Disciplines: Dental Hygienist
Hours: 18 Contact Hours
Item#: LH1IL

 

Sign up for the Western Schools 365 Online Membership
Online Access to all our dental CE courses for a full year!

Illinois 18-Hour Dental Hygienist Bundle


Reg. Prices $179.55
Just $125.95
Item # LH1IL
New
When available, the Online Course format is included with the hard copy, eBook, or audio book formats!

This product includes the following courses:
Click on the title to see more and read the course

Caries Management by Risk Assessment: CAMBRA in Dental Practice, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0889  

Review Date: August 3, 2018

Expiration Date: August 3, 2021

Original Release Date: July 5, 2011

This basic-level course provides a comprehensive overview of the evolution of caries management and applies the concepts of CAMBRA. This course will help dental practitioners become better equipped to halt the progression of caries with as little hard tissue damage as possible, thereby benefiting their patients. And the learner will be introduced to different protocols in order to treat caries using the medical model.

 

AGD Subject Code: 250

Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Discuss the evolution of caries management and the philosophies of minimal intervention dentistry, minimally invasive dentistry, and caries management by risk assessment in the practice of dentistry.
  • Discuss the factors affecting caries risk.
  • Explain the importance of saliva testing.
  • Identify different protocols to treat caries using the medical model.
  • Discuss the risks, alternatives, and benefits of using glass ionomers as dental sealants.
Author Bio(s)

Amy Nieves, RDH, graduated from Middlesex County College in Edison, New Jersey, in 1999 and launched www.amyrdh.com to serve as an online resource for dental hygiene students, clinical hygien-ists, educators, and other dental professionals. From 2000 to 2007, Ms. Nieves was a regular con-tributor to the peer-reviewed journal Contemporary Oral Hygiene with her monthly column, “Hygiene Solutions.” Her articles have appeared in various dental hygiene publications. In 2004, she co-authored The Purple Guide: Developing Your Clinical Dental Hygiene Career with Shirley Gutkowski, RDH, BSDH. Ms. Nieves was the southern Michigan specialist for GC America, Inc., from 2007 to 2010 and has also been the eastern Pennsylvania clinical specialist for OralDNA.

Elena Francisco, RDH, RDHAP, MSDH, received her bachelor of science degree in dental hygiene from Loma Linda University and her master’s degree in dental hygiene education from Idaho State University. She is currently an adjunct clinical instructor in dental hygiene at Carrington College in Sacramento, California. Prior to joining the faculty at Carrington College, Ms. Francisco was a clini­cal instructor in dental hygiene at the University of the Pacific Arthur Dugoni School of Dentistry. A licensed registered dental hygienist in alternative practice, Ms. Francisco has co-authored several journal articles on dental hygienists’ knowledge, attitudes, and practice behaviors regarding caries risk assessment and management.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Douglas A. Young, DDS, EdD, MS, MBA, is a Professor at the University of the Pacific where he is an active and ardent educator in the field of minimally invasive dentistry and cariology. He was one of the founders of the CAMBRA (caries management by risk assessment) Coalition, American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Cariology Section, and the American Academy of Cariology (AAC). Dr. Young served on the ADA Council of Scientific Affairs (2012 to 2016) and is currently a member of the ADA Evidence-based Dentistry (EBD) Leaders network and a cariology consultant for the ADA. Dr. Young has presented at congresses and universities around the world. Dr. Young has been published in numerous peer-reviewed dental journals and textbooks focusing on minimally invasive dentistry, silver fluoride, glass ionomer, and CAMBRA.

Dental Ethics and the Digital Age: 3 Hour, Updated 1st Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0948  

Review Date: August 7, 2018

Expiration Date: August 7, 2021

Original Release Date: January 28, 2016

The practice of dentistry is multifaceted. Not only must dental professionals have the technical skills to treat patients appropriately and safely, they must also practice within a professional ethical framework that is sometimes more challenging than the dental procedures themselves. This basic-level course helps dental professionals gain a better understanding of dental ethics, professionalism, and current ethical challenges to the profession, with particular emphasis on the impact of the digital age. Dental professionals may be eager to incorporate the latest technologies into their practices and into their private lives, but must consider the ethical implications of doing so.

