Disciplines: Dental Hygienist
Hours: 11 Contact Hours
Item#: LH1GA

 

Sign up for the Western Schools 365 Online Membership
Online Access to all our dental CE courses for a full year!

Georgia 11-Hour Dental Hygienist Bundle


Reg. Prices
Just $76.95
Item # LH1GA
New
When available, the Online Course format is included with the hard copy, eBook, or audio book formats!

This product includes the following courses:
Click on the title to see more and read the course

Risk Factors in Periodontal Disease, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0787  

Release Date: July 31, 2013

Review Date: October 6, 2016

Expiration Date: October 5, 2019

 

Despite advances in oral health care, nearly half of adults in the United States suffer from some form of periodontal disease, making this disease second in prevalence only to obesity.  Periodontal disease has a significant impact on the health and well-being of those affected and is the most common cause of tooth loss among adults.

A number of systemic risk factors, such as diabetes mellitus and HIV infection, increase the risk of periodontal disease. Modifiable risk factors include smoking, poor oral hygiene, and poor diet. Nonmodifiable risk factors, such as genetic makeup, may also play a role in the disease but the causes of periodontal disease are complex, and environmental factors appear capable of overriding either genetic resistance or susceptibility to periodontal disease.

This basic-level course provides an overview of the systemic factors and systemic diseases associated with the development of periodontal disease. The course outlines the ways that various factors can contribute to periodontal disease and can predict the progress of disease. Clinical steps in assessing and diagnosing periodontal disease are also discussed.

 

 

AGD Subject Code: 490
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

 

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the relationship between periodontal disease and systemic factors.
  • Describe the relationship between periodontal disease and systemic diseases.
  • Identify the association between genetic factors and periodontal disease.
  • Outline the clinical steps in assessing periodontal risk factors.
Author Bio(s)

 

John F. Kross, DMD, MSc, received his doctorate in dental medicine from Temple University School of Dentistry in Philadelphia. He completed a fellowship at Temple University Hospital in oral oncology and received a hospital appointment to the Department of Dentistry at the Medical Centers of Delaware (now the Christiana Health Care System). His professional training and experience include practicing general dentistry in Wilmington, Delaware, and in New London, Pennsylvania, as well as instructing students at Delaware Technical Community College in oral pathology. Dr. Kross has received numerous academic awards for his work in oral surgery, fixed partial prosthodontics, periodontics, and endodontics. He has been composing monographs, manuscripts, and continuing medical education courses since 1991.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Raymond K. Martin, DDS, MAGD, graduated in 1979 from Texas Tech University with a bachelor’s degree in microbiology and earned his DDS in 1983 from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. He then went on to study at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine in the General Practice Residency Program. Dr. Martin began his work in dental risk management after being awarded a Mastership in the Academy of General Dentistry. He consults with 20 legal firms as an expert witness and lectures extensively on dental risk management and ethics in dentistry. In addition, Dr. Martin teaches CAD/CAM dentistry as a CEREC mentor and has served as a Key Opinion Leader for an international dental implant manufacturer. Dr. Martin has maintained a private practice for more than three decades and is currently president of the Massachusetts Dental Society. He has served the American Dental Association on the Future of Dentistry work group and is currently a member of the Council on Government Affairs.

Dental Erosion: Causes and Preventative Practices, 2nd Edition

Price: $19.95 
Item # L0781  

Release Date: July 30, 2013

Review Date: September 19, 2016

Expiration Date: September 18, 2019

Dental erosion is a progressive loss of dental hard tissue caused by chemical processes without involvement of bacteria. This enamel dissolution is an irreversible process not directly associated with mechanical or traumatic factors, which distinguishes it from other types of wear, such as attrition (loss of tooth structure due to clenching or grinding), abrasion (mechanical loss of tooth structure caused by a foreign element), or abfraction (loss of tooth structure at the gumline due to occlusal forces). The clinical features of dental erosion appear as well-defined, wedge-shaped areas facially and cervically. The occurrence of enamel erosion lesions is associated primarily with intrinsic and extrinsic acids.

