Disciplines: Dentists
Hours: 20 Contact Hours
Item#: LDRMA

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Massachusetts 20-Hour Dentist Pack


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Item # LDRMA
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OSHA and CDC Infection Control Standards and Barrier Precautions in the Dental Healthcare Setting, 2nd Edition and Prescription Drug Abuse Among Dental Patients: Scope, Prevention, and Management Considerations fulfill your state requirements.

This product includes the following courses:
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OSHA and CDC Infection Control Standards and Barrier Precautions in the Dental Healthcare Setting, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 Hours:3 Contact Hours
Item # L0733  

Release Date: July 31, 2013

Review Date: April 15, 2016

Expiration Date: April 14, 2019

There are more than one-half million dental healthcare personnel in the United States, a total that includes approximately 195,000 dentists, 200,000 registered dental hygienists, 300,000 dental assistants, and 35,000 dental laboratory technicians. Most dentists are solo practitioners working in outpatient, ambulatory care facilities using instruments that generate spatter, mists, aerosols, or particulate matter. In such settings there is a strong possibility that patients and dental personnel will be exposed to blood and other potentially pathogenic infectious material unless precautions are taken. Fortunately, by understanding certain principles of disease transmission and using infection control practices, dental personnel can prevent disease transmission.

This basic-level course helps to protect both patient and practitioner safety by providing dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants with a review of the CDC recommendations for barrier precautions in the dental healthcare setting and the application of OSHA regulations to infection control. By understanding certain principles of disease transmission and using infection control practices, dental personnel can prevent disease transmission. The course explains universal precautions and describes personal protective equipment. Environmental infection control procedures are identified including general cleaning recommendations cleaning clinical contact surfaces and cleaning housekeeping surfaces. 

AGD Subject Code: 148
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.
 
Arkansas, Delaware, Iowa, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, West Virginia, dental professionals: This course fulfills your infection control requirement.

Dental Management for Pediatric Patients with Complex Needs, Updated 1st Edition

Price: $29.95 Hours:3 Contact Hours
Item # L0702  

Release Date: May 21, 2012
Review Date: May 19, 2015
Expiration Date: May 18, 2018

Pediatric patients with complex medical and developmental conditions are a unique and growing population. Because these children are especially vulnerable to the oral effects of systemic diseases, it is important that all members of the dental team develop foundational knowledge for the care of this patient population. This course presents information on select morbidities that are typical in these children and adolescents, and aids clinicians in developing rational thought processes for gathering information from these patients and their caregivers. Equipped with this information, the dental team can develop appropriate dental treatment plans and continuing care regimens that best serve their pediatric patients with complex medical needs. 

AGD Subject Code: 436

Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

Dental Ethics and the Digital Age - 3-Hour

Price: $29.95 Hours:3 Contact Hours
Item # L0724  

Release Date: January 15, 2016

Expiration Date: January 14, 2019

The Hippocratic Oath provides medical practitioners with a framework for the ethical practice of medicine by professing a set of obligations to which physicians are bound. As is evident from the language of the oath, Hippocrates believed that the practice of medicine was both an art and a privilege and that patients had rights of their own.

Dentistry has adopted many of the ideals of the Hippocratic Oath into its current professional codes of ethics as well as the oaths that dental and hygiene students take upon graduation from dental school. The American Dental Association Principles of Ethics and Codes of Professional Conduct (ADA Code) and the Code of Ethics of the American Dental Hygienist Association (ADHA) are living documents and are revised periodically to address new ethical issues that arise within the profession. The practice of dentistry is multifaceted. Not only must dental professionals have the technical skills to treat patients appropriately and safely, they must also practice within a professional ethical framework that is sometimes more challenging than the dental procedures themselves.

This basic-level course helps dental professionals gain a better understanding of dental ethics, professionalism, and current ethical challenges to the profession, with particular emphasis on the impact of the digital age. Dental ethics have deep roots in history and this course takes an in-depth look at the events that forged the basis of modern day ethics and professionalism in dentistry. Our electronic world is expanding exponentially and advancing technology provides both opportunities and challenges. Dental professionals may be eager to incorporate the latest technologies into their practices and into their private lives, but must consider the ethical implications of doing so. This course explores some of the issues in this new frontier, for example, the rise of cyberbullying and the dentist’s obligation in these cases. Using a systematic, case-based approach, this course provides dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants with the tools to recognize and navigate through the complex ethical issues that may arise in today’s practice.

AGD Subject Code: 555

Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

Fulfills Ethics requirement in the following states: Arizona, Hawaii, Kansas, Minnesota, North Dakota, and Oklahoma.

Prescription Drug Abuse Among Dental Patients: Scope, Prevention, and Management Considerations - 2 Hour

Price: $19.95 Hours:2 Contact Hours
Item # L0340  

Release Date: March 21, 2014 
Expiration Date: March 20, 2017 


This basic-level course provides dental providers with an appreciation of the increasing scope of prescription drug abuse in the United States and a recognition that this problem, which crosses boundaries of gender, age, race, and socioeconomic status, is likely to exist within the patient populations they serve. 