 

AGD Subject Code:  555

Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

This course should not be taken in conjunction with L0900 - Dental Ethics and the Digital Age: 2 Hour, Updated 1st Edition.

Fulfills Ethics requirement in the following states: Arizona, Hawaii, Kansas, Minnesota, North Dakota, and Oklahoma.

This course is the updated version of course L0724 - Dental Ethics and the Digital Age: 3 Hour

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the evolution of healthcare ethics, including events that affected development of the principles of ethics that guide the dental profession.
  • Describe how codes of ethics and concepts of professionalism guide the dental practitioner’s
    relationships and obligations.
  • Discuss the relationship of ethics to legal obligations.
  • Identify current and emerging ethical challenges facing dental professionals.
  • Describe how ethical decision making models help dental professionals recognize and address
    ethical dilemmas in practice.
Author Bio(s)

Toni M. Roucka, RN, DDS, MA, is an associate professor and associate dean for academic affairs at Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine in Alton, Illinois. She is a Fellow of the American College of Dentists and current president of the American Society for Dental Ethics, a special section of the American College of Dentists. Dr. Roucka obtained her DDS degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry and master’s degree in population health – bioethics from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Roucka is a nationally recognized speaker and has written extensively on the subject of ethics in dentistry. She currently writes a regular ethics column for General Dentistry, the journal of the Academy of General Dentistry.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Odette Aguirre, DDS, MS, MPH, is Assistant Clinical Professor in the Department of Biomedical and Applied Sciences at Indiana University School of Dentistry in Indianapolis, Indiana, and Affiliate Faculty at the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies at Indiana University, in Bloomington, Indiana. She has recently been nominated as a Fellow of the American College of Dentists and serves as a Member-at-Large of the American Society for Dental Ethics, a special section of the American College of Dentists. Dr. Aguirre obtained her DDS degree from Universidad Francisco MarroquĂ­n in Guatemala City, where she grew up. After graduation, she completed a General Practice Residency at Eastman Dental Center in Rochester, NY, where she also obtained an MS from the University of Rochester. She obtained a bioethics degree from Indiana University’s Department of Philosophy and an MPH from the Fairbanks School of Public Health. At IUSD, she is Director of the “Ethics and Professionalism” courses for first and second year dental students, and co-leads ethics rounds and a clinical ethics consultation service for third and fourth year dental students. Dr. Aguirre is IUSD’s Director of Interprofessional Ethics Seminars, a series of workshops with various healthcare professionals and students, meant to foster collaborative ethics discussions. She is Associate Producer of a series of ethical dilemma videos in a collaboration between IUSD and the American College of Dentists.

Maintaining Dental Implants, Updated 1st Edition

Price: $19.95 
Item # L0834  

Review Date: April 27, 2017

Expiration Date: April 26, 2020

Original Release Date: July 31, 2013

 

The use of implants has been an important treatment in restorative dentistry since the establishment of outcome predictability and recognition of long-term dental implant and restoration success. Additionally, the evolution of this treatment modality has resulted in widespread interest in restorative implant options among both patients and practitioners. The increasing number of patients selecting dental implants as a treatment option presents the dental team with the challenge of maintaining these implant-supported restorations.

This basic-level course, appropriate for dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants, provides an overview of oral hygiene for dental implants, including the identification of similarities and differences in the periodontal structure surrounding a natural tooth versus that surrounding a dental implant. The course discusses the clinical procedures used to evaluate the status of dental implants as healthy, ailing, or failing and the methods employed in professionally cleaning implants and improving home care techniques.