The rise in consumption of soft drinks, including sports drinks, has been linked to increases in the rates of dental erosion. The additives to these drinks, not the beverage pH per se, appear to be the causative factors contributing to enamel dissolution. Furthermore, fruit-flavored drinks and unsweetened juices appear to have the same erosive potential as carbonated drinks.

This basic-level course provides dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants with guidelines for recognizing and diagnosing dental erosion and offers suggestions for preventive interventions, including record-keeping, nutritional counseling, fluoride use, and home-care procedures. The course also discusses recommended restorative treatment options.

 

 

AGD Subject Code: 741

 
Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

 

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Recognize dental erosion and its causes.
  • Describe preventive interventions and restorative treatment options.
Author Bio(s)

 

Marion C. Manski, RDH, MS, has practiced clinical dental hygiene for more than 30 years. She is a graduate of the Forsyth School for Dental Hygienists, the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, and most recently the University of Maryland, Baltimore, where she earned her master’s degree. Ms. Manski is an associate professor in and the director of the Dental Hygiene Program, University of Maryland School of Dentistry. She provides clinical and didactic instruction to junior and senior dental hygiene students. Ms. Manski is also in private practice. Her research interests include nutrition, dental caries, and caries prevention.

J. Anthony von Fraunhofer, MSc, PhD, FADM, FRSC, is professor emeritus, University of Maryland Dental School, Baltimore, Maryland, where he also served as director of biomaterials research in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. He has written more than 400 scientific papers and 16 books, and contributed chapters to 15 monographs on dental biomaterials and materials science. Dr. von Fraunhofer is the author of the well-regarded monographs Dental Materials at a Glance and Research Writing in Dentistry, published by Wiley-Blackwell. His special interests are the biomechanical properties of materials used in medicine and dentistry, and the degradation, wear, and corrosion of materials in the biosystem.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

Dental Ethics and the Digital Age: 3 Hour, Updated 1st Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0948  

Review Date: August 7, 2018

Expiration Date: August 7, 2021

Original Release Date: January 28, 2016

The practice of dentistry is multifaceted. Not only must dental professionals have the technical skills to treat patients appropriately and safely, they must also practice within a professional ethical framework that is sometimes more challenging than the dental procedures themselves. This basic-level course helps dental professionals gain a better understanding of dental ethics, professionalism, and current ethical challenges to the profession, with particular emphasis on the impact of the digital age. Dental professionals may be eager to incorporate the latest technologies into their practices and into their private lives, but must consider the ethical implications of doing so.

 

AGD Subject Code:  555

Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

This course should not be taken in conjunction with L0900 - Dental Ethics and the Digital Age: 2 Hour, Updated 1st Edition.

Fulfills Ethics requirement in the following states: Arizona, Hawaii, Kansas, Minnesota, North Dakota, and Oklahoma.

This course is the updated version of course L0724 - Dental Ethics and the Digital Age: 3 Hour

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the evolution of healthcare ethics, including events that affected development of the principles of ethics that guide the dental profession.
  • Describe how codes of ethics and concepts of professionalism guide the dental practitioner’s
    relationships and obligations.
  • Discuss the relationship of ethics to legal obligations.
  • Identify current and emerging ethical challenges facing dental professionals.
  • Describe how ethical decision making models help dental professionals recognize and address
    ethical dilemmas in practice.
Author Bio(s)

