Disciplines:

Social Work

Hours: 10 Contact Hours
Item#: BST10

 

DSM-5 Updates Bundle


Reg. Prices
Just $69.95
Item # BST10
When available, the Online Course format is included with the hard copy, eBook, or audio book formats!

This product includes the following courses:
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ADHD: Etiology and Treatment

Price: $19.95 
Item # B4236  

Release Date: November 25, 2016

Expiration Date: November 25, 2019

The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) has finally provided much needed clarity on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It is more important than ever that social workers and mental health professionals be prepared to treat ADHD throughout the lifespan. This intermediate-level course has been developed to educate social workers, counselors, psychologists, and marriage and family therapists, and to bring a deeper understanding to the research, diagnosis, and treatment of ADHD in individuals of all ages.

This course provides clinicians with a rich description of the disorder’s historical roots and evolution.  In addition to a comprehensive history, the course describes contemporary perspectives of ADHD along with the latest available research. From there, the etiology of ADHD and its genetic, biological, and environmental factors are explored and discussed. Multimodal treatment programs are crucial to addressing the symptoms of ADHD including the use of psychopharmacology, psychotherapy, and complementary and alternative treatments. These multimodal treatments are described in the course with attention paid to stimulant and non-stimulant medications, and cognitive-behavioral therapies.  Case scenarios throughout the course illuminate the presentations of ADHD and various treatments options.

  • Social Workers participating in this course will receive 2 (clinical) continuing education clock hours upon successful course completion. Accreditations
  • Psychologists will receive 2 CE credits upon successfully completing this course. APA Approval

New Jersey Social Workers - This course is approved by the Association of Social Work Boards - ASWB NJ CE Course Approval Program Provider #52 Course #1460 from 5/31/2017 to 5/31/2019. Social workers will receive the following type and number of credit(s): Clinical Social Work Practice 2.

New York Social Workers - This course does NOT meet the NY Social Work Board's criteria for acceptable continuing education

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Discuss the historical evolution into modern-day perspectives and understanding of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
  • Describe the etiology of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
  • Explain treatment strategies for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
Author Bio(s)

 

Roberta Waite, EdD, APRN, CNS-BC, FAAN, is a tenured associate professor and serves as the assistant dean of academic integration and evaluation of community programs at Drexel University in Philadelphia. She is a graduate of Widener University (BSN) and the University of Pennsylvania (MSN). She also earned a doctorate in higher education administration-leadership from Widener University and completed a 2-year postdoctoral research fellowship (T32) at the Center for Health Disparities Research at the University of Pennsylvania. In 2011, the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation awarded Dr. Waite with the title of Macy’s Faculty Scholar. Her clinical scholarly work focuses on help-seeking behaviors and treatment engagement, with particular interest in depression, adult AD/HD, and trauma and adversity among diverse populations.

Meghan S. Leahy, MS, NCC, is a certified counselor and the founder and director of Leahy Learning in Wynnewood, PA. She is a graduate of St. Joseph’s University (BA) and Villanova University (MS). Her clinical work focuses on problemsolving and success strategies with a particular interest in education, counseling, learning disabilities, ADHD, and autism spectrum disorders. Ms. Leahy helps clients and their families to understand these experiences, their effects inside and outside of the classroom, and the implementation of successful strategies as both modes of prevention and response. Ms. Leahy has worked as a clinical associate in the Adult ADHD Treatment and Research Program in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania. She also provides consultation and training to schools, universities, and corporations and has spoken on a variety of topics in education and mental health in both the United States and the United Kingdom.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Patricia O. Quinn, MD, is a developmental pediatrician in the Washington, DC, area. A graduate of the Georgetown University Medical School, she specializes in child development and psychopharmacology. Dr. Quinn has worked for more than 30 years in the areas of ADD (ADHD) and learning disabilities. She gives workshops nationwide and has appeared on several network television shows discussing the issue of girls and women with ADD, along with authoring several books on the topic of ADHD. In 2000, Dr. Quinn received the CHADD Hall of Fame Award for her outstanding service to the field of ADHD.

