Disciplines:
  • Dentists
  • Dental Hygienists
  • Dental Assistants
Hours: 25 Contact Hours
Item#: LGR25
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25-Hour Dental Bundle


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Item # LGR25
When available, the Online Course format is included with the hard copy, eBook, or audio book formats!

This product includes the following courses:
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Protecting Patient Safety in the Dental Office: Preventing Medical/Dental Errors

Price: $19.95 Hours:2 Contact Hours
Item # L0492  

Release Date: November 10, 2014
Expiration Date: November 9, 2017


The field of patient safety is dynamic and exciting. Keeping patients safe requires a major interdisciplinary effort, in which professionals across all fields forge new types of relationships. It also requires that dental professionals reexamine the hierarchical structure of healthcare and embrace the idea of systems thinking.

Despite a concerted effort over the past decade, medical/dental error rates have not decreased. On the national and international fronts, several large innovative initiatives are being conducted by government and private stakeholders. Additionally, in private offices, hospitals, long-term care facilities, ambulatory clinics, and other dental settings, dental professionals are trying and evaluating new approaches. These approaches range from unit-level safety projects to major investments in safety technology. At the same time, the patient’s role in preventing medical/dental errors is expanding and earning new respect among healthcare providers.

This basic-level course discusses the current state of medical/dental errors and patient safety. Different types and causes of medical/dental errors and their legal and ethical implications are discussed, strategies to prevent or control medical/dental errors are presented, and methods of identifying, analyzing, and reporting medical/dental errors, including the use of root cause analysis, are highlighted. Vulnerable populations and patient safety initiatives are identified. The course is intended for all dental professionals, including general dentists and dental specialists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants. This course is not designed to give legal advice. Rather, its purpose is to provide dental professionals with information on current issues in medical/dental errors and patient safety.

AGD Subject Code: 159

Florida - Fulfills your medical errors requirement.

Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

Contemporary Management of Traumatic Dental Injuries, Updated 1st Edition

Price: $29.95 Hours:3 Contact Hours
Item # L0715  

Original Release Date: November 2, 2012 

Review Date: October 22, 2015
Expiration Date: October 21, 2018


Traumatic dental injuries (TDI) are commonly encountered in dental practice. In fact, 25% of school-aged children and 33% of adults have experienced TDI to their permanent dentition. These injuries can result in pain, psychological problems, and significant economic implications. 

The entire dental staff should understand basic concepts regarding TDI management in order to triage, treat, and provide appropriate follow-up care for these injuries. Providing a structured presentation of the patient’s clinical appearance and identifying issues that require immediate treatment can not only help the dentist but also significantly improve the treatment outcomes.  In order to properly treat patients who have experienced TDI, it is imperative that the dentist be compassionate, be able to control pain, help heal wounds rather than fix teeth, and be available to these patients by being on call during non-office hours. Approaching an emergent situation confidently can help the patient and/or parent feel at ease and thus allow for optimal treatment. 

The treating dentist must be willing to be a member of a team, which may include specialists such as endodontists, prosthodontists, periodontists, orthodontists, and oral and maxillofacial surgeons. These specialists are often needed for consultation regarding treatment of the acute injury and may also be needed to provide specific services and/or comprehensive long-term care.  

Topics presented in this course include the epidemiology, prevention, general treatment considerations, and protocols for management of the full array of TDI. The sequelae of injuries to primary and permanent teeth are also addressed. This basic-level course is appropriate for dentists and for dental auxiliaries with some prior exposure to TDI.

AGD Subject Code: 314

Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.


Family Violence: Implications for Dental Patients and Practice, Updated 1st Edition

Price: $19.95 Hours:2 Contact Hours
Item # L0712  

Release Date: September 5, 2012

Revised Date: August 26, 2015
Expiration Date: August 25, 2018

Individuals of all age groups can be affected by family violence. Family violence includes child abuse and neglect, intimate partner violence, as well as abuse and neglect of disabled persons, vulnerable adults, and the elderly. Approximately 75% of physical abuse involves injuries to the head, neck, and mouth. Orofacial injuries resulting from family violence are often easy to identify in the dental setting. This basic-level course will enable all members of the dental team to recognize the physical and behavioral signs and symptoms of family violence, differentiate indicators of trauma from normal conditions or accidental injuries, and easily adapt clinical protocols to include identification and intervention for victims of family violence. By applying their knowledge of symptomology and providing appropriate intervention, every member of the dental team can help stem the epidemic of family violence. 

