Disciplines:
  • Social Work
  • Psychology
Hours: 9 Contact Hours
Item#: BGQ09

9-Hour Assessment and Ethics of Mental Health Bundle


Reg. Prices
Just $66.95
Item # BGQ09
When available, the Online Course format is included with the hard copy, eBook, or audio book formats!

This product includes the following courses:
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Ethics in Mental Health Treatment

Price: $29.95 
Item # B4130  

Expiration Date: December 31, 2018
 
Mental health professionals are charged with providing services in an ethical manner, where ethical means in accordance with professional principles and standards of behavior. Ethics are profession-centric and differ from values, which are person-centric, or morals, which are society-centric. Ethics define what is important to a profession or organization in how it conducts its business. Professional practices related to the delivery of mental health care are governed by various professional organizations, most of which are organized by practice discipline, academic degree, and/or license type. Each organization has developed a professional code of ethics and conduct by which its members are required to abide. Ethical codes include aspirational principles that describe the ethical ideals central to the organization’s mission, as well as mandatory ethics that set minimum requirements for acceptable and unacceptable behavior. Given the complexities of the human condition, it is not surprising that situations arise in providing mental health services that require the professional to make decisions based on competing ideals and principles. When a decision involves compromising one or more ethical standards, practitioners are faced with an ethical dilemma.

The information presented in this basic-level course applies to the ethical provision of mental health services to adults across a variety of practice settings such as outpatient community mental health clinics, private practice settings, and inpatient psychiatric care. The course is intended for social workers, mental health counselors, marriage and family therapists, and psychologists. This course contains information about the most recent codes of ethics for these professions.

  • Social Workers participating in this course will receive 3 (ethics) continuing education clock hours upon successful course completion. Accreditations
  • Psychologists will receive 2 CE credits upon successfully completing this course. APA Approval

New Jersey Social Workers - This course is approved by the Association of Social Work Boards - ASWB NJ CE Course Approval Program Provider #52 Course #1353 from 3/21/2017 to 3/21/2019. Social workers will receive the following type and number of credit(s): Ethics, 3.

Disclosures
  • You must pass the final exam with a grade of 75% or higher and complete the course evaluation to earn contact hours and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this activity have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to this activity.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the core ethical principles of professional mental health practice.
  • Identify effective strategies for ethical decision making.
  • Explain standards for professional conduct.
  • Differentiate between ethical and unethical behavior.
  • Describe ethical issues related to mental health treatment and service delivery.

 

Author Bio(s)

Philip J. Osteen, MSW, PhD, is an assistant professor at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, School of Social Work, where he has taught master’s- and doctoral-level courses since 2008. He has more than 20 years of experience in community mental health and public health. He received his graduate-level education at the University of Denver, earning an MSW in 1998 and dual doctoral degrees in social work and quantitative research methods in 2009. Dr. Osteen received the Dean’s Teaching Award from the University of Maryland School of Social Work for five consecutive years and was recognized by the Spina Bifida Association, which granted him an award for best original new research. He was also the recipient of the Council on Social Work Education 2012 best empirical article for his work on personal and professional values. Dr. Osteen has been the principal investigator for research projects examining multicultural social work education and suicide prevention training. His extensive research activity and publications have focused on the intersection of social work and healthcare, suicide risk, and research methodologies.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Nancy L. Sidell, PhD, is a professor and program director of the social work program at Mansfield University, Mansfield, PA, where she has served on the faculty since 1998. She is also an adjunct instructor in the MSW program at Temple University’s Mansfield Program in Harrisburg, PA. Dr. Sidell received her MSW in 1990 from Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, and her doctorate in social work in 1998 from The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH. She is an item development consultant for the Association of Social Work Boards, where she helps develop practice content on licensing examinations, including ethical issues. The author of books on social work documentation and professional communication skills, Dr. Sidell has had numerous articles on social work education and practice published in peer-reviewed journals. She has written on a broad range of topics including rural social work, gerontology, and teaching methodology and has taught ethical issues in social work practice to students and practitioners.

Clinical Neuropsychology: Applications in Practice, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # B4230  

Release Date: July 11, 2016

Expiration Date: July 11, 2019

Clinical neuropsychology is a field that combines skills and perspectives from neurobiology, clinical psychology, neuropsychiatry, and behavioral neurology. This informative and practical course discusses what happens during a typical neuropsychological evaluation, how and when to make a referral to a neuropsychologist, and how to read a neuropsychological report. The functional organization of the brain is clearly described with accompanying illustrations that are useful for clients and practitioners. The discussion of neuroanatomy includes the brainstem, cerebellum, cerebral hemispheres, hypothalamus and thalamus, limbic system, and cerebral cortex. Brain circuitry is described, including the language circuit and brain damage. Participants will learn about the components of a neuropsychological evaluation, such as reviewing patient records; conducting a clinical interview; selecting, administering, scoring, and interpreting tests; making behavioral observations; writing reports; providing feedback; and educating clients, families, and other team members.

This intermediate-level course describes the etiology, course, and prevalence of common disorders across the lifespan and discusses their diagnosis, assessment, and treatment. The course discusses disorders in pediatric neuropsychology, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, specific learning disorders, autism spectrum disorder, and psychiatric comorbidities. Social workers, counselors, therapists, and psychologists who treat adults and geriatric patients will benefit from discussions of traumatic brain injury, multiple sclerosis, and Alzheimer’s disease.