 

AGD Subject Code: 690 

Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Explain oral hygiene for dental implants.
  • Identify similarities and differences in the periodontal structure surrounding a natural tooth versus that of an implant.
  • Explain the clinical procedures for evaluating the status of dental implants and determining healthy, ailing, and failing status.
  • Explain methods for the professional cleaning of implants and improved home care techniques.
Author Bio(s)

 

Gregori M. Kurtzman, DDS, MAGD, DICOI, is in private general practice in Silver Spring, Maryland. He has lectured both nationally and internationally on the topics of restorative dentistry, endodontics, dental implant surgery, and prosthetics and has published numerous journal articles in peerreviewed publications. In addition, Dr. Kurtzman is on the editorial board of numerous publications and is a consultant and clinical evaluator for multiple dental manufacturers. He has earned fellowships in the Academy of General Dentistry, the International Congress of Oral Implantologists, the Pierre Fauchard Academy, and the American College of Dentists, as well as masterships in the Academy of General Dentistry and the Implant Prosthetic Section of the International Congress of Oral Implantologists. He also holds diplomat status in the International Congress of Oral Implantology.

Lee H. Silverstein, DDS, MS, is an associate clinical professor of periodontics at the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta, Georgia. He is the author of Principles of Dental Suturing: A Complete Guide to Surgical Closure and has a private practice in Marietta, Georgia.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Evan B. Rosen, DMD, MPH, is a maxillofacial prosthodontist and part-time lecturer at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine. Dr. Rosen completed his Doctor of Dental Medicine degree at the University of Florida College of Dentistry and his prosthodontics residency at the Eastman Institute for Oral Health in Rochester, New York. He continued his professional training by completing a fellowship in maxillofacial prosthetics at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. Dr. Rosen is actively engaged in research focusing on quality-of-life outcomes and the management of medically complex patients.

Lasers in Dentistry: From Fundamentals to Clinical Procedures, 2nd Edition

Price: $19.95 
Item # L0884  

Review Date: January 10, 2018

Expiration Date: January 9, 2021

Original Release Date: January 13, 2012

This is a basic laser operations course for every member of the dental team. This course provides outlines for safety regulations, discusses varying laser instruments, and the unique effects of laser energy on oral tissue. It also compares benefits and drawbacks of laser use. Several different clinical procedures are included with raw photo documentation. Every laser device is especially designed for a unique dental condition. A practicing clinician must understand each these devices and their power to interact with their target tissues. Whether the laser is removing decay, reshaping the gingiva, removing lesions or used in a whitening procedure, the same underlying principle of laser use apply. In this course, the fundamental principle taught is that the least amount of energy or power should be used to reach the specific treatment outcome.

 

AGD Subject Code: 752

Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Discuss the evolving use of lasers in the field of dentistry and their fundamental components.
  • Explain how lasers interact with oral tissues.
  • Describe the lasers currently available for use in dentistry and their specific clinical applications.
  • Identify recommended laser safety protocols.
  • Recognize the benefits and drawbacks of using lasers in dentistry.
  • Discuss the use of lasers in various dental specialties.
Author Bio(s)

Donald J. Coluzzi, DDS, is a health science clinical professor in the Department of Preventive and Restorative Dental Sciences at the University of California, San Francisco, School of Dentistry. Dr. Coluzzi received his DDS from the University of Southern California School of Dentistry in 1970 and was in general practice for more than 35 years. He is a charter member and past president of the Academy of Laser Dentistry (ALD), a former editor-in-chief of the Journal of Laser Dentistry, a Fellow of the American College of Dentists, and a Master of the Academy of Laser Dentistry. The ALD presented him with the 1999 Leon Goldman Award for Clinical Excellence and the 2006 Distinguished Service Award. Dr. Coluzzi has used dental lasers since early 1991 and has earned Advanced Proficiency in Nd:YAG and Er:YAG wavelengths. He has presented around the world on the subject of lasers, co-authored three books, contributed textbook chapters, and published several peer-reviewed articles.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Jeanette Miranda, RDH, BSDH, received her associate’s degree in dental hygiene from Indiana University at South Bend (IUSB) and her bachelor’s degree in dental hygiene from Minnesota State University, Mankato. She has practiced dental hygiene for more than 35 years in four states and was a clinical hygiene instructor at IUSB. She has attained Standard Proficiency and Fellowship status in the diode laser with the World Clinical Laser Institute, as well as Standard Proficiency, Advanced Proficiency, and Mastership status with the Academy of Laser Dentistry. Currently, Jeanette is employed as a clinical hygienist and serves the Academy of Laser Dentistry as co-chair of the Communication Committee and chair of the Auxiliary Committee. She is a past-president of the South Dakota Dental Hygienists’ Association and lectures on dental lasers. 