AGD Subject Code: 155 & 156 

Pennsylvania Dental Professionals - This course is not approved to fulfill your child abuse recognition and reporting requirement.

Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

Connecticut – Course #L0719 fulfills your domestic violence requirement.

Florida – Course #L0720 fulfills your domestic violence requirement.

Maryland – Course #L0721 fulfills your abuse & neglect requirement.

New York – Course #L0722 fulfills your child abuse reporting requirement.


Dental Implants: Complications and Peri-Implant Diseases, Updated 1st Edition

Price: $19.95 Hours:2 Contact Hours
Item # L0706  

Release Date: June 29, 2012
Revised Date: June 26, 2015
Expiration Date: June 25, 2018

Dental implants are an established treatment modality in dentistry with a high rate of success and few complications. However, untoward events do occur despite careful treatment planning and meticulous execution of clinical procedures. Surgical complications that can occur include infection, bleeding, wound dehiscence, primary instability of the implant, neurosensory changes, and tissue emphysema. Once the implant is osseointegrated, other complications may arise, including inflammatory peri-implant lesions. Such situations may be limited to inflammation of the peri-implant mucosa or more significantly involve the supporting bone. All these conditions increase the risk of poor outcomes, including implant loss. This intermediate-level course addresses complications associated with dental implants and reviews selective options for their management.


AGD Subject Code: 690

Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

Putting Dental Pain to Rest: Review of Anesthetic Techniques

Price: $29.95 Hours:3 Contact Hours
Item # L0348  

Original Release Date: May 9, 2011 
Review Date: May 7, 2014 
Expiration Date: May 6, 2017 

While dental practitioners want patients to be comfortable, it is evident that better anesthetic techniques must be used to ensure that dental treatment is indeed pain free. This course reviews the most common anesthetic techniques beginning with mandibular nerve locks and proceeding to maxillary blocks. It familiarizes the reader with medical conditions that affect anesthetic choices, methods and techniques to ensure patient comfort during injections, the importance and rational behind needle aspirations, proper injection technique, common barriers to local anesthetic success, and alternatives to traditional local anesthetic for controlling pain. 

AGD Subject Code: 132

Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

Dental Management for Pediatric Patients with Complex Needs, Updated 1st Edition

Price: $29.95 Hours:3 Contact Hours
Item # L0702  

Release Date: May 21, 2012
Review Date: May 19, 2015
Expiration Date: May 18, 2018

Pediatric patients with complex medical and developmental conditions are a unique and growing population. Because these children are especially vulnerable to the oral effects of systemic diseases, it is important that all members of the dental team develop foundational knowledge for the care of this patient population. This course presents information on select morbidities that are typical in these children and adolescents, and aids clinicians in developing rational thought processes for gathering information from these patients and their caregivers. Equipped with this information, the dental team can develop appropriate dental treatment plans and continuing care regimens that best serve their pediatric patients with complex medical needs. 

AGD Subject Code: 436

Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

Geriatric Dentistry: Providing Care for an Aging Population

Price: $19.95 Hours:2 Contact Hours
Item # L0254  

Release Date: April 28, 2014
Expiration Date: April 27, 2017

The number of adults age 65 and older in the U.S. is expected to swell to 72 million by 2030. The aging population will bring both opportunities and challenges to the practice of dentistry. Dentists need to be trained in meeting the oral health needs of older adults to help reduce their burden of chronic disease.

This basic-level course provides dental professionals with basic knowledge and information in gerontology and geriatric dentistry that will enhance their ability to diagnose and manage older patients, distinguish between normal aging-related changes in the tissues of the oral cavity and those resulting from pathological changes, implement appropriate strategies for dealing with patients with cognitive impairments who exhibit care resistance, and make clinical modifications in their dental practices to accommodate the biological changes in their patients that occur as a part of normal aging.

