Disciplines:
  • Dentists
  • Dental Hygienists
  • Dental Assisting
  • Hours: 10 Contact Hours
    Item#: LAS10

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    Online Access to all our dental CE courses for a full year!

    Dental Assistant Bundle: 10 Hours


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    Item # LAS10
    When available, the Online Course format is included with the hard copy, eBook, or audio book formats!

    This product includes the following courses:
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    Infection Control: A Review and Update, 2nd Edition

    Price: $19.95 
    Item # L0735  

    Release Date:  July 30, 2013

    Review Date: May 16, 2016

    Expiration Date: May 15, 2019

     

    In the course of the provision of dental care, patients and dental healthcare personnel can be exposed to pathogens through contact with blood, oral and respiratory secretions, and contaminated equipment. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) strives to provide recommendations for infection control in the dental office that are clear, practical, and evidence based. Most of today’s practicing dentists work in a private practice setting, in which patients are seen in an outpatient ambulatory care facility. Without the benefit of working with an infection control specialist, it becomes the dentist’s responsibility to monitor and recommend safe practices.

    For the purpose of education, training should be provided to all new employees. Training should also be included with any new procedures that are introduced that may pose a risk. It is important to remember in designing a training program that material and content should be appropriate to the duties of the employee and taught at a level of understanding for every individual involved.

    This basic-level course provides an overview of standard precautions and routine practice for infection control in a dental practice. The concept of the "chain of infection" is explained along with the use of personal protective equipment such as gloves, masks, and eyewear. Proper instrument sterilization techniques are outlined.

     

    AGD Subject Code: 148
     
    Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

     

     

    Disclosures
    • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
    • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
    • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
    • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
    • There are no prerequisites for this course.
    Objectives

    Course Objectives

    • Describe the modes and mechanisms of transmission of pathogenic organisms.
    • Identify the engineering and work practice controls used to prevent infection.
    • Describe current practices for preventing percutaneous injuries.
    • Outline effective hand hygiene practices.
    • Describe the proper use of personal protective equipment.
    • Differentiate between disinfection and sterilization.
    Author Bio(s)

     

    Eric Levine, DDS, is a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Endodontics, Prosthodontics and Operative Dentistry of the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, Dental School, University of Maryland. Dr. Levine also maintains a private practice in Olney, Maryland, with a focus on restorative dentistry. His research interests include the study of dental materials and incorporating technology into practice and teaching.

     

    Content Editor

    Radiation Health, Safety, and Protection, 2nd Edition

    Price: $19.95 
    Item # L0796  

    Release Date: July 31, 2013

    Review Date: November 11, 2016

    Expiration Date: November 10, 2019

     

    Understanding the forms of radiation and the risks and effects associated with dental radiography is essential to providing the highest quality of care to the dental patient. Appropriate for all dental professionals, this basic-level course outlines radiation risk, the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation, and the measurement and regulation of radiation dose.  The course discusses the ALARA concept, its application in dentistry, and best practices to reduce radiation exposure to the dental patient. The necessity for diagnostic radiographs is essential, and the risk associated with these radiographs is minimal. However, all radiation exposure has the potential to cause biological damage, and radiation damage is cumulative over an individual’s lifetime. Therefore, an informed dental professional who has a broad knowledge of the nature of ionizing radiation and its potential health effects is best able to convey accurate information and a professional attitude that engenders patient confidence. It is important to educate patients with regard to potential risks and how those risks should be expressed and managed as well as how they compare with other normal activities. Dental professionals should encourage patients to be risk informed and to take an active role in managing their own safety and health concerns.