Dental Radiography: Understanding Radiation Exposure and Safety, 2nd Edition

Price: $19.95 
Item # L0788  

Release Date: July 30, 2013

Review Date: October 11, 2016

Expiration Date: October 10, 2019

 

It is important for a clinician to take dental radiographs based on patient need, and not simply based on routine. Clinicians who take radiographs based on need are providing total quality of care to their dental patients. The decision to order radiographs should be based on several factors, including the patient’s age, dental health, and diet.

This basic-level course outlines the risks and effects of radiation, as well as procedures to reduce radiation exposure to the dental patient. The course provides current research to aid dental practitioners in properly educating their patients about the level of radiation received through dental radiographs. Traditional radiographic film is discussed, along with position-indicating devices, types of cones, and the parallel and bisecting angulation techniques. The advantages and disadvantages of direct and indirect digital radiography are presented. The course outlines current radiation procedures and guidelines that the entire dental team can discuss and review to determine where improvements may be made to the radiation safety procedures currently in use in their dental practice.

 

 

AGD Subject Code: 165
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the sources and forms of radiation – including ionizing radiation – and radiation safety, risks, effects, and exposure reduction.
  • Identify ways to reduce dental radiation dose to the patient.
  • Describe the equipment used for dental radiography, including film, position-indicating devices (film holders), and types of cones.
  • Describe techniques for angulation including the paralleling and bisecting techniques.
  • Describe the types, advantages, and disadvantages of digital radiography.
  • Outline the proper guidelines when preparing a patient for dental radiography.
Author Bio(s)

 

Sharon Crowe, RDH, BSDH, MS, graduated from Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, with a bachelor of science degree in dental hygiene, and completed a master of science degree at Silver Lake College in Manitowoc, Wisconsin. Ms. Crowe was a practicing dental hygienist for more than 25 years. For more than a decade, she worked developing curriculum and teaching in the dental hygienist program at Fox Valley Technical College in Appleton, Wisconsin, before accepting a teaching and curriculum development position at Nicolet College in Rhinelander, Wisconsin. She also works as an administrator for a family health center in Rhinelander. Ms. Crowe has published several continuing education courses in the dental field.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Toni M. Roucka, RN, DDS, MA, is an associate professor of restorative dentistry at Southern Illinois University, School of Dental Medicine, Edwardsville. She maintains an active nursing license and is a Fellow of the American College of Dentists and immediate past president of the American Society for Dental Ethics. Dr. Roucka obtained her DDS degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry and master’s degree in population health – bioethics from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Roucka is a nationally recognized speaker on the subject of ethics in dentistry and has taught restorative dentistry at both Marquette University and the Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine. As a volunteer, she has provided dental care to underserved populations in Guatemala, Venezuela, the Dominican Republic, and Tanzania.

Preventing Pit and Fissure Caries With Sealants, 2nd Edition

Price: $19.95 
Item # L0773  

Release Date: July 31, 2013

Review Date: August 15, 2016

Expiration Date: August 14, 2019

 

The connection between pits and fissures and dental caries has long been recognized, but the diagnosis of carious pits and fissures can often be daunting. Even with newer technologies for caries diagnosis, it is still difficult to chart the progression of the disease since microscopic examination of this type of caries yields considerable variation. Recent research has attempted to evaluate differences in caries detection, conditioning, retention, demineralization/remineralization, shear bond strength, and microleakage, as well as caries progression after the placement of pit and fissure sealants. Further understanding of the pathophysiology of tooth decay, advances in materials, and the importance of proper technique will encourage dentists to more fully incorporate the use of pit and fissure sealants into clinical practice.

