Disciplines:
  • Social Work
  • Psychology
Hours: 17 Contact Hours
Item#: BMQ17

17-Hour Mental Health Disorders Bundle


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Just $111.95
Item # BMQ17
When available, the Online Course format is included with the hard copy, eBook, or audio book formats!

This product includes the following courses:
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Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Signs, Symptoms, and Treatment

Price: $34.95 
Item # B4156  

Expiration Date: December 31, 2018

Mental health clinicians play an important role in helping children and adults with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) manage their symptoms and achieve an optimal level of functioning. This basic-level course discusses the OCD diagnosis, including subtypes of OCD and their symptoms. Numerous case vignettes are presented in the course to describe symptom manifestation, delineate subtypes, and demonstrate treatment methods.  

Participants will learn about the differential diagnosis, which can entail obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders, body sensation and appearance disorders, eating disorders, dissociative disorders, delusional disorders, impulse-control disorders and nonsuicidal self-injurious behaviors, and hoarding, among others. Causal and influential factors are described, including biological, psychological, social, and cross-cultural factors, and participants will learn about various assessment methods and tools. Treatment approaches such as medication, cognitive therapy, and family therapy are discussed, and the course describes relapse prevention and outcome evaluation. The details of a hypothetical client’s therapeutic process are presented throughout the course as a case study to illustrate the use of a multimodal approach to assist clients in their recovery and to maximize treatment outcomes. With the information learned in this course, the clinician ensures that the diagnosis is correct, develops realistic and manageable goals, and assists clients and families in symptom management so they can recover or improve their emotional, psychological, social, and occupational functioning. This course is written for mental health professionals, including social workers, counselors, marriage and family therapists, psychologists, and nurses.

  • Social Workers will receive 4 (Clinical Content) continuing education clock hours upon successfully completing this course. Accreditations

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Identify the symptoms and subtypes of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).
  • Distinguish between OCD and differential disorders.
  • Describe the causal and influential factors of OCD.
  • Describe the presentation of OCD across the lifespan.
  • Describe approaches for OCD assessment, treatment, and relapse prevention.
  • Explain ways to evaluate OCD treatment outcomes.
Author Bio(s)

Teresa Crowe, PhD, LCSWC, is a professor of social work at Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C. She received a BSW in 1987 from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County; an MSW from Gallaudet University in 1992; and a PhD from the School of Social Work at the University of Maryland at Baltimore in 2000. Dr. Crowe has worked in the mental health field for more than 25 years in inpatient, outpatient community centers, and private practice settings. In addition to teaching graduate-level social work students, Dr. Crowe works as a psychotherapist for a community service mental health agency that serves people with chronic mental illnesses. Her current publications and areas of research address the assessment of mental health needs in minority populations. Both Dr. Crowe’s therapeutic practice and her academic research have focused on individuals with chronic mental illnesses, including obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Leslie J. Shapiro, LICSW, is a behavioral therapist at the Massachusetts General Hospital Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Institute at McLean Hospital in Belmont, Massachusetts, where she provides cognitive-behavioral therapy treatment for people with refractory OCD and related disorders in residential, partial, and outpatient programs. Ms. Shapiro also maintains a private practice working with individuals presenting primarily with OCD and anxiety problems. She received her MSW in 1989 from Boston University and has been an instructor of cognitive and behavioral treatment at Boston University, a lecturer at Harvard Medical School, and was awarded a McLean Hospital Career Development Grant. Her research and publications have focused on scrupulosity and pathological guilt among residential patients with OCD.

Schizophrenia: Diagnosis and Treatment, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # B4223  

Release Date: February 26, 2016

Expiration Date: December 31, 2019

Mental health and mental illness are difficult concepts to define. Both health and illness have a basis in society’s cultural, moral, ethical, and spiritual beliefs, providing a wide framework for understanding. As difficult as it may be to arrive at a universal definition of mental illness, certain elements are associated with how mental illness is perceived regardless of one’s psychosocial heritage. Individuals in society evaluate another person’s health within a specific cultural context and by the comprehensibility of that person’s actions. Perhaps no other mental illness is as devastating and difficult to understand as schizophrenia. Affecting almost 1% of the population worldwide, the disorder knows no gender, ethnic, or cultural boundaries. For various reasons, mental illness has become increasingly visible. As society has advanced in medicine and technology, industrialization, urbanization, immigration, and globalization, the demand for healthcare services, and mental health services in particular, has greatly increased. It is estimated that  1 in 5 Americans has a diagnosable mental disorder. As a result, clinicians in a variety of practice settings are caring for clients with mental health issues and illnesses such as schizophrenia.

