Disciplines:
  • Social Work
  • Psychology
Hours: 10 Contact Hours
Item#: BGQYT

Youth Bundle


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Just $66.95
Item # BGQYT
When available, the Online Course format is included with the hard copy, eBook, or audio book formats!

This product includes the following courses:
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Counseling Adolescents With Substance Use Disorders, Updated 1st Edition

Price: $19.95 
Item # B4174  

Release Date: January 24, 2017

Expiration Date: December 31, 2020

Life transitions such as adolescence are key risk periods for substance abuse. Therefore, substance use assessment and intervention are particularly critical for adolescents. Substance abuse counseling of adolescents is different from that of adults given adolescents’ distinctively different developmental stages and environments. In addition, the trends of adolescent substance abuse change according to the geographic region, cultural influences, and availability of substances. Participants will learn about evidence-based screening tools that are recommended for use with adolescents who may be using substances. 

The course presents a treatment plan development process that is commonly used in outpatient clinics. Counseling approaches must consider the physical, mental, emotional, social, cultural, cognitive, and behavioral aspects of the adolescent. Group work is particularly effective with adolescents because of peer group influences; the inclusion of 12-step models and groups modeled on Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is useful. The course describes other treatment approaches including abstinence versus harm reduction, motivational interviewing, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and family therapy. The course explains the continuum of care for substance-abusing youth, including prevention, outreach, therapeutic communities, and halfway houses. The course briefly discusses coexisting disorders in an adolescent client with a substance use disorder: These can include conduct disorder, anxiety disorders, trauma and stressor related disorders, bipolar disorder, depression, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. This basic-level course is intended for social workers, mental health counselors, substance abuse counselors, marriage and family therapists, psychologists, and advanced practice and psychiatric nurses who work with youth populations.

  • Social Workers participating in this course will receive 2 (clinical) continuing education clock hours upon successful course completion.Accreditations
  • Psychologists will receive 2 CE credits upon successfully completing this course. APA Approval

New Jersey Social Workers – This course is approved by the Association of Social Work Boards - ASWB NJ CE Course Approval Program Provider #52 Course #1858 from 05/03/2018 to 05/03/2020. Social workers will receive the following type and number of credit(s): Clinical Social Work Practice 2

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe developmental and contextual considerations critical to treating adolescents who abuse substances.
  • Identify pertinent assessment data and mechanisms for gathering such data.
  • Explain the most effective modes of intervention for adolescents with substance use disorders.  
  • Discuss documenting individualized treatment plans for adolescents with substance use disorders.
Author Bio(s)

Lori K. Holleran Steiker, PhD, CISW, ACSW, an addictions therapist for more than 12 years, is currently an associate professor at the University of Texas at Austin School of Social Work. During her doctoral program at Arizona State University in Tempe, she transitioned to research on adolescent substance abuse and prevention. She helped design and evaluate the model Drug Resistance Strategies Project’s “Keepin’ It REAL” curriculum and is currently working on a study of culturally grounded adaptations of that curriculum for high risk youth in community settings. Dr. Holleran Steiker has a K01, or Mentored Research Scientist Development Award, from the National Institute on Drug Abuse.  She is the recent recipient of the Deborah K. Padgett Early Career Achievement Award given by the Society for Social Work and Research. She is co-editor of a book titled Substance Abusing Latinos.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Kelly Cue Davis, PhD, is a research assistant professor in the School of Social Work at the University of Washington in Seattle, WA. She obtained her master’s and doctoral degrees in clinical psychology from the University of Washington. Her current research focuses on the effects of alcohol consumption on sexuality, sexual aggression, sexual risk-taking, and violence against women. Most recently, she has studied the effects of alcohol use on sexual violence and HIV/STI-related risk behaviors under grants from the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Dr. Davis serves as a consulting editor for Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, ad hoc reviewer for numerous psychology journals, and chair of the Task Force on Violence Against Women, Society for the Psychology of Women of the American Psychological Association.

Youth Suicide, Updated 1st Edition

Price: $34.95 
Item # B4263  

Release Date: December 19, 2017

Expiration Date: December 19, 2020

Suicide and suicidal behaviors affect individuals, families, and communities, and addressing youth suicide has become a public health imperative. This intermediate-level course provides essential information on the tools needed to assess youth for suicide risk and to engage in interventions with these youth across various settings. Learners will become aware of 10 myths about youth suicide, which too often dictate how adults interact with youth who may be at heightened risk for suicide, both in public and in clinical practice. Four prominent theories of suicide are described: Durkheim’s sociological theory of suicide, Shneidman’s theory of the suicidal mind, Joiner’s interpersonal theory of suicide, and the family systems theory of suicide. Suicide risk factors are discussed, including psychiatric diagnoses, family and social factors, sexual minority status (individuals self-identified as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender), bullying, and demographic factors like age, gender, race, and ethnicity.