This basic-level course provides dental professionals with the tools to identify the need for sealants and the type of sealant that is best for the patient and the dentition. The course reviews the pathophysiology of tooth decay, the role of sealants in preventing pit and fissure caries, and the different types of sealants in clinical use. The course focuses attention on the ADA’s clinical recommendations and presents the proper clinical steps to take in treating pit and fissure caries, from assessing the need for sealants to applying them.

 

 

 

AGD Subject Code: 017

 
Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Explain the pathophysiology of tooth decay and the role of sealants in preventing pit and fissure caries.
  • Outline approaches for identifying the dentition surfaces that need to be sealed.
  • List the types of sealants available and the challenges of sealant retention.
  • Identify the clinical techniques used for different types of sealants.
Author Bio(s)

 

Howard E. Strassler, DMD, FADM, FAGD, is professor and director of operative dentistry at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry in the Department of Endodontics, Prosthodontics and Operative Dentistry. He has lectured nationally and internationally on techniques and selection of dental materials in clinical use and aesthetic restorative dentistry. He is a Fellow in the Academy of Dental Materials and the Academy of General Dentistry, as well as a member of the American Dental Association, the Academy of Operative Dentistry, and the International Association of Dental Research. Dr. Strassler is on the editorial board of numerous publications and is a consultant and clinical evaluator to more than 15 dental manufacturers. Dr. Strassler has published more than 500 articles in the field of restorative dentistry and innovations in dental practice and has coauthored seven chapters in textbooks. He has presented at more than 425 programs, including most of the major programs throughout the United States, Canada, and Europe. Dr. Strassler has a general practice in Baltimore, Maryland, that is limited to restorative dentistry and aesthetics.

Judith Porter, DDS, MA, EdD, is assistant dean of admissions and recruitment at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry, where she directly oversees the admissions process for the Doctor of Dental Surgery program. Dr. Porter is an operative dentist with a special interest in educational methods within preclinical and clinical dentistry. Before joining the University of Maryland, Dr. Porter was in private practice for 25 years.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Elena Francisco, RDH, RDHAP, MSDH, received her bachelor of science degree in dental hygiene from Loma Linda University and her master’s degree in dental hygiene education from Idaho State University. She is currently an adjunct clinical instructor in dental hygiene at Carrington College in Sacramento, California. Prior to joining the faculty at Carrington College, Ms. Francisco was a clinical instructor in dental hygiene at the University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry, where she served as a CAMBRA resource for dental hygiene students. A licensed registered dental hygienist and registered dental hygienist in alternative practice, Ms. Francisco has practiced dental hygiene in California for more than 40 years. She has coauthored several journal articles on dental hygienists’ knowledge, attitudes, and practice behaviors regarding caries risk assessment and management. Ms. Francisco has been a member of the statewide Task Force on Oral Health for People with Special Needs and is a cofounding member of the Oral Health Awareness Society and a member of a local task force whose goal is to reduce early childhood caries. She volunteers dental hygiene services to the dentally underserved in California.

Probiotics and the Oral Cavity, Updated 1st Edition

Price: $19.95 
Item # L0760  

Release Date: December 2, 2010

Review Date: July 27, 2016

Expiration Date: July 26, 2019

 

Good mental and physical health depends on strong interpersonal relationships, daily exercise, and a balanced, nutritious diet. Factors adversely affecting health include the increased use of antibiotics and other potent pharmaceutical agents, as well as the effects of professional (work-related) and personal stress. There has been a steady growth of interest in, and awareness of, the beneficial effects of certain microorganisms, typically those derived from fermented milk products, on the health and viability of the GI tract. It is now widely accepted that microorganisms such as L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus support healthy indigenous intestinal flora and may be effective in alleviating a number of digestive and other problems.

One result of this increased awareness has been a greater interest in prebiotics and probiotics. A growing body of work has focused on the benefits of probiotics therapy for the oral cavity and there is mounting evidence that certain probiotic strains may be very beneficial to oral health. The basis of the therapeutic mode is that ingested probiotic bacterial species provide effector bacterial strains that replace pathogens and control bacterial disease. Probiotics for the oral cavity is an exciting area of dental care research and eventually may offer a novel and effective approach to treating or even preventing periodontal disease and denture stomatitis. This basic-level course familiarizes dental professionals with the role of intestinal flora in the human gut, the physiological effects of probiotics in the body, and the specific function of probiotics in the oral cavity.