The purpose of this course is to provide the reader with an overview of schizophrenia, including its etiology, signs and symptoms, and treatment. Designed for social workers, mental health counselors, marriage and family therapists, and psychologists, this intermediate-level course will provide clinicians with current information under DSM-5 about schizophrenia and will suggest therapeutic interventions to assist them when working with clients who have schizophrenia.

  • Social Workers participating in this course will receive 3 (clinical) continuing education clock hours upon successful course completion. Accreditations

New Jersey Social Workers - This course is approved by the Association of Social Work Boards - ASWB NJ CE Course Approval Program Provider #52, Course #1169 from December 19, 2016 to December 19, 2018. Social Workers will receive the following type and Number of credit(s): Clinical SW Practice, 3 credits.

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content
  • Brandon Abbs has disclosed that he has a financial relationship with the following companies: Shire PLC, TESARO, Inc., Alkermes, Inc., and Seeking Alpha, a crowd-sourced content service for financial markets. Western Schools ensures that this content is free from bias and commercial influence through its peer-review process.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe schizophrenia, including the illness’s epidemiology and etiology
  • Describe the clinical presentation of clients diagnosed with schizophrenia
  • Explain treatment modalities used when working with clients who have schizophrenia
  • Identify relapse-prevention strategies
Author Bio(s)

Catherine Gilbert, EdD, RN, is currently a faculty member in the Department of Nursing at Armstrong Atlantic State University in Savannah, Georgia, and has more than 30 years of nursing experience. She has worked in mental health/psychiatric nursing for more than 25 years in inpatient and outpatient settings with patients experiencing acute and chronic mental illness, in forensic psychiatry, on crisis teams, and as a mental health therapist. She has been teaching mental health nursing to undergraduate and post-RN nursing students since 1991 and continues to work in the emergency department with the psychiatric crisis team performing emergency psychiatric evaluations.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Teresa Mason, PhD, LCSWC, is a professor of social work at Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C. She received her MSW from Gallaudet University in 1992 and her PhD from the School of Social Work at the University of Maryland at Baltimore in 2000. Dr. Mason’s clinical experience, as a program director, consultant, and psychotherapist, has focused on working with deaf adults who have a chronic mental illness. Her current publications and areas of research include domestic violence in the deaf community and the use of mental health instruments with deaf and hard-of-hearing people. Teresa Mason has disclosed that she has no significant financial or other conflicts of interest pertaining to this course book.

Brandon Abbs, PhD, is a medical writer in the biotechnology industry. Dr. Abbs received his doctorate in psychology from the University of Iowa in 2008 and completed a postdoctoral research fellowship at Harvard Medical School (Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Massachusetts General Hospital) in 2012. He has more than 15 years of clinical research experience in the field of cognition, decision making, and neuroscience. Dr. Abbs’s research is directed toward understanding how early life experiences and the developmental trajectories of individuals diagnosed with chronic mental illnesses affect their cognitive functioning. His research interests also include the role of the human stress response in mental illness, including the effects of chronic stress on human brain functioning.

Major Depression in Adults: Signs, Symptoms, and Treatment Strategies, 2nd Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # B4235  

Release Date: November 23, 2016

Expiration Date: November 23, 2019

Depressive disorders affect many people across a wide range of age, cultural, ethnic, racial, and socioeconomic groups, and clinicians need to be aware of the prevalence, different manifestations, symptoms, and effect on functioning among various populations. The purpose of this basic-level course is to educate social workers, counselors, marriage and family therapists, and psychologists about major depressive disorder and its distinctions so that the treatment team can provide the client with relief from symptoms and an improved sense of well-being. Participants will learn about the epidemiology of major depressive disorder and how to differentiate types of depression as described by the DSM-5, such as persistent depressive disorder (dysthymia), premenstrual dysphoric disorder, and substance- or medication-induced depressive disorder. Causal and influential factors are discussed, such as biological factors, psychological factors, social factors, and cultural considerations.

The course describes signs and symptoms of depression in adults (with a very brief overview of children and adolescents) and discusses clinical assessment, suicide assessment, and clinical diagnosis.  Assessment tools are described.  Participants will learn about treatment planning and the implementation of evidence-based practices. Current treatments are described, including biological treatments, such as psychopharmacology and electroconvulsive therapy; psychological treatments, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy and interpersonal therapy; and social interventions. Relapse prevention and the monitoring of client progress are discussed. A case scenario illuminates treatment and measuring outcomes through goal attainment scales and other forms of single-subject designs. 

