Disciplines: Dental Hygienist
Hours: 7 Contact Hours
Item#: LHTIN

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Indiana 7-Hour Dental Hygienist Bundle


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Item # LHTIN
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This product includes the following courses:
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Prescription Drug Abuse Among Dental Patients: Scope, Prevention, and Management Considerations, Updated 1st Edition - 3 Hours

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0743  

Release Date: October 1, 2013

Review Date: June 7, 2016

Expiration Date: June 6, 2019

 

Abuse of prescription drugs has increased so dramatically in the United States that it has been labeled a national epidemic. For dental patients, pain is often an unavoidable sequela to invasive dental procedures and untreated or long-standing oral disease. Balancing the desire to alleviate pain against the suspicion that the patient may be a drug seeker is just one of the issues that confront dental providers. The patient’s past medical, dental, and social history; current history; chief complaint; and history of prescription drug use all contribute to the impression received by the dental provider. How the dental provider manages this information is critical to the result of the visit and subsequent outcome for the patient.

The purpose of this basic-level course is to provide dental providers with an appreciation of the scope of the problem of prescription drug abuse and a realization that the misuse and abuse of these drugs likely take place among the patient populations they serve. By becoming familiar with the pharmacology of the most commonly abused drugs, the risk factors for developing addictive behaviors, and the manner in which these medications are commonly acquired, dental providers will be positioned to curb prescribing practices that contribute to this growing problem and will be better able to serve their patients and their communities as informed prevention advocates. The information provided in this course is applicable to all dental team members, regardless of their practice setting or scope of practice. The information is of interest to dental team members in private practice, academic institutions, military service positions, hospitals, and community health centers.

 

AGD Subject Code: 157

Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

 

 

This course is an extract of, and should not be taken in conjunction with, L0852 - Prescription Drug Abuse Among Dental Patients: Scope, Prevention, and Management Considerations, Updated 1st Edition (2 contact hours).

 

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the history and scope of prescription drug abuse and the role of the dental professional.
  • Define the terminology used in discussing prescription drug abuse.
  • Explain the pharmacology, physiology, and regulatory control of the prescription drugs that are most commonly abused and the extent and impact of their nonmedical use.
  • Describe the populations most at risk for abusing prescription drugs and their access to these drugs.
  • Discuss the tactics and resources available to manage and prevent prescription drug abuse in the dental practice.
Author Bio(s)

Marnie Oakley, DMD, is the associate dean of clinical affairs at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine, from which she received her DMD in 1992. Dr. Oakley served in both active duty and reserve roles as a dental officer in the United States Navy. As an experienced educator, she has taught numerous courses related to clinical dentistry, including Oral Diagnosis and Treatment Planning, Clinical Restorative Dentistry, and the Clinical Responsibility course series. In addition to being a published author and presenter on the subject of prescription drug abuse, Dr. Oakley was responsible for the development and implementation of the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine Comprehensive Care Program. Dr. Oakley also served as Chair of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Annual Session Planning Committee for two consecutive years, for which she received a Presidential Citation. She served in officer positions in several ADEA committees and groups. Dr. Oakley maintains membership in numerous professional organizations including the American Dental Association (ADA), Pennsylvania Dental Association (PDA), Western Pennsylvania Dental Association (WPDA), Omicron Kappa Upsilon, and the Academy of General Dentistry. 

Jean O’Donnell, DMD, MSN, is the associate dean for for academic affairs at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine, from which she received her DMD in 1990. Within the same institution, she is an associate professor in the department of Restorative Dentistry and Comprehensive Care. Dr. O’Donnell holds a bachelor’s degree in nursing from Pennsylvania State University and a master’s degree in nursing from the University of Pittsburgh. She is a graduate of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Leadership Institute and currently serves as one of the university’s liaisons to the ADEA Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education. She is a member of Omicron Kappa Upsilon. Prescription drug abuse and tobacco cessation are among Dr. O’Donnell’s special interests.

Michael A. Zemaitis, PhD, holds a bachelor’s degree in pharmacy and a PhD in pharmacology. He is a professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences in the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy, and he teaches in the professional and graduate programs in the School of Pharmacy and the School of Dental Medicine. Dr. Zemaitis’s current area of research interest is biochemical pharmacology, with a special interest in drug and metabolite analysis in biological fluids. He actively supports several pharmacy-related policy issues, including the establishment of a prescription drug monitoring program in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania designed to reduce drug diversion and abuse, and “Project Life Line,” a program to have community pharmacies provide the narcotic antidote naloxone to high-risk opiate users to prevent overdose deaths.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Wayne McElhiney, DPh, DDS, is a 1966 graduate of the University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy and a 1974 graduate of the University of Tennessee College of Dentistry. He maintained a private practice for 25 years and is currently director of the Wellness Committee of the Tennessee Dental Association. Dr. McElhiney is a member of NAADAC, the Association of Addiction Professionals, and he serves on the Advisory Council of the University of Utah School on Alcoholism and Other Drug Dependencies. In 2012-2013, he served as a consultant for the American Dental Association Counsel on Dental Practice. He serves as a consultant for the Drug Formulating and Pain Regimen for Alive Hospice in Nashville, Tennessee. Dr. McElhiney is a noted lecturer and published author and is currently involved in teaching the disease concept of addiction at the University of Tennessee College of Dentistry, the University of Tennessee College of Dental Hygiene, and Tennessee State University College of Dental Hygiene.

