Disciplines:
  • Dentists
  • Dental Hygienists
  • Dental Assisting
  • Hours: 2 Contact Hours
    Author(s):
  • Marion C. Manski, RDH, MS
  • J. A. von Fraunhofer, MSc, PhD, FADM, FRSC
  • Peer Reviewer(s):Veronica Powers, DMD
    Item#: L0781
    Contents: 1 Course Book (26 pages)
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    Dental Erosion: Causes and Preventative Practices, 2nd Edition



    Price $19.95
    Item # L0781
    New
    When available, the Online Course format is included with the hard copy, eBook, or audio book formats!

    Release Date: July 30, 2013

    Review Date: September 19, 2016

    Expiration Date: September 18, 2019

    Dental erosion is a progressive loss of dental hard tissue caused by chemical processes without involvement of bacteria. This enamel dissolution is an irreversible process not directly associated with mechanical or traumatic factors, which distinguishes it from other types of wear, such as attrition (loss of tooth structure due to clenching or grinding), abrasion (mechanical loss of tooth structure caused by a foreign element), or abfraction (loss of tooth structure at the gumline due to occlusal forces). The clinical features of dental erosion appear as well-defined, wedge-shaped areas facially and cervically. The occurrence of enamel erosion lesions is associated primarily with intrinsic and extrinsic acids.

    The rise in consumption of soft drinks, including sports drinks, has been linked to increases in the rates of dental erosion. The additives to these drinks, not the beverage pH per se, appear to be the causative factors contributing to enamel dissolution. Furthermore, fruit-flavored drinks and unsweetened juices appear to have the same erosive potential as carbonated drinks.

    This basic-level course provides dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants with guidelines for recognizing and diagnosing dental erosion and offers suggestions for preventive interventions, including record-keeping, nutritional counseling, fluoride use, and home-care procedures. The course also discusses recommended restorative treatment options.

     

    AGD Subject Code: 741

     
    Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

    Course Objectives
    • Recognize dental erosion and its causes.
    • Describe preventive interventions and restorative treatment options.

    Marion C. Manski, RDH, MS, has practiced clinical dental hygiene for more than 30 years. She is a graduate of the Forsyth School for Dental Hygienists, the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, and most recently the University of Maryland, Baltimore, where she earned her master’s degree. Ms. Manski is an associate professor in and the director of the Dental Hygiene Program, University of Maryland School of Dentistry. She provides clinical and didactic instruction to junior and senior dental hygiene students. Ms. Manski is also in private practice. Her research interests include nutrition, dental caries, and caries prevention.

    J. Anthony von Fraunhofer, MSc, PhD, FADM, FRSC, is professor emeritus, University of Maryland Dental School, Baltimore, Maryland, where he also served as director of biomaterials research in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. He has written more than 400 scientific papers and 16 books, and contributed chapters to 15 monographs on dental biomaterials and materials science. Dr. von Fraunhofer is the author of the well-regarded monographs Dental Materials at a Glance and Research Writing in Dentistry, published by Wiley-Blackwell. His special interests are the biomechanical properties of materials used in medicine and dentistry, and the degradation, wear, and corrosion of materials in the biosystem.

    Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

    • Courses must be completed within one (1) year of the date of purchase or by the expiration date indicated above, whichever date comes first.
    • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
    • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
    • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
    • There are no prerequisites for this course.