 

 

AGD Subject Code: 150
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the role of intestinal flora in the body.
  • Describe probiotics and their sources.
  • Explain the physiology of probiotics in the body.
  • Describe the role of probiotics in the oral cavity.
  • Identify commercial probiotic formulations.
Author Bio(s)

 

J. Anthony von Fraunhofer, MSc, PhD, FRSC, is professor emeritus, University of Maryland Dental School, Baltimore, Maryland, where he also served as director of biomaterials research in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. He has written more than 400 scientific papers and 16 books, and contributed chapters to 15 monographs on dental biomaterials and materials science. Dr. von Fraunhofer is the author of the well-regarded monographs Dental Materials at a Glance and Research Writing in Dentistry, published by Wiley-Blackwell. His special interests are the biomechanical properties of materials used in medicine and dentistry, and the degradation, wear, and corrosion of materials in the biosystem.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for 4 years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

Dental Unit Waterline Contamination: Causes, Concerns, and Control, Updated 1st Edition

Price: $9.95 
Item # L0716  

Original Release Date: November 2, 2012

Review Date: October 22, 2015

Expiration Date: April 21, 2021

This course offers a comprehensive overview of the problem of dental unit waterline (DUWL) contamination. The Environmental Protection Agency regulates drinking water in the public water supply to ensure that the number of water organisms is kept at an acceptable level. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that the water emitted from dental handpieces and air/water syringes be the same quality as drinking water. 

Due to the extremely narrow DUWL tubing through which patient treatment water is delivered, and the frequent periods of water stagnation, the inner surfaces of tubing provide a particularly favorable environment for the multiplication of microorganisms. Contact of the oral cavity or other routes of entry with water from a dental unit containing large numbers of microorganisms is incompatible with infection control standard of care and inconsistent with the public’s expectations of modern dentistry. 

It is widely accepted that dental unit waterline contamination be controlled to protect dental workers and patients from aerosolized, inhaled, and ingested microbes. Therefore, dental practitioners should have an understanding of the problem and current approaches to improving the quality of the water in dental units.  

This basic-level course discusses the complexity of DUWL contamination and the importance of monitoring contamination levels. The methods used to control microbial growth and the limitations associated with current approaches are also explained. Participants learn how to judiciously choose a DUWL disinfectant best suited to their practice needs.
 
AGD Subject Code: 148

Western Schools designates this activity for 1 continuing education credit.

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
  • Shannon E. Mills has disclosed that he is a copatent holder for Air Controlled Sterile Irrigation System, marketed under license from the U.S. Air Force by Aseptico, Inc., Woodinville, WA. Western Schools ensures that this content is free from bias and commercial influence through its peer-review process.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Identify the causes of dental unit waterline contamination.
  • Describe national standards and guidelines for dental unit waterline quality.
  • Describe the types of microorganisms recovered from dental unit waterlines.
  • Explain the consequences of dental unit waterline contamination.
  • Identify the current approaches to improving dental unit waterline quality and their limitations.
  • Explain the rationale and methods available for monitoring dental unit waterline quality.
Author Bio(s)