Participants will learn about assessment approaches and treatment planning. A decision-making tree and safety planning and documentation protocols are provided.  The course reviews the use of psychopharmacology and of psychotherapies such as dialectical behavior therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, and attachment-based family therapy. A particular focus is placed on brief interventions that can be applied across multiple settings. Presentations of case vignettes illuminate key concepts for the various interventions. Special mention is given to clinicians who experience the loss of a patient to suicide. This course is designed for behavioral health specialists, including social workers, mental health counselors, marriage and family therapists, and psychologists.

  • Social Workers participating in this course will receive 4 (clinical) continuing education clock hours upon successful course completion. Accreditations
  • Psychologists will receive 4 CE credits upon successfully completing this course. APA Approval

New Jersey Social Workers – This course is approved by the Association of Social Work Boards - ASWB NJ CE Course Approval Program Provider #52 Course #1866 from 05/03/2018 to 05/03/2020. Social workers will receive the following type and number of credit(s): Clinical Social Work Practice 4

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Differentiate myths from facts related to youth suicide.
  • Describe relevant terminology and theories of youth suicide.
  • Describe risk factors, warning signs, and protective factors related to suicide in youth.
  • Describe how to assess youth who may be at risk for suicide.
  • Explain various interventions to manage youth experiencing suicidal ideation and other risk factors for suicide.
Author Bio(s)

Edward A. Selby, PhD, is an associate professor and director of clinical training in the clinical psychology program at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey. Dr. Selby’s extensive research and clinical experience has sought to improve understanding and treatment of suicidal behavior, personality disorders, and eating disorders. He has written more than 70 peer-reviewed scientific articles and book chapters, and he was named a “Rising Star” in 2015 by the Association for Psychological Science. Much of his work is aimed at understand­ing the emotional experiences related to suicidal behavior, as well as the factors among different psychiatric disorders that increase risk for suicidal behavior. Dr. Selby’s research has been funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, and the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies. Dr. Selby is a licensed practitioner and has been trained extensively in major treatments for suicidal behavior and crisis intervention, including cognitive behavior therapy and mindfulness-based interventions.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Thomas E. Joiner, Jr., PhD, received his doctoral degree in clinical psychology from the University of Texas at Austin. He is Robert O. Lawton Distinguished Professor of Psychology at Florida State University–Tallahassee. Dr. Joiner’s work focuses on the psychology, neurobiology, and treatment of suicidal behavior and related conditions. Author of more than 475 peer-reviewed publications, Dr. Joiner has been awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship and the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Residency Fellowship for his work on suicidal behavior in clients. He has received numerous awards, including the Young Investigator Grant from the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression, the Edwin S. Shneidman Award for excellence in suicide research from the American Association of Suicidology, and research grants from the National Institute of Mental Health, Department of Defense, and various foundations. He is editor of the American Psychological Association’s Clinician’s Research Digest, editor of the Journal of Social & Clinical Psychology, and editor in chief of the journal Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior. He has authored or edited 17 books.iewe

Treating the Mental Health Needs of Children Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence, 2nd Edition

Price: $34.95 
Item # B4237  

Release Date: November 28, 2016

Expiration Date: November 28, 2019

Recent studies on intrafamilial violence indicate that a significant percentage of American children are exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV) and family violence, and as a result, experience negative outcomes well into adulthood and are in need of mental health services. Helping professionals are likely to encounter clients who have experienced IPV and children who have been exposed to family violence.

This intermediate-level course discusses the detrimental effects of IPV on child witnesses, the complex issues and negative sequelae that accompany exposure to IPV, and their impact on the mental health needs of children. Participants will learn about identifying exposure to IPV and reporting cases to child protective services. Case scenarios throughout the course illuminate how clients may present and appropriate responses from helping professionals.

The course discusses internalizing and externalizing behaviors of children exposed to IPV, and trauma symptoms are explored in terms of attachment, biological processes, cognition, affect regulation, dissociation, behavioral control, and self-concept. Clinicians will also learn about countertransferential reactions, vicarious traumatization, and clinician self-care. The course is designed for social workers, mental health counselors, marriage and family therapists, and psychologists working with children and families in various settings.