  • Social Workers participating in this course will receive 3 (clinical) continuing education clock hours upon successful course completion. Accreditations

  • Psychologists will receive 3 CE credits upon successfully completing this course. APA Approval

New Jersey Social Workers – This course is approved by the Association of Social Work Boards - ASWB NJ CE Course Approval Program Provider #52 Course #1859 from 05/03/2018 to 05/03/2020. Social workers will receive the following type and number of credit(s): Clinical Social Work Practice 3

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Define clinical neuropsychology.
  • Discuss the historical development of the field of neuropsychology and the unique training requirements for clinical neuropsychologists.
  • Identify major neuroanatomical features of the brain and their functional significance.
  • Explain the core steps in clinical neuropsychological evaluations.
  • Describe common neuropsychological disorders in children and adolescents.
  • Describe common neuropsychological disorders in young and older adults.
Author Bio(s)

 

Rebecca E. Ready, PhD, ABPP-CN, is an associate professor, division head, and director of clinical training in the Department of Psychology at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst (UMass), and a member of the Umass Neuroscience and Behavior Program. Dr. Ready obtained her doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Iowa in 2001. Her predoctoral training was funded by a grant from the University of Iowa Center on Aging to study behavioral symptoms in neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease and Huntington’s disease. Dr. Ready completed her internship and two-year post-doctoral residency in neuropsychology at Brown University Medical School, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior. Her postdoctoral research training at Brown University was funded by a National Research Service Award from the National Institutes of Health to study quality of life in persons with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Ready completed another year of residency at the University of Pittsburgh, Department of Psychiatry, Late Life Mood Disorders Program, before beginning her current position at UMass. Dr. Ready runs an active research laboratory that studies changes in emotion and cognition in aging and in the context of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease and Huntington’s disease. She teaches advanced assessment courses to clinical psychology graduate students and supervises the neuropsychological assessments program in the UMass training clinic and the Psychological Services Center, and conducts neuropsychological assessments for a wide range of referral questions, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, learning disabilities, memory disorders, and concussion. She is a board-certified, licensed clinical neuropsychologist in Massachusetts.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Kathleen L. Fuchs, PhD, ABPP-CN, received her undergraduate degree from the University of California-San Diego. She earned her doctorate at the University of Houston and completed an internship in clinical psychology at the University of Chicago Medical Center. She then completed a postdoctoral fellowship in clinical neuropsychology at the University of Virginia. She is currently an associate professor of clinical neurology and is the neuropsychologist for the James Q. Miller Multiple Sclerosis Clinic at the University of Virginia. She is affiliated with the UVA Memory and Aging Care Clinic and is the director of postdoctoral training in neuropsychology within the Department of Neurology. She is board-certified in clinical neuropsychology and does cognitive assessments of young and older adults with neurologic disorders. Her specialty areas of clinical practice and research include multiple sclerosis, mild cognitive impairment, and cognitive/emotional sequelae of brain tumors.

A Clinician's Guide to DSM-5, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # B4281  

Release Date: October 11, 2018

Expiration Date: October 11, 2021

This intermediate-level course provides clinicians with the most essential information about the manual in a single, easy-to-use source. The course describes the history of the DSM and the development process used in creating the diagnostic system’s new structure. Newly added and classified disorders, removed or reclassified disorders, and any modified diagnostic criteria for those disorders retained in DSM-5 are detailed. The course addresses the controversies and criticisms that arose with the publication of DSM-5. Clinical vignettes highlight diagnosis criteria and quick reference lists and charts included in the course are an indispensable resource for those clinicians ready to use DSM-5.

 

  • Social Workers participating in this course will receive 2 (clinical) continuing education clock hours upon successful course completion. Accreditations
  • Psychologists will receive 2 CE credits upon successfully completing this course. APA Approval

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe the history of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM).
  • Explain the structure and organization of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5).
  • Recognize current psychiatric diagnoses within each diagnostic category of DSM-5, including new diagnoses and diagnoses that were recategorized or renamed or were modified from the previous edition.
  • List psychiatric disorders and their criteria that have been recommended for further study by the DSM-5.
  • Describe DSM-5 controversies and criticisms and proposed alternate diagnostic systems.
Author Bio(s)

Edward A. Selby, PhD, is the director of clinical training and an associate professor in the clinical psy­chology program at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey. Dr. Selby has sought, through extensive research and clinical experience, to improve the understanding and treatment of psychopathol­ogy. He has written more than 70 peer-reviewed scientific articles and book chapters, many of which examine various forms of psychopathology, including personality disorders and eating disorders. Much of his work is aimed at understanding the emotional experiences that precede the onset of maladaptive behaviors, such as nonsuicidal self-injury and binge-eating episodes, as well as the negative emotional and social consequences that result from such behavior. He and his colleagues have also been investiga­tors of and proponents for the inclusion of a nonsuicidal self-injury disorder in a future version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Dr. Selby’s research has been funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, and the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies. He was designated as a “Rising Star” by the Association for Psychological Science in 2015. Dr. Selby has been extensively trained in cognitive behavior therapy, dialectical behavior therapy, and mindfulness-based interventions. At Rutgers, Dr. Selby regularly teaches graduate-level and undergraduate-level courses on psychopathology and diagnostic assessment.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Elizabeth B. Russell, PhD, is an assistant professor of social work at the College of Brockport. Prior to her appointment at Brockport, she was a tenured associate professor at Nazareth College and the Greater Rochester Collaborative Master of Social Work Program. Dr. Russell teaches practice, psychopathology, research, and policy classes, as well as electives in sexual health, creativity in social work, evidence-based practice, and addictions. She is a licensed clinical social worker in New York State and maintains a small private practice working with adults. Dr. Russell has contributed to several books, written peer-reviewed articles, and presented her research both nationally and internationally. Her current research foci include women and low sexual desire, cultural humility in social work graduate programs, and sexual health in professional social work practice. She holds a Master of Social Work degree from the University of Michigan–Ann Arbor and a Doctor of Philosophy in Education and Counseling from the University of Rochester.