     

     

    AGD Subject Code: 165
     
    Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

     

     

    Disclosures
    • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
    • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
    • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
    • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
    • There are no prerequisites for this course.
    Objectives

    Course Objectives

    • Distinguish between the two forms of radiation and their associated hazards.
    • Identify the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation.
    • Describe the measurement and regulation of radiation dose.
    • Describe the ALARA concept and its application in dentistry.
    • Identify best practices for reducing radiation dose.
    • Discuss the risk assessment of radiation.
    Author Bio(s)

     

    Linda Otis, DDS, MS, received her dental degree from the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Lincoln, Nebraska and completed advanced training in radiology at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in San Antonio, Texas. Dr. Otis served as associate professor and director of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine in Philadelphia and as professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology at the University of Maryland, Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, in Baltimore. Dr. Otis initiated research on the applications of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in dentistry while at the University of California, San Francisco, Dental School and later implemented her research with the Medical Technology Program scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. As one of the foremost authorities on OCT, Dr. Otis actively researched new methods for diagnosing common oral conditions as principal investigator of a National Institutes of Health research grant. She has lectured throughout the United States on many topics in dentistry, has published widely, and is named on three OCT patents.

     

    Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

    Raymond K. Martin, DDS, MAGD, graduated in 1979 from Texas Tech University with a bachelor’s degree in microbiology and earned his DDS in 1983 from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. He then went on to study at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine in the General Practice Residency Program. Dr. Martin began his work in dental risk management after being awarded a Mastership in the Academy of General Dentistry. He consults with 20 legal firms as an expert witness and lectures extensively on dental risk management and ethics in dentistry. In addition, Dr. Martin teaches CAD/CAM dentistry as a CEREC mentor and has served as a Key Opinion Leader for an international dental implant manufacturer. Dr. Martin has maintained a private practice for more than three decades and is president of the Massachusetts Dental Society. He has served the American Dental Association on the Future of Dentistry work group and is a member of the Council on Government Affairs.

    Dental Sealants: Clinical Considerations for Selection and Placement

    Price: $29.95 
    Item # L0777  

    Release Date: August 23, 2016

    Expiration Date: August 22, 2019

     

    Sealants are seen as a major preventive intervention because of the high prevalence of pit and fissure caries. The teeth most at risk are the newly erupted first molars, because the enamel is in its formative stage of maturation. The ADA and AAPD recognize that, when applied properly, sealants can play an important role in the prevention of tooth decay.

    This basic-level course reviews the latest research and recommendations regarding the use of dental sealants. The course discusses the epidemiology of caries disease and the materials currently used in dental sealants. Research findings on the effectiveness of sealants are presented, as well as the clinical considerations that must factor into any practitioner’s decision to use dental sealants. Techniques for actual placement of dental sealants are outlined along with information on post-placement evaluation and follow-up care. Finally, safety concerns, including systemic toxicity, are discussed.

     

     

    AGD Subject Code: 257

     
    Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

     

     

    Disclosures
    • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
    • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
    • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
    • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
    • There are no prerequisites for this course.
    Objectives

    Course Objectives

    • Discuss the epidemiology of dental caries.
    • Identify the materials used for dental sealants.
    • Explain the effectiveness of dental sealants.
    • List the clinical considerations for dental sealants.
    • Discuss placement techniques for dental sealants.
    • Explain the safety of dental sealants.
    Author Bio(s)

     

    Elena Francisco, RDH, RDHAP, MSDH, received her bachelor of science degree in dental hygiene from Loma Linda University and her master’s degree in dental hygiene education from Idaho State University. She is currently an adjunct clinical instructor in dental hygiene at Carrington College in Sacramento, California. Prior to joining the faculty at Carrington College, Ms. Francisco was a clinical instructor in dental hygiene at the University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry, where she served as a CAMBRA resource for dental hygiene students. A licensed registered dental hygienist and registered dental hygienist in alternative practice, Ms. Francisco has practiced dental hygiene in California for more than 40 years. She has coauthored several journal articles on dental hygienists’ knowledge, attitudes, and practice behaviors regarding caries risk assessment and management. Ms. Francisco has been a member of the statewide Task Force on Oral Health for People with Special Needs, cofounding member of the Oral Health Awareness Society, and member of a local task force whose goal is to reduce early childhood caries. She volunteers dental hygiene services to the dentally underserved in California.