Dental Erosion: Causes and Preventative Practices, 2nd Edition

Price: $19.95 
Item # L0781  

Release Date: July 30, 2013

Review Date: September 19, 2016

Expiration Date: September 18, 2019

Dental erosion is a progressive loss of dental hard tissue caused by chemical processes without involvement of bacteria. This enamel dissolution is an irreversible process not directly associated with mechanical or traumatic factors, which distinguishes it from other types of wear, such as attrition (loss of tooth structure due to clenching or grinding), abrasion (mechanical loss of tooth structure caused by a foreign element), or abfraction (loss of tooth structure at the gumline due to occlusal forces). The clinical features of dental erosion appear as well-defined, wedge-shaped areas facially and cervically. The occurrence of enamel erosion lesions is associated primarily with intrinsic and extrinsic acids.

The rise in consumption of soft drinks, including sports drinks, has been linked to increases in the rates of dental erosion. The additives to these drinks, not the beverage pH per se, appear to be the causative factors contributing to enamel dissolution. Furthermore, fruit-flavored drinks and unsweetened juices appear to have the same erosive potential as carbonated drinks.

This basic-level course provides dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants with guidelines for recognizing and diagnosing dental erosion and offers suggestions for preventive interventions, including record-keeping, nutritional counseling, fluoride use, and home-care procedures. The course also discusses recommended restorative treatment options.

 

 

AGD Subject Code: 741

 
Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Recognize dental erosion and its causes.
  • Describe preventive interventions and restorative treatment options.
Author Bio(s)

 

Marion C. Manski, RDH, MS, has practiced clinical dental hygiene for more than 30 years. She is a graduate of the Forsyth School for Dental Hygienists, the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, and most recently the University of Maryland, Baltimore, where she earned her master’s degree. Ms. Manski is an associate professor in and the director of the Dental Hygiene Program, University of Maryland School of Dentistry. She provides clinical and didactic instruction to junior and senior dental hygiene students. Ms. Manski is also in private practice. Her research interests include nutrition, dental caries, and caries prevention.

J. Anthony von Fraunhofer, MSc, PhD, FADM, FRSC, is professor emeritus, University of Maryland Dental School, Baltimore, Maryland, where he also served as director of biomaterials research in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. He has written more than 400 scientific papers and 16 books, and contributed chapters to 15 monographs on dental biomaterials and materials science. Dr. von Fraunhofer is the author of the well-regarded monographs Dental Materials at a Glance and Research Writing in Dentistry, published by Wiley-Blackwell. His special interests are the biomechanical properties of materials used in medicine and dentistry, and the degradation, wear, and corrosion of materials in the biosystem.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

Indiana Law and Ethics for Dental Professionals, 3rd Edition

Price: $19.95 
Item # L0751  

Release Date: August 22, 2013

Review Date: June 30, 2016

Expiration Date: June 29, 2019

 

This course describes the difference between ethics and jurisprudence and discusses the ethical principles outlined by the ADA and the Indiana State Board of Dentistry. OSHA regulations for dental offices and the CDC recommendations for infection control in dentistry are discussed, including the most frequent OSHA violations committed within the dental setting. The latest changes in the Indiana Dental Practice Act are included in this updated state-required course.

 

This course meets the two-hour ethics professional responsibility and Indiana Statutes and Administrative Rules continuing education requirement for license renewal purposes for dentists and dental hygienists.

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Differentiate between the terms ethics and jurisprudence.
  • Discuss the specific use of the five principles that guide the American Dental Association (ADA) Code of Professional Conduct.
  • Explain how the laws of Indiana and the ADA Code of Professional Conduct apply to dentists and dental hygienists.
  • Discuss the OSHA regulations that apply to dental offices and those that are most frequently violated.
  • Describe the recommendations for infection control in dentistry of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
  • Discuss the Bloodborne Pathogens Standard and its updates, as well as the Hazard Communication Standard.
  • List updates to the Indiana Dental Practice Act.
Author Bio(s)

 

Christine Wisnom, RN, BSN, is a nurse educator for the AIDS Education and Training Center in the Department of Oncology and Diagnostic Sciences at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry. She is a graduate of the University of Maryland School of Nursing. Her primary areas of interest are infectious diseases and infection control, and she lectures locally, nationally, and internationally on these topics. Ms. Wisnom has served as both a member and as the chair of the Infection Control/Biosafety Committee at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry for many years. She has published numerous articles and abstracts in medical and dental journals and has coordinated multiple research projects.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Lawrence P. Garetto, MS, PhD, is professor of oral pathology, radiology, and medicine at Indiana University School of Dentistry (IUSD). He received his PhD from the Boston University School of Medicine and completed a fellowship in Clinical Ethics at the Charles Warren Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics. He was the founding Chair of the IUSD Professional Conduct Committee and served as advisor to the Student Professional Conduct Committee, a peer review group in the School of Dentistry throughout its existence. He currently serves as the advisor to IUSD’s Student Professionalism and Ethics Association. He is past-president of the American Society for Dental Ethics and represented the Society as the ethics liaison to the Board of Regents of the American College of Dentists. Dr. Garetto’s scholarly work centers on the early development of critical thinking/clinical reasoning skills and on the development of professional and clinical ethics.

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