  • Social Workers participating in this course will receive 3 (clinical) continuing education clock hours upon successful course completion. Accreditations
  • Psychologists will receive 3 CE credits upon successfully completing this course. APA Approval

New Jersey Social Workers -  This course is approved by the Association of Social Work Boards - ASWB NJ CE Course Approval Program Provider #52 Course #1459 from 5/31/2017 to 5/31/2019. Social workers will receive the following type and number of credit(s): Clinical Social Work Practice 3.

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Explain the epidemiology of depression.
  • Differentiate among the types of depressive disorders.
  • Recognize the symptoms and causal and influential factors of major depression.
  • Describe assessment and treatment approaches for major depression.
  • Describe outcome evaluation approaches.
Author Bio(s)

 

Teresa Mason, PhD, LCSWC, is a professor of social work at Gallaudet University in Washington, DC. She received a bachelor of social work (BSW) degree in 1987 from the University of Maryland, a master of social work (MSW) degree from Gallaudet University in 1992, and a doctorate from the School of Social Work at the University of Maryland at Baltimore in 2000. Dr. Mason has worked in the mental health field for more than 24 years, in inpatient, outpatient community centers, and private practice settings. Her clinical experience has focused on working with deaf adults who have a chronic mental illness, including those who have major depression. Her current publications and areas of research address the assessment of mental health needs in minority populations.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Kelly Cue Davis, PhD, is a licensed clinical psychologist and research associate professor in the School of Social Work at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington. Dr. Davis obtained her master’s and doctoral degrees in clinical psychology from the University of Washington, where her advanced training focused on the use of cognitive-behavioral therapies for mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders. Dr. Davis’s research focuses on the effects of alcohol consumption on sexual health and sexual violence, particularly through its effects on emotional and cognitive factors. Dr. Davis serves as an editor and as an ad hoc reviewer for numerous psychology journals.

Allison J. Applebaum, PhD, is an assistant attending psychologist and director of the Caregivers Clinic at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Dr. Applebaum received her doctorate in clinical psychology from Boston University and completed her clinical internship at New York Presbyterian Hospital/Weill-Cornell Medical Center. She has more than 10 years of clinical and research experience in the field of behavioral medicine. Dr. Applebaum’s research is directed toward promoting the psychological and physical well-being of individuals diagnosed with chronic medical illnesses. Her research interests also include the classification of mood disorders, including the nature and treatment of bipolar disorders and the bipolar spectrum.

Bipolar and Related Disorders: Signs, Symptoms, and Treatment Strategies, Updated 1st Edition

Price: $29.95 
Item # B4261  

Release Date: January 3, 2017

Expiration Date: January 3, 2020

Written for mental health professionals, including social workers, counselors, marriage and family therapists, and psychologists, this basic-level course presents essential information about bipolar and related disorders, including diagnostic information from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 5th Edition (DSM-5). Because of its health-related consequences, bipolar disorder is among the top 10 causes of disability worldwide. Using a holistic, multimodal approach, clinicians can help the client stabilize his or her mood and return to a normal level of functioning.

This course describes the symptoms and the biological, psychological, and social factors that must be considered when working with individuals who have bipolar disorder.  The course portrays two different fictional clients to highlight the various aspects of bipolar and related disorders, including their social and occupational impact, and describes elements of treatment that are particularly useful. This course discusses psychopharmacology, and participants will learn about indications for and side effects of typical medications used in the treatment of bipolar disorders, such as mood stabilizers, atypical antipsychotics, and antidepressants. The course describes how single-system design methodology is used for outcome evaluation, an important consideration in today’s environment of managed care and third-party payers. Relapse prevention is discussed, including medication adherence and individual therapy.