     

    Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

    Toni M. Roucka, RN, DDS, MA, is an associate professor of restorative dentistry at Southern Illinois University, School of Dental Medicine, Edwardsville. She maintains an active nursing license and is a Fellow of the American College of Dentists and immediate past president of the American Society for Dental Ethics. Dr. Roucka obtained her DDS degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry and master’s degree in population health – bioethics from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Roucka is a nationally recognized speaker on the subject of ethics in dentistry and has taught restorative dentistry at both Marquette University and the Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine. As a volunteer, she has provided dental care to underserved populations in Guatemala, Venezuela, the Dominican Republic, and Tanzania.

    Managing the Adult Dental Phobic Patient, 2nd Edition

    Price: $29.95 
    Item # L0737  

    Release Date:  July 31, 2013

    Review Date: May 16, 2016

    Expiration Date: May 15, 2019

     

    Dental phobia may be a universal barrier to seeking oral health care. Dental phobics are not comfortable seeking regular dental care, even when dental problems arise. The dental team needs to be aware of the concerns of this population in order to reduce fear and anxiety and provide needed oral health care.

    This basic-level course distinguishes between the definitions of fear, anxiety, and phobia. It identifies the most common reactions that accompany phobias and common reasons for avoidance of dental treatment. The course describes the behavioral treatment options for anxious dental patients and techniques for reducing general anxiety in dental patients. This course will provide dental professionals with basic knowledge and information on dental fear and avoidance that will enable them to diagnose and manage patients who experience dental-related anxiety, fear, and phobia. This knowledge will help dental professionals prepare for these patients and their unique needs and help these patients feel more comfortable seeking their care in the future.

    AGD Subject Code: 153; California Course #03-4640-16-737

     

    Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

    Disclosures
    • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
    • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
    • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that the course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
    • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
    • There are no prerequisites for this course.
    Objectives

    Course Objectives

    • Define fear, anxiety, and phobia and their common behavioral manifestations.
    • Distinguish among the four types of anxiety.
    • Identify the techniques used to reduce anxiety in dental patients.
    • Describe the psychological and pharmacological treatment techniques used to manage dental fears, phobias, and anxiety.
    • Describe an effective local injection technique used for fearful or phobic dental patients.
    Author Bio(s)

     

    Ellen Dietz-Bourguignon, BS, CDA-Emeritus, earned her bachelor of science degree in allied health education in dental auxiliary utilization and a community college teaching certificate from the State University of New York at Buffalo. She began her dental career as an associate-degreed certified dental assistant in private practice. Following a 7-year dental assisting teaching career at Orange County Community College, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Erie County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, and Niagara County Community College, she began writing on dental topics for Dental Assisting Magazine, eventually rising to the position of managing editor. Ms. Dietz-Bourguignon has worked in dental marketing, project management, and product development at Semantodontics and in legal administration for the Arizona State Board of Dental Examiners. She has published five books in the dental assisting market, including Dental Office Management and Safety Standards and Infection Control for Dental Assistants, and has been keynote speaker at the American Dental Assistants Association Annual Session. Her articles have appeared in numerous journals, including The Dental Assistant, Dentist, The Dental Student, Dental Economics, RDH, and Dental Teamwork.

     

    Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

    Toni M. Roucka, RN, DDS, MA, is an associate professor of restorative dentistry and associate dean for academic affairs at Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine in Alton, Illinois. She maintains an active nursing license and is a Fellow of the American College of Dentists and immediate president of the American Society for Dental Ethics. Dr. Roucka obtained her DDS degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry and master’s degree in population health – bioethics from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Roucka is a nationally recognized speaker on the subject of ethics in dentistry and has taught restorative dentistry at both Marquette University and Southern Illinois University School of Dental Medicine.

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