Binge Eating Disorder: Clinical Implications and Considerations, Updated 1st Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # B4265  

Release Date: July 10, 2017

Expiration Date: July 10, 2020

Many people experience episodes during which they consume extremely large amounts of food over a short period of time while simultaneously feeling an inability to control their eating or stop. These experiences are referred to as binge eating episodes or binge episodes. Although binge episodes can be a symptom of multiple psychological disorders, frequent episodes of binge eating that are not a result of these other disorders are a separate diagnosis - binge eating disorder (BED) - in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5); American Psychiatric Association [APA], 2013). BED is linked to multiple health problems for the individual, including poor physical health and impaired psychological and social functioning.

Because many professionals working in clinical settings are unfamiliar with the specific diagnostic criteria or clinical considerations for BED, it is commonly misdiagnosed as another eating disorder, such as bulimia nervosa, anorexia nervosa, or eating disorder not otherwise specified. However, the treatment approaches for BED can differ from those used for other eating disorders and such a misdiagnosis could affect the course of treatment and treatment success for a client.

This basic-level course is designed for healthcare professionals in various clinical practice settings including psychologists, social workers, marriage and family therapists, and mental health counselors who may come into contact with individuals exhibiting BED. This course provides information to help clinicians better identify and treat individuals with the disorder. This course provides the most current information about BED, including material on the differential diagnosis of BED from related disorders, potential causes of BED, associated features of BED, negative health implications of BED, and pharmacological and psychological options for treating BED in various settings.

  • Social Workers participating in this course will receive 3 (clinical) continuing education clock hours upon successful course completion. Accreditations
  • Psychologists will receive 3 CE credits upon successfully completing this course. APA Approval

New Jersey Social Workers - This course is approved by the Association of Social Work Boards - ASWB NJ CE Course Approval Program Provider #52 Course #1867 from 05/03/2018 to 05/03/2020. Social workers will receive the following type and number of credit(s): Clinical Social Work Practice 3

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Explain the characteristics of binge eating disorder (BED).
  • Differentiate BED from other medical and psychological disorders, including related eating disorders, based on diagnostic criteria and assessment protocols.
  • Describe the factors that contribute to the development of BED, the proposed functions of bingeing behavior, and the health consequences of the disorder.
  • Identify different treatment approaches for BED and the ideal setting for the implementation of a specific intervention.
  • Explain the challenges in the treatment of BED and potential solutions.
Author Bio(s)

 

Edward A. Selby, PhD, is an assistant professor in the clinical psychology program at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey. Dr. Selby’s extensive research and clinical experience has sought to improve our understanding and treatment of suicidal behavior, eating disorders, and personality disorders. He has written more than 70 peer-reviewed scientific articles and book chapters, many of which examine binge eating. In 2015, he was named a “Rising Star” by the Association for Psychological Science. Much of Dr. Selby’s work is aimed at under­standing the emotional experiences that precede the onset of a binge episode, as well as the negative emotional and social consequences that result from such behavior. Dr. Selby’s research has been funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, and the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies. Dr. Selby has been extensively trained in major treatments for binge eating behavior, includ­ing cognitive behavior therapy, dialectical behavior therapy, and mindfulness-based interventions. Dr. Selby’s recent work has expanded to include developing new treatments for emotional and behavioral problems, including binge eating, employing smartphones for daily digital assessment.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Karen R. Koenig, LCSW, Med, has been treating clients with dysregulated eating for 30 years. She is the author of six books on eating and weight, including several foreign language editions. Her articles have appeared in Social Work Focus, Social Work Today, and Eating Disorders Today. A founding member of the Greater Boston Collaborative for Body Image and Eating Disorders, Ms. Koenig has served on the professional advisory board of the Massachusetts Eating Disorder Association and has taught seminars for the Simmons College School of Social Work, the Boston University School of Social Work, the Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology, the National Association of Social Work, the Massachusetts Dietetic Association, and the National Organization for Women. A graduate of Simmons College School of Social Work, Ms. Koenig practices in Sarasota, Florida.