Dental providers frequently prescribe medications for their patients, especially for the control of pain. Although prescription drugs carry an aura of acceptability because they are legal and prescribed by professionals, the potential repercussions from using these drugs for reasons other than their intended purpose often go unrecognized by the user and unaddressed by the prescriber. 

By becoming familiar with the basic pharmacology of the most commonly abused drugs, the risk factors for developing addictive behaviors, and the manner in which these medications are commonly acquired, dental providers will be able to curb prescribing practices that contribute to this growing problem and better serve their patients and their communities as informed prevention advocates.

AGD Subject Code: 157

This course is an extraction of, and should not be taken in conjunction with, the 3-hour course of the same title.

Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

Osteoporosis: Implications for the Oral Healthcare Provider, Updated 1st Edition

Price: $19.95 Hours:2 Contact Hours
Item # L0708  

Release Date: June 29, 2012
Revised Date: June 26, 2015
Expiration Date: June 25, 2018

Both periodontal disease and osteoporosis are serious public-health concerns in the United States. There is evidence that osteoporosis, and the characteristic loss of bone mass, is associated with periodontal disease and tooth loss. To optimize the oral health care of patients with osteoporosis and at risk for the condition, dentists and other members of the dental team should be aware of the clinical (and possibly pathophysiologic) link between these increasingly common conditions. 

This intermediate-level course addresses current concepts regarding links between oral health and osteoporosis, discusses the impact on oral health of pharmacotherapies used in the treatment of osteoporosis, and outlines steps to mitigate the impact on oral health of common drug treatments used to treat osteoporosis. Oral healthcare providers must recognize the oral health implications of common therapeutic options for osteoporosis, especially use of bisphosphonates and antiresorptive medications. In particular, patient exposure to bisphosphonate and antiresorptive drugs has led to increasing reports of osteonecrosis of the jaw. This serious and debilitating condition requires dental practitioners to be alert for signs and symptoms of this syndrome and to take steps to mitigate risk factors. Although the pharmacotherapy used to treat osteoporosis causes concerns for oral health providers, these drugs provide very significant healthcare advantages for the patients, and overall the reduction in osteoporotic fractures alone causes significant savings for the healthcare system. Therefore, care must be taken not to overestimate the oral health ramifications and concerns with these drugs.  


AGD Subject Code: 730

Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

Oral Health Issues for the Female Patient, Updated 1st Edition

Price: $19.95 Hours:2 Contact Hours
Item # L0707  

Release Date: June 29, 2012
Revised Date: June 26, 2015
Expiration Date: June 25, 2018

Oral health encompasses the craniofacial complex and includes the teeth, periodontium, mucosa, gingiva, oral pharynx, temporomandibular joints, and muscles used for mastication. While men and women face many common oral health issues, it is no longer acceptable to consider oral health to be gender neutral. Indeed, women differ from men in their oral health needs and concerns. This basic-level course explores the variables affecting women’s oral health and discusses the issues and concerns that dental professionals face in providing care to females across their lifespan.


AGD Subject Code: 750

Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

Dental Implants: Complications and Peri-Implant Diseases, Updated 1st Edition

Price: $19.95 Hours:2 Contact Hours
Item # L0706  

Release Date: June 29, 2012
Revised Date: June 26, 2015
Expiration Date: June 25, 2018

Dental implants are an established treatment modality in dentistry with a high rate of success and few complications. However, untoward events do occur despite careful treatment planning and meticulous execution of clinical procedures. Surgical complications that can occur include infection, bleeding, wound dehiscence, primary instability of the implant, neurosensory changes, and tissue emphysema. Once the implant is osseointegrated, other complications may arise, including inflammatory peri-implant lesions. Such situations may be limited to inflammation of the peri-implant mucosa or more significantly involve the supporting bone. All these conditions increase the risk of poor outcomes, including implant loss. This intermediate-level course addresses complications associated with dental implants and reviews selective options for their management.


AGD Subject Code: 690

Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

Three Drug Classes Every Dentist Should Know: Antibiotics, Analgesics, and Local Anesthetics - Module II: Analgesics

Price: $9.95 Hours:1 Contact Hour
Item # L0714  

Release Date: September 14, 2015

Expiration Date: September 13, 2018

Oral healthcare professionals (OHCPs) are routinely involved with the selection and prescription of analgesics to address orofacial pain. Pain has both physiological and psychological components, and an experience of poorly managed pain related to dentistry can lead patients to avoid or postpone treatment, making these patients more difficult to treat and less likely to comply with prescribed regimens.  Oral medications administered postoperatively that reduce pain improve clinical outcomes, making them an integral part of dental practice.  Analgesic medications in dentistry are indicated for the relief of acute pain, postoperative pain, and chronic pain, and for controlling adjunctive intraoperative pain (pain not associated with the dental procedure).  In addition, these medications can be given preoperatively (preemptively) to mitigate both postoperative pain and postoperative pain medication requirements.  Overprescription practices and inappropriate prescribing in certain medical and dental pain situations has fueled the growing tragedy of prescription drug abuse.  Most states have created prescription drug monitoring programs, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) continue to closely monitor prescribing practices while tightening regulations around the prescribing of pain medications.