AGD Subject Code: 752

Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

Mini Dental Implants: Indications, Planning & Placement

Price: $19.95 Hours:2 Contact Hours
Item # L0269  

Original Release Date: March 14, 2012 

Review Date: March 12, 2015 
Expiration Date: March 11, 2018

Once considered only for transitional implants, mini dental implants have a success rate that rivals those of traditional implants when accepted placement protocols are followed in patients with adequate bone. This course identifies the indications for mini dental implant denture treatment, describes successful case selection/planning strategies, and discusses the mini dental implant placement protocol for stabilization of a lower denture. The course also explains what is unique and different with maxillary mini dental implant denture cases.

AGD Subject Code: 690

Western Schools designates this activity for 2 continuing education credits.

Update of Concepts in Vital Tooth Whitening, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 Hours:3 Contact Hours
Item # L0727  

Release Date: December 3, 2010

Review Date: June 2, 2016

Expiration Date: June 1, 2019

Vital tooth whitening is an aesthetic and conservative treatment for discolored teeth. The popularity of vital tooth whitening has increased dramatically in recent years, as shown by the increased number of products and procedures introduced, ranging from at-home tray whitening and trayless whitening techniques – both dentist prescribed and over the counter (OTC) – to in-office 1-hour whitening systems. Recent years have also seen the rise of nondental options for vital tooth whitening. The increasing number of vital tooth-whitening techniques and materials has created a clinical challenge for dentists and other oral health providers seeking to balance effectiveness and safety. Proper patient selection for vital tooth whitening becomes even more important in this environment.

Most recently, there has been a push to find ways to accelerate and improve the delivery of the whitening process. These include a number of light sources believed to accelerate the breakdown of peroxide and thus speed up the whitening process. Research in this area is controversial, with the literature describing different conclusions about the benefits of light-activated whitening. The popularity of strip-based peroxide delivery represents a departure from the conventional use of a professionally supervised tray system and raises questions about safety and efficacy.

Patient demand for tooth whitening remains high, and oral health providers have more options for treatment, so it is important that clinicians evaluate which of these options is best for their patients. This basic-level course reviews concepts in vital tooth whitening, including recommendations in ADA guidelines; describes evolving issues in vital tooth whitening (e.g., measurement of color change, the color rebound effect, and safety issues); and explains the risk and benefits of established and new technologies.

AGD Subject Code: 781
 
Western Schools designates this activity for 3 continuing education credits.

Three Drug Classes Every Dentist Should Know: Antibiotics, Analgesics, and Local Anesthetics - Module I: Antibiotics

Price: $9.95 Hours:1 Contact Hour
Item # L0713  

Release Date: September 4, 2015 

Expiration Date: September 3, 2018 

Oral healthcare professionals (OHCPs) are routinely involved with the selection and prescription of antibiotics to either prevent an infection prophylactically or to manage an existing orofacial infection therapeutically. In fact, there are only three major uses of antimicrobial agents in the practice of dentistry: prophylaxis in patients with compromised immune systems caused by certain diseases or medications; prophylaxis in patients at risk for developing infective endocarditis; and treatment of an acute dental infection.  Although OHCPs must stay current with the published guidelines that represent existing standards of care, the evidence in support of these recommendations can be controversial. Regardless of these issues, the appropriate prescribing of antibiotics, while challenging for both dental and medical professionals alike, is vitally important in the overall management of patients.  The practice of overprescribing antibiotics in certain medical and dental situations as well as development of antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria could be greatly abated with closer attention to basic prescription-writing principles. 

This intermediate-level course reviews the pharmacology of antimicrobial agents and presents current guidelines and therapeutic choices in order to optimize antibiotic prescribing practices.  It also discusses the differences among antibiotics typically prescribed for orofacial infections.  The course also explains the appropriate selection of antimicrobial therapy for the pregnant and breastfeeding patient as well as patients with significant allergy histories.  Because the goal of antibiotic therapy is to ensure selection of the right drug at the right time and at the right dose, for the right patient and the right procedure, the information in this course should be considered essential knowledge for all OHCPs, those just starting their career and those needing a mid-career refresher.

AGD Subject Code: 344

Western Schools designates this activity for 1 continuing education credit.

This course is an extraction of, and should not be taken in conjunction with, Three Drug Classes Every Dental Professional Should Know: Antibiotics, Analgesics, and Anesthetics (L0726)

This course shares overlapping content with, and should not be taken in conjunction with, Premedication for Dental Procedures (L0778).