Toni M. Roucka, RN, DDS, MA, is an associate professor and associate dean for academic affairs at Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine in Alton, Illinois. She is a Fellow of the American College of Dentists and current president of the American Society for Dental Ethics, a special section of the American College of Dentists. Dr. Roucka obtained her DDS degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry and master’s degree in population health – bioethics from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Roucka is a nationally recognized speaker and has written extensively on the subject of ethics in dentistry. She currently writes a regular ethics column for General Dentistry, the journal of the Academy of General Dentistry.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Odette Aguirre, DDS, MS, MPH, is Assistant Clinical Professor in the Department of Biomedical and Applied Sciences at Indiana University School of Dentistry in Indianapolis, Indiana, and Affiliate Faculty at the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies at Indiana University, in Bloomington, Indiana. She has recently been nominated as a Fellow of the American College of Dentists and serves as a Member-at-Large of the American Society for Dental Ethics, a special section of the American College of Dentists. Dr. Aguirre obtained her DDS degree from Universidad Francisco MarroquĂ­n in Guatemala City, where she grew up. After graduation, she completed a General Practice Residency at Eastman Dental Center in Rochester, NY, where she also obtained an MS from the University of Rochester. She obtained a bioethics degree from Indiana University’s Department of Philosophy and an MPH from the Fairbanks School of Public Health. At IUSD, she is Director of the “Ethics and Professionalism” courses for first and second year dental students, and co-leads ethics rounds and a clinical ethics consultation service for third and fourth year dental students. Dr. Aguirre is IUSD’s Director of Interprofessional Ethics Seminars, a series of workshops with various healthcare professionals and students, meant to foster collaborative ethics discussions. She is Associate Producer of a series of ethical dilemma videos in a collaboration between IUSD and the American College of Dentists.

Caries Management by Risk Assessment: CAMBRA in Dental Practice, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # L0889  

Review Date: August 3, 2018

Expiration Date: August 3, 2021

Original Release Date: July 5, 2011

This basic-level course provides a comprehensive overview of the evolution of caries management and applies the concepts of CAMBRA. This course will help dental practitioners become better equipped to halt the progression of caries with as little hard tissue damage as possible, thereby benefiting their patients. And the learner will be introduced to different protocols in order to treat caries using the medical model.

 

AGD Subject Code: 250

Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Discuss the evolution of caries management and the philosophies of minimal intervention dentistry, minimally invasive dentistry, and caries management by risk assessment in the practice of dentistry.
  • Discuss the factors affecting caries risk.
  • Explain the importance of saliva testing.
  • Identify different protocols to treat caries using the medical model.
  • Discuss the risks, alternatives, and benefits of using glass ionomers as dental sealants.
Author Bio(s)

Amy Nieves, RDH, graduated from Middlesex County College in Edison, New Jersey, in 1999 and launched www.amyrdh.com to serve as an online resource for dental hygiene students, clinical hygien-ists, educators, and other dental professionals. From 2000 to 2007, Ms. Nieves was a regular con-tributor to the peer-reviewed journal Contemporary Oral Hygiene with her monthly column, “Hygiene Solutions.” Her articles have appeared in various dental hygiene publications. In 2004, she co-authored The Purple Guide: Developing Your Clinical Dental Hygiene Career with Shirley Gutkowski, RDH, BSDH. Ms. Nieves was the southern Michigan specialist for GC America, Inc., from 2007 to 2010 and has also been the eastern Pennsylvania clinical specialist for OralDNA.

Elena Francisco, RDH, RDHAP, MSDH, received her bachelor of science degree in dental hygiene from Loma Linda University and her master’s degree in dental hygiene education from Idaho State University. She is currently an adjunct clinical instructor in dental hygiene at Carrington College in Sacramento, California. Prior to joining the faculty at Carrington College, Ms. Francisco was a clini­cal instructor in dental hygiene at the University of the Pacific Arthur Dugoni School of Dentistry. A licensed registered dental hygienist in alternative practice, Ms. Francisco has co-authored several journal articles on dental hygienists’ knowledge, attitudes, and practice behaviors regarding caries risk assessment and management.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Douglas A. Young, DDS, EdD, MS, MBA, is a Professor at the University of the Pacific where he is an active and ardent educator in the field of minimally invasive dentistry and cariology. He was one of the founders of the CAMBRA (caries management by risk assessment) Coalition, American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Cariology Section, and the American Academy of Cariology (AAC). Dr. Young served on the ADA Council of Scientific Affairs (2012 to 2016) and is currently a member of the ADA Evidence-based Dentistry (EBD) Leaders network and a cariology consultant for the ADA. Dr. Young has presented at congresses and universities around the world. Dr. Young has been published in numerous peer-reviewed dental journals and textbooks focusing on minimally invasive dentistry, silver fluoride, glass ionomer, and CAMBRA.

Want more choices?
Want more choices?