Disciplines:
  • Social Work
  • Counseling
  • Marriage and Family Therapy
  • Psychology
Hours: 7 Contact Hours
Item#: BGQ07

7-Hour Disaster Mental Health Bundle


Reg. Prices
Just $44.95
Item # BGQ07
When available, the Online Course format is included with the hard copy, eBook, or audio book formats!

This product includes the following courses:
Click on the title to see more and read the course

Psychosocial Aspects of Disaster, Updated 1st Edition

Price: $34.95 Hours:4 Contact Hours
Item # B4204  

This intermediate-level course provides information on the key factors associated with the psychosocial aspects of disasters and how these factors relate to social and psychological interventions provided by disaster mental health workers. The course discusses coping and community stress, disaster mental health protocols, types of individual stress reactions and their classification under DSM-5, the phases of disaster, and risk factors for ongoing distress. Intervention strategies and information on working with special populations are also included.

Participants will receive 3 (Clinical Content) continuing education clock hours upon successfully completing this course.

Click here for a list of supplemental references.

Framingham, J., & Teasley, M. L. (Eds.). (2012) Behavioral health response to disasters. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press. 

Kaniasty, K. (2012). Predicting social psychological well-being following trauma: The role of postdisaster social support. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 4(1), 22–33. Abstract retrieved from http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/tra/4/1/22/ 

McFarlane, A. C., & Williams, R. (2012). Mental health services required after disasters: Learning from the lasting effects of disasters. Depression Research and Treatment, 2012. doi:10.1155/2012/970194 

Miller, J. L. (2012). Psychosocial capacity building in response to disasters. New York, NY: Columbia University Press. 

Weems, C. F., & Graham, R. A. (2014). Resilience and trajectories of posttraumatic stress among youth exposed to disaster. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, 24(1), 2–8. Abstract retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24200122


 

Disaster Mental Health: Preparation, Training, and Practice, Updated 1st Edition

Price: $29.95 Hours:3 Contact Hours
Item # B4202  

The purpose of this basic-level course is to acquaint social workers, mental health counselors, marriage and family therapists and psychologists with the various aspects of training, assessment, and preparation for disaster with a focus on disaster mental health (DMH) practices in the United States. The course presents protocols for disaster response that consider the immediate concerns following a disaster, natural recovery patterns, and common challenges to recovery. The course describes psychological sequelae of disaster, including common traumatic stress reactions. Other sequelae described include acute stress disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, major depressive disorder, substance-related disorders, and anxiety disorders. Some common factors that predict a victim’s ongoing and future impairment following exposure to a disaster are described as well, although this is a continuing challenge that is not yet fully understood. A model of DMH is presented that resembles a triage system in which at-risk individuals are identified, assessed, and monitored through various stages, while those who appear to be recovering appropriately are provided with resources for additional care. The model includes general guidelines for DMH providers and describes self-care for providers. Participants will learn about the characteristics of successful DMH workers, qualifications, and training resources. Ethical concerns in DMH settings are described as well.

Participants will receive 3 (Clinical Content) continuing education clock hours upon successfully completing this course.

Click here for a list of supplemental references.

American Psychiatric Association. (2014). Disaster psychiatry. Retrieved from http://www.psychiatry.org/practice/professional-interests/disaster-psychiatry 

Boscarino, J. A., Hoffman, S. N., Adams, R. E., Figley, C. R., & Solhkhah, R. (2014). Mental health outcomes among vulnerable residents after Hurricane Sandy: Implications for disaster research and planning. American Journal of Disaster Medicine, 9(2), 107–120. Abstract retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25068940?tool=MedlinePlus 

Framingham, J., & Teasley, M. L. (Eds.). (2012) Behavioral health response to disasters. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press. 

Shallcross, L. (2012, February 1). A calming presence. Counseling Today. Retrieved from http://ct.counseling.org/2012/02/a-calming-presence/ 

Shaw, J. A., Espinel, Z., & Shultz, J. M. (2012). Care of children exposed to the traumatic effects of disaster. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Association. 

Weems, C. F., & Graham, R. A. (2014). Resilience and trajectories of posttraumatic stress among youth exposed to disaster. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, 24(1), 2–8. Abstract retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24200122