Three Drug Classes Every Dentist Should Know: Antibiotics, Analgesics, and Local Anesthetics - Module II: Analgesics

Price: $9.95 Hours:1 Contact Hour
Item # L0714  

Release Date: September 14, 2015

Expiration Date: September 13, 2018

Oral healthcare professionals (OHCPs) are routinely involved with the selection and prescription of analgesics to address orofacial pain. Pain has both physiological and psychological components, and an experience of poorly managed pain related to dentistry can lead patients to avoid or postpone treatment, making these patients more difficult to treat and less likely to comply with prescribed regimens.  Oral medications administered postoperatively that reduce pain improve clinical outcomes, making them an integral part of dental practice.  Analgesic medications in dentistry are indicated for the relief of acute pain, postoperative pain, and chronic pain, and for controlling adjunctive intraoperative pain (pain not associated with the dental procedure).  In addition, these medications can be given preoperatively (preemptively) to mitigate both postoperative pain and postoperative pain medication requirements.  Overprescription practices and inappropriate prescribing in certain medical and dental pain situations has fueled the growing tragedy of prescription drug abuse.  Most states have created prescription drug monitoring programs, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) continue to closely monitor prescribing practices while tightening regulations around the prescribing of pain medications.

This intermediate-level course reviews the pharmacology of analgesic agents and updates the participant on current guidelines and therapeutic choices in order to optimize analgesic prescribing practices.  It also discusses the differences among analgesics typically prescribed for orofacial pain.  Along with this, the course also addresses the selection and timing of appropriate medications for special populations including the pregnant and breast-feeding patient, and patients with significant allergy histories.  Since the goal of analgesic therapy is to assure selection of the right drug at the right time and at the right dose, for the right patient and the right procedure, this course presents information that should be considered essential for all OHCPs, both seasoned and newly credentialed. 

AGD Subject Code: 344

Western Schools designates this activity for 1 continuing education credit.

This course is an extraction of, and should not be taken in conjunction with, Three Drug Classes Every Dental Professional Should Know: Antibiotics, Analgesics, and Anesthetics (L0726)

Three Drug Classes Every Dentist Should Know: Antibiotics, Analgesics, and Local Anesthetics - Module III: Local Anesthetics

Price: $9.95 Hours:1 Contact Hour
Item # L0725  

Release Date: February 17, 2016

Expiration Date: February 16, 2019

Oral healthcare professionals (OHCPs) are routinely involved with the selection and administration of local anesthetics to address patient discomfort during dental procedures. Patient discomfort as it relates to orofacial pain has both physiological and psychological components. Unfortunately, an experience of discomfort related to dentistry can lead patients to avoid or postpone treatment, making these patients more difficult to treat and less likely to comply with future appointments or oral healthcare treatment planning. Local anesthetics administered preoperatively help mitigate pain and improve patient comfort as well as clinical outcomes, making them an integral part of dental practice. The variety of local anesthetics available, whether as a plain solution or combined with a vasoconstrictor, offer unique pharmacological properties allowing the practitioner to tailor the individualized therapy and match the best drug to the specific patient and clinical situation.

The majority of dental pain or discomfort is acute in nature and typically accompanied by tissue injury or inflammation. While this pain can resolve spontaneously once the underlying cause is definitively treated (i.e., inflamed pulp, carious lesion, or abscessed gingiva), a pharmacological approach to pain management is considered the standard of care. Local anesthetics administered preoperatively help mitigate pain and improve patient comfort to allow for the dental procedure to proceed. Excellent intraoperative pain control with the appropriate selection and dose of local anesthesia, especially when combined with excellent postoperative analgesic medication selection will enhance successful outcomes for both the OHCP and patient.

This intermediate-level course reviews the pharmacology of local anesthetic agents and presents current guidelines and therapeutic choices to optimize prescribing practices.  Because the goal of local anesthetic therapy is to ensure selection of the right drug at the right time and at the right dose, for the right patient and the right procedure, the information presented in this course should be considered essential knowledge for both seasoned and newly credentialed OHCPs.

AGD Subject Code: 344

Western Schools designates this activity for 1 continuing education credit.

This course is an extraction of, and should not be taken in conjunction with, Three Drug Classes Every Dental Professional Should Know: Antibiotics, Analgesics, and Anesthetics (L0726)

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