  • Social Workers will receive 4 (clinical) continuing education clock hours upon successfully completing this course. Accreditations
  • Psychologists will receive 4 CE credits upon successfully completing this course. APA Approval

New Jersey Social Workers – This course is approved by the Association of Social Work Boards - ASWB NJ CE Course Approval Program Provider #52 Course #1860 from 05/03/2018 to 05/03/2020. Social workers will receive the following type and number of credit(s): Clinical Social Work Practice 4

Florida - This course does not fulfill your domestic violence requirement. See Course B4238

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe intimate partner violence (IPV) and risk factors for victims and perpetrators.
  • Explain the influence of cultural issues on IPV disclosure.
  • Identify the possible detrimental effects of exposure to IPV on a child.
  • Explain treatment protocols, assessments, and interventions when working with children and families exposed to IPV.
  • Identify self-care strategies for clinicians working with children and families exposed to IPV.
Author Bio(s)

 

Kathleen Monahan, DSW, LCSW, LMFT, CFC, received an MSW from Columbia University in 1982 and a doctorate in social welfare from Adelphi University in 1994. She was a postdoctoral fellow (1994-1996) in the psychology department at the State University of New York at Stony Brook (now Stony Brook University) in a National Institute of Mental Health program, studying the effects of family violence with Dr. Daniel O’Leary. Dr. Monahan joined the faculty of the School of Social Welfare at Stony Brook University in 1996 as assistant professor and became associate professor in 2000. She is the founder (1998) and director of the Family Violence Education and Research Center (FVERC) at the School of Social Welfare. In 2010, she was appointed associate dean of the FVERC. Dr. Monahan is a licensed clinical social worker, a licensed marriage and family therapist, and a certified forensic consultant. She has been in private practice since 1984. As a traumatologist, Dr. Monahan works with individuals who have experienced childhood sexual abuse, domestic violence, and severe trauma. She has provided therapy and clinical  supervision/consultation at several domestic violence shelters on Long Island, including the Half Hollow Hills Clinic at the Sagamore Children’s Psychiatric Center in Dix Hills, New York. Dr. Monahan is a national and international lecturer on the topics of child abuse and trauma and is a clinical consultant, expert witness, and forensic consultant.

Justin Russotti, MSW, LMSW, ACS, received an MSW from the University of Southern California and a bachelor of arts degree in psychology from the State University of New York. He is in the process of completing a doctoral degree in counseling. Justin co-facilitates Delphi’s RESPECT batterer intervention program and, through Resolve of Greater Rochester, developed a curriculum that initiates discussion around intimate partner violence with high school and college students. Justin also works as a research project director, coordinator, and therapist at Mt. Hope Family Center, where he is examining the effects of maltreatment in young children and the efficacy of various treatment models designed to address childhood trauma exposure.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Betsy McAlister Groves, MSW, LICSW, received an MSW from Boston University School of Social Work and a bachelor’s degree in sociology from the College of William and Mary. She is the founding director of the Child Witness to Violence Project, and from 2000-2011 was co-director of the Child Protection Team, both of which function within the department of pediatrics at Boston Medical Center. The Child Witness to Violence Project provides developmentally informed, trauma-focused intervention to young children and their parents who are affected by violence and other traumas. Ms. Groves is an associate professor of pediatrics at Boston University School of Medicine and adjunct lecturer at Harvard University Graduate School of Education. She serves on the National Advisory Commission of the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Violence Against Women and on the Massachusetts Governor’s Commission on Sexual and Domestic Violence. In addition, Ms. Groves has served in advisory and consultative capacities for the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges and the American Academy of Pediatrics. Her practice and research interests focus on the impact of community and family violence on young children, and on engaging community systems in identifying and responding to children who are affected by violence in their environments. She has published and presented extensively on topics related to childhood trauma and intervention.

Laura Gibson, MSW, PhD, LCSW, has been practicing clinical social work for more than 18 years. She earned a bachelor of science degree in psychology from Bridgewater State College (now Bridgewater State University), a master’s degree in social work from the University of Southern Indiana, and a doctor of philosophy degree in social work from the University of Louisville. Dr. Gibson is a licensed clinical social worker in both Indiana and Kentucky. She served as a targeted assessment specialist for the Department for Community Based Services (Owensboro, KY), focusing on the areas of substance abuse, mental health, domestic violence, and learning problems, and has provided mental health services to children in a variety of settings, including their homes, schools, and a psychiatric hospital. She is an item writer for the Association of Social Work Boards’ (ASWB) master’s-level licensing examination for social workers and is a former member of the ASWB Examination Committee. She is a book review editor for the Journal of Social Work Values and Ethics. Dr. Gibson is an assistant professor and the MSW program director for Brescia University in Owensboro, Kentucky.