Nuala B. Porteous, BDS, MPH, received her bachelor (the Irish equivalent of the American doctorate) of dental surgery degree (BDS) from University College Cork, Ireland, in 1976. She earned her master’s in public health degree (MPH) from The University of Texas Health Science Center (UTHSC), School of Public Health, at Houston in 1992. She is a diplomate of the American Board of Dental Public Health. She is currently an associate professor/research in the Department of Comprehensive Dentistry, UTHSC San Antonio (UTHSCSA) Dental School. She has held previous faculty appointments at UTHSCSA in the Department of Community Dentistry as a clinical instructor (1995-1998), assistant professor (1998-2005), associate professor (2005-2007), and infectious diseases fellow in the Department of General Dentistry (2000-2002). Dr. Porteous is a member of the American National Standards Institute/American Dental Association Standards Committee for Dental Products. Her research activities include infection control, with a particular focus on dental unit waterline contamination. She has authored or coauthored numerous scholarly articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals and has presented her research at many national and international scientific meetings.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Shannon E. Mills, DDS, FAGD, FICD, is vice president for professional relations and science for Northeast Delta Dental in Concord New Hampshire. Dr. Mills retired from the U.S. Air Force as a colonel in 2005. He has authored or coauthored numerous articles on dental infection control in peer-reviewed journals and was a member of the American Dental Association (ADA) panel that drafted the 1995 statement on dental unit waterlines. He is a consultant to the ADA Council on Scientific Affairs and contributed to the 2003 CDC Guidelines for Infection Control in Dental Health-Care Settings. Dr Mills was chair of the Organization for Safety, Asepsis and Prevention from 2001 to 2002. He currently serves as a committee chair for the ADA/American National Standards Institute Standards Committee for Dental Products and is a member of the U.S. delegation to ISO Technical Committee 106, Dentistry.

Reduction of Bioaerosol in the Dental Office, 2nd Edition

Price: $9.95 
Item # L0782  

Release Date: July 30, 2013

Review Date: September 19, 2016

Expiration Date: September 18, 2019

 

Globally, viral, bacterial, and fungal diseases have been emerging at an alarming rate since the 1980s. Among the most worrisome are bloodborne diseases such as AIDS, caused by HIV, and viral hepatitis B, C, D, and G. Antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria and fungus are increasing in frequency and are becoming more resistant to the currently available antimicrobial agents.

The best approach to reducing the risk of infection transmissions in the dental office is the use of universal precautions. This method includes the standard precautions of hand washing, use of personal protective equipment, proper cleaning and disinfection, and injury prevention. However, even with these precautions in place, the bioaerosol generated during dental procedures is responsible for the dissemination of many organisms.

This basic-level course discusses the issue of bioaerosol and reviews interventions that can dramatically reduce bioaerosol contamination during the delivery of oral care. Dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants can benefit from the overview of the risks of contamination associated with bioaerosol. This course discusses management of dental unit waterline contamination and suggests appropriate dental equipment necessary for providing sterile water for oral surgical procedures. Finally, the course reviews the importance of preprocedural rinsing as a step in reducing the potential for infection for both practitioner and patient.

 

 

AGD Subject Code: 148
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 1 continuing education credit.

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe bioaerosol, including the methods by which it can be reduced and the associated risks of contamination.
  • Describe the management of dental unit waterline contamination and the alternatives to self-contained water delivery systems.
  • Identify the importance of preprocedural rinsing in minimizing the infectious potential of patient-generated bioaerosol.
Author Bio(s)

 

Louis G. DePaola, DDS, MS, is a professor and the assistant dean of clinical affairs in the Department of Oncology and Diagnostic Sciences at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry in Baltimore. He received his DDS in 1975 and completed a master of science degree in oral biology in 1981, both from the University of Maryland. He is a diplomate of the American Board of Oral Medicine and the American College of Dentists, and holds a certificate in prosthodontics. He is the director for dental training for the Pennsylvania/Mid Atlantic AIDS Education and Training Center and served as a member of the American Dental Association (ADA) Council on Scientific Affairs from 2002 to 2005. Dr. DePaola has presented at the national meetings of most major dental
associations and at numerous international conferences. He has authored or coauthored more than 130 journal articles, book chapters, and abstracts. He serves as a consultant to the ADA, other professional groups, and private industry. Over the past 20 years, Dr. DePaola has been awarded more than 75 research and service grants, many in the field of antiplaque chemotherapeutic agents, HIV/AIDS, management of medically compromised dental patients, rapid salivary diagnostic testing, dental unit waterlines, and infection control. In 2015, Dr. DePaola was appointed to the Maryland Board of Dental Examiners.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

Want more choices?
Want more choices?