Asperger's Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorders: DSM-5 Changes and Treatment, Updated 1st Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # B4178  

Expiration Date: December 31, 2018

This course is designed to help professionals recognize and work with the symptoms of Asperger's syndrome.  The DSM-5 subsumed Asperger’s syndrome into the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder; however, there are special qualities to Asperger’s syndrome that helping professionals may be called upon to identify when assisting in the acquistion of social and other skills sets.  This course is packed with information that professionals will find extremely important in the identification, assessment, and treatment of Asperger’s syndrome; many of the intervention techniques described are also useful in work with children and adults who have autism spectrum disorder. 

The course describes the unique history of the Asperger’s syndrome diagnosis and various theories about causality.  Using case scenarios, the course offers various symptom presentations across the lifespan, which highlight the importance of thorough assessment and individualized treatment interventions. Screening tools and assessment tools are described. The course details numerous treatment interventions for varying areas of difficulty that individuals experience, such as executive function, social interaction, intense and narrow interests, sensory processing, communication (nonverbal skills and pragmatic skills), mental health, theory of mind, and learning style. Interventions that are discussed include cognitive approaches, peer-mediated intervention programs, group interventions, family therapy, and sibling groups. The course describes in detail how such interventions are used to help individuals develop adaptive skills, including life skills such as personal hygiene and time management. The development of relationship and social skills is also discussed, such as social perception and social problem solving, emotional reciprocity, and knowledge of social norms. The course describes family systems issues related to the diagnosis, such as grief and emotional difficulties. Special considerations for females with Asperger’s syndrome are provided. 

This basic-level course is intended for social workers, mental health counselors, marriage and family therapists, psychologists, and nurses. However, the course will benefit other professionals who may have a client with Asperger’s syndrome, including physical and occupational therapists, speech and language pathologists, psychiatrists, pediatricians or other medical doctors, paraprofessionals, administrators, and teachers. An extensive resources section is provided at the end of the course to further participants' work with clients who have Asperger's syndrome

  • Social Workers will receive 3 (clinical) continuing education clock hours upon successfully completing this course. Accreditation

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Discuss the history and prevalence of Asperger’s syndrome.
  • Describe causal theories with respect to Asperger’s syndrome.
  • Discuss diagnostic constructs for Asperger’s syndrome.
  • Describe the evaluation and assessment of Asperger’s syndrome.
  • Explain the associated characteristics of Asperger’s syndrome.
  • Explain interventions that effectively support people with Asperger’s syndrome.
Author Bio(s)

Lauren H. Kerstein, LCSW, received a master’s degree in social work from the George Warren Brown School of Social Work at Washington University in St. Louis, MO. She is a licensed clinical social worker in private practice in Denver, CO, where she has worked with children, adolescents, adults, and families for more than 15 years. Ms. Kerstein specializes in working with children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders. She also works with children experi­encing anxiety; depression; social difficulties; divorce; and other adjustment, developmental, and mental health issues. Ms. Kerstein is the author of My Sensory Book: Working Together to Explore Sensory Issues and the Big Feelings They Can Cause: A Workbook for Parents, Professionals, and Children. Ms. Kerstein is also the author of A Week of Shifting, Switching, and Stretching: How to Make My Thinking More Flexible. Additionally, Ms. Kerstein has contributed articles to Expert Beacon, SensorySpot, and The Autism Notebook.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Tana Hope, PhD, is assistant director of the Child and Family Therapy Clinic in the Behavioral Psychology Department of the Kennedy Krieger Institute. She is also an instructor in the Department of Psychiatry at The Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine. Dr. Hope received her PhD from Louisiana State University in 2001. She completed her pre-doctoral internship training at the Kennedy Krieger Institute and Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, MD. Dr. Hope is a clinical psychologist with special interest in the application of empirically supported treatments including behavioral, cognitive behavioral, solution-focused, and structural family therapy treatments for children and adolescents. Her primary clinical and research interests include working with children diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome, anxiety, depression, and reactive attachment disorder; and the identification of variables influencing differential diagnosis and efficacy of treatment.