This intermediate-level course reviews the pharmacology of analgesic agents and updates the participant on current guidelines and therapeutic choices in order to optimize analgesic prescribing practices.  It also discusses the differences among analgesics typically prescribed for orofacial pain.  Along with this, the course also addresses the selection and timing of appropriate medications for special populations including the pregnant and breast-feeding patient, and patients with significant allergy histories.  Since the goal of analgesic therapy is to assure selection of the right drug at the right time and at the right dose, for the right patient and the right procedure, this course presents information that should be considered essential for all OHCPs, both seasoned and newly credentialed. 

AGD Subject Code: 344

Western Schools designates this activity for 1 continuing education credit.

This course is an extraction of, and should not be taken in conjunction with, Three Drug Classes Every Dental Professional Should Know: Antibiotics, Analgesics, and Anesthetics (L0726)

Three Drug Classes Every Dentist Should Know: Antibiotics, Analgesics, and Local Anesthetics - Module I: Antibiotics

Price: $9.95 Hours:1 Contact Hour
Item # L0713  

Release Date: September 4, 2015 

Expiration Date: September 3, 2018 

Oral healthcare professionals (OHCPs) are routinely involved with the selection and prescription of antibiotics to either prevent an infection prophylactically or to manage an existing orofacial infection therapeutically. In fact, there are only three major uses of antimicrobial agents in the practice of dentistry: prophylaxis in patients with compromised immune systems caused by certain diseases or medications; prophylaxis in patients at risk for developing infective endocarditis; and treatment of an acute dental infection.  Although OHCPs must stay current with the published guidelines that represent existing standards of care, the evidence in support of these recommendations can be controversial. Regardless of these issues, the appropriate prescribing of antibiotics, while challenging for both dental and medical professionals alike, is vitally important in the overall management of patients.  The practice of overprescribing antibiotics in certain medical and dental situations as well as development of antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria could be greatly abated with closer attention to basic prescription-writing principles. 

This intermediate-level course reviews the pharmacology of antimicrobial agents and presents current guidelines and therapeutic choices in order to optimize antibiotic prescribing practices.  It also discusses the differences among antibiotics typically prescribed for orofacial infections.  The course also explains the appropriate selection of antimicrobial therapy for the pregnant and breastfeeding patient as well as patients with significant allergy histories.  Because the goal of antibiotic therapy is to ensure selection of the right drug at the right time and at the right dose, for the right patient and the right procedure, the information in this course should be considered essential knowledge for all OHCPs, those just starting their career and those needing a mid-career refresher.

AGD Subject Code: 344

Western Schools designates this activity for 1 continuing education credit.

This course is an extraction of, and should not be taken in conjunction with, Three Drug Classes Every Dental Professional Should Know: Antibiotics, Analgesics, and Anesthetics (L0726)

This course shares overlapping content with, and should not be taken in conjunction with, Premedication for Dental Procedures (L0778).


Methamphetamine Abuse: An Update for Dental Professionals

Price: $9.95 Hours:1 Contact Hour
Item # L0717  

Release Date: January 15, 2016

Expiration Date: January 14, 2019

Methamphetamine is the most widely manufactured amphetamine-type stimulant and is a powerful central nervous stimulant which is highly addictive. The abuse of methamphetamine has markedly increased in the past decade, and while prescription drug abuse is the nation’s fastest-growing drug problem, research suggests that methamphetamine is the fastest growing illegal drug problem in North America.  In many parts of North America and Hawaii, methamphetamine use is at epidemic proportions. Methamphetamine is classified as a psychostimulant and is structurally similar to drugs such as cocaine and amphetamine. However, unlike cocaine and amphetamine, methamphetamine has a much longer duration of action and is significantly more neurotoxic. The neurotoxicity of methamphetamine is profound and persists long after its use has been discontinued.  The use of methamphetamine has devastating effects on the oral cavity. Dental healthcare workers are often the first medical professionals to recognize the signs and symptoms of methamphetamine abuse because patients seek help to manage the resulting dental destruction.  With this reality comes responsibility.  Dental healthcare workers need to be familiar with the effects of methamphetamine use on the oral cavity and how to recognize this type of dental destruction.  The information provided in this course is useful to all dental team members, regardless of practice setting or scope of practice.  Designed for dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants, this basic-level course reviews the pharmacology of methamphetamine and updates the participant on the scope of the current problem of methamphetamine abuse. By becoming familiar with the clinical effects of methamphetamine on the brain, the common psychological and physical symptoms, especially in the oral cavity, and the potential dental treatment modalities available, the dental healthcare worker will be better prepared to recognize and manage patients within their practice who are affected by methamphetamine abuse. Although dental professionals focus on treating the oral cavity, this course serves as a reminder of the oral-systemic link and the fact that dental healthcare professionals can make a significant overall difference in their patients’ lives.

AGD Subject Code: 157

Western Schools designates this activity for 1 continuing education credit. 

 

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