  • Social Workers will receive 3 (clinical) continuing education clock hours upon successfully completing this course. Accreditations
  • Psychologists will receive 3 CE credits upon successfully completing this course. APA Approval

New Jersey Social Workers - This course is approved by the Association of Social Work Boards - ASWB NJ CE Course Approval Program Provider #52 Course #1521 from 8/25/2017 to 8/25/2019. Social workers will receive the following type and number of credit(s): Clinical Social Work Practice 3

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Recognize the symptoms and types of bipolar disorders.
  • Describe causal and influential factors for bipolar disorder.
  • Identify assessment frameworks and diagnostic criteria for bipolar and related disorders.
  • Explain treatment approaches for bipolar disorder.
  • Describe ways to prevent relapse.
Author Bio(s)

Teresa Crowe, PhD, LCSWC, is department chair and a professor of social work at Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C. She received a bachelor of social work (BSW) degree in 1987 from the University of Maryland, a master of social work (MSW) degree from Gallaudet University in 1992, and a doctorate from the School of Social Work at the University of Maryland at Baltimore in 2000. Dr. Crowe has worked in the mental health field for more than 24 years, in inpatient and outpatient community centers, and in private practice settings. In addition to teaching graduate-level social work students, Dr. Crowe works as a psychotherapist for a community service mental health agency. Her current publications and areas of research address the assessment of mental health needs in minority populations. Both Dr. Crowe’s therapeutic practice and her academic research have focused on individuals with chronic mental illnesses, including bipolar disorder.

 

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Allison J. Applebaum, PhD, is an assistant attending psychologist and the director of the Caregivers Clinic in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC). Dr. Applebaum received her doctorate in clinical psychology from Boston University and completed her clinical internship at New York Presbyterian Hospital/Weill-Cornell Medical Center. She has more than 10 years of clinical and research experience in the field of behavioral medicine. Dr. Applebaum’s research is directed toward promoting the psychological and physical well-being of individuals diagnosed with chronic medical illnesses, including cancer and HIV, and improving the quality of life of their caregivers. Her research interests also include the classification and treatment of depression, anxiety, and the bipolar disorders. She is the author of numerous peer-reviewed papers and book chapters, including a chapter on “The Nature and Treatment of Bipolar Disorder and the Bipolar Spectrum” published by Oxford University Press. Dr. Applebaum has presented at national and international conferences on various approaches and barriers to treatment of mental health issues among medically ill patients.

Postcombat-Related Disorders: Counseling Veterans and Military Personnel, 2nd Edition

Price: $34.95 
Item # B4278  

Release Date: October 8, 2018

Expiration Date: October 8, 2021

With increasing frequency, military personnel and veterans experience mental health problems upon return from deployment. This intermediate-level course sensitizes mental health providers to military cultural norms. The course describes postdeployment transition, reintegration, and adjustment, and identifies common mistakes that clinicians make in treating this population. Military families are discussed, including marital satisfaction and the effects of military life on the spouse and children. Assessment and treatment methods for PTSD, depression, suicide risk, substance use disorders, and traumatic brain injury are all described. The various treatment methods are explained in detail, and include case vignettes to illustrate client and therapist interactions.

 

  • Social Workers participating in this course will receive 2 (clinical) continuing education clock hours upon successful course completion. Accreditations
  • Psychologists will receive 2 CE credits upon successfully completing this course. APA Approval

Disclosures
  • Courses must be completed on or before the expiration date noted in the course description above.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Western Schools ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Western Schools’ policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
Objectives

Course Objectives

  • Describe differences between military and mental health cultural norms and their impact on how combat veterans access mental health services.
  • Explain the challenges that combat veterans and their families face when transitioning, reintegrating, and readjusting from deployment.
  • Describe the prevalence, diagnostic criteria, and treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder and depression among combat veterans.
  • Describe effective treatments for suicidal behaviors, substance use, and traumatic brain injury among veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder and depression.
Author Bio(s)

Craig J. Bryan, PsyD, ABPP, is a board-certified clinical psychologist in cognitive behavioral psychol­ogy and is currently the executive director of the National Center for Veterans Studies at The University of Utah. Dr. Bryan received his PsyD in clinical psychology in 2006 from Baylor University and com­pleted his clinical psychology residency at the Wilford Hall Medical Center, Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. He was on the faculty of the Department of Psychology at Wilford Hall Medical Center, where he was chief of the primary care psychology service and manager of the suicide prevention program for Lackland Air Force Base. Dr. Bryan deployed to Balad, Iraq, in 2009, where he served as the director of the traumatic brain injury clinic at the Air Force Theater Hospital. Upon completion of his contrac­tual requirements, Dr. Bryan voluntarily separated from active-duty service shortly after his deploy­ment. He currently researches suicidal behaviors, suicide prevention strategies, psychological health, and resiliency. Considered a leading national expert on military suicide, Dr. Bryan is a consultant to the Department of Defense for psychological health promotion initiatives and suicide prevention and has briefed Congressional leaders on these topics. He