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: An Overview, 2nd Edition

Price: $19.95 
Item # B4279  

Release Date: May 1, 2018

Expiration Date: May 1, 2021

While most individuals who experience traumatic stressors do not develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the high incidence of trauma exposure in the United States requires routine assessment of exposure to a single traumatic event, ongoing traumatic experiences, and symptoms of PTSD.

This intermediate-level course presents an interesting history of the diagnosis, provides current information on assessment approaches, and details effective treatment methods. The role of risk and resiliency factors, as well trauma-informed care are discussed. The course includes a discussion on special considerations for different populations, case examples, and an extensive resource list.

  • Social Workers participating in this course will receive 2 (clinical) continuing education clock hours upon successful course completion. Accreditations
  • Psychologists will receive 2 CE credits upon successfully completing this course. APA Approval

New York Social Workers - This course does NOT meet the NY Social Work Board's criteria for acceptable continuing education.

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the history, incidence, and etiology for PTSD.
  • Recognize risk and resiliency factors in the development of PTSD.
  • Explain trauma informed care.
  • Describe screening, assessment, differentials, and special considerations for diagnosing PTSD.
  • Explain PTSD treatment approaches and clinician self-care strategies.
Author Bio(s)

Michelle Pardee, DNP, FNP-BC, is a family nurse practitioner (FNP) and clinical assistant professor at the University of Michigan School of Nursing. Dr. Pardee is the program lead for the FNP program and coordinator of academic programs in the Department of Health Behavior & Biological Sciences. She received her doctor of nursing practice degree from Wayne State University, where her doctoral project was a policy analysis of Michigan’s maternal-infant health program. Dr. Pardee has more than 20 years of clinical experience as an FNP in adolescent health, providing care to underserved and at-risk youth, including runaway and homeless persons. In addition to her aca­demic position, she currently provides health care at a grant-funded, school-linked health center. Dr. Pardee is a member of the Complex ACEs, Complex Aid (CASCAID) Nursing Study Group at the University of Michigan School of Nursing. Her work includes conducting research on adverse childhood experiences, developing assessments and interventions for youth with a high level of adverse childhood experiences, and increasing trauma-informed education across nursing curriculums.

Justin Russotti, MSW, LSW, ACS, received an MSW from the University of Southern California and a bachelor of arts degree in psy­chology from the State University of New York. He is in the process of completing a doctoral degree in counseling. Justin co-facilitates Delphi’s RESPECT batterer intervention program and, through Resolve of Greater Rochester, developed a curriculum that initiates discus­sion around intimate partner violence with high school and college students. Justin also works as a research project director, coordinator, and therapist at Mt. Hope Family Center, where he is examining the effects of maltreatment in young children and the efficacy of various treatment models designed to address childhood trauma exposure.

Kelly Cue Davis, PhD, is an associate professor in the College of Nursing and Health Innovation at Arizona State University in Phoenix, AZ. She obtained her master’s and doctoral degrees in clinical psychology from the University of Washington. Her current research focuses on the effects of alcohol consumption on sexuality, sexual aggression, sexual risk-taking, and violence against women. Most recently, she has studied the effects of alcohol use on sexual violence and HIV/sexually transmitted infection (STI)-related risk behaviors under grants from the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Davis serves as an Associate Editor for Psychology of Violence and Psychology of Women Quarterly.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

David C. Rozek, PhD, is a clinical psychologist and holds a primary appointment at the University of Utah in the Department of Psychiatry, with a secondary appointment at the National Center for Veterans Studies. Dr. Rozek received his PhD from the University of Notre Dame and completed his residency at the Orlando Veterans Affairs Medical Center. His research and clinical expertise are in understanding and treating stress-related disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and suicide. Dr. Rozek regularly provides training to clinicians and medical professionals on cognitive- and behavioral-based treatments for these disorders and is an active researcher focusing on how to best improve clinical care.