for abusing prescription drugs and their access to these drugs.
  • Discuss the tactics and resources available to manage and prevent prescription drug abuse in the dental practice.
Author Bio(s)

Marnie Oakley, DMD, is the associate dean of clinical affairs at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine, from which she received her DMD in 1992. Dr. Oakley served in both active duty and reserve roles as a dental officer in the United States Navy. As an experienced educator, she has taught numerous courses related to clinical dentistry, including Oral Diagnosis and Treatment Planning, Clinical Restorative Dentistry, and the Clinical Responsibility course series. In addition to being a published author and presenter on the subject of prescription drug abuse, Dr. Oakley was responsible for the development and implementation of the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine Comprehensive Care Program. Dr. Oakley also served as Chair of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Annual Session Planning Committee for two consecutive years, for which she received a Presidential Citation. She served in officer positions in several ADEA committees and groups. Dr. Oakley maintains membership in numerous professional organizations including the American Dental Association (ADA), Pennsylvania Dental Association (PDA), Western Pennsylvania Dental Association (WPDA), Omicron Kappa Upsilon, and the Academy of General Dentistry. 

Jean O’Donnell, DMD, MSN, is the associate dean for for academic affairs at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine, from which she received her DMD in 1990. Within the same institution, she is an associate professor in the department of Restorative Dentistry and Comprehensive Care. Dr. O’Donnell holds a bachelor’s degree in nursing from Pennsylvania State University and a master’s degree in nursing from the University of Pittsburgh. She is a graduate of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Leadership Institute and currently serves as one of the university’s liaisons to the ADEA Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education. She is a member of Omicron Kappa Upsilon. Prescription drug abuse and tobacco cessation are among Dr. O’Donnell’s special interests.

Michael A. Zemaitis, PhD, holds a bachelor’s degree in pharmacy and a PhD in pharmacology. He is a professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences in the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy, and he teaches in the professional and graduate programs in the School of Pharmacy and the School of Dental Medicine. Dr. Zemaitis’s current area of research interest is biochemical pharmacology, with a special interest in drug and metabolite analysis in biological fluids. He actively supports several pharmacy-related policy issues, including the establishment of a prescription drug monitoring program in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania designed to reduce drug diversion and abuse, and “Project Life Line,” a program to have community pharmacies provide the narcotic antidote naloxone to high-risk opiate users to prevent overdose deaths.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Wayne McElhiney, DPh, DDS, is a 1966 graduate of the University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy and a 1974 graduate of the University of Tennessee College of Dentistry. He maintained a private practice for 25 years and is currently director of the Wellness Committee of the Tennessee Dental Association. Dr. McElhiney is a member of NAADAC, the Association of Addiction Professionals, and he serves on the Advisory Council of the University of Utah School on Alcoholism and Other Drug Dependencies. In 2012-2013, he served as a consultant for the American Dental Association Counsel on Dental Practice. He serves as a consultant for the Drug Formulating and Pain Regimen for Alive Hospice in Nashville, Tennessee. Dr. McElhiney is a noted lecturer and published author and is currently involved in teaching the disease concept of addiction at the University of Tennessee College of Dentistry, the University of Tennessee College of Dental Hygiene, and Tennessee State University College of Dental Hygiene.

Want more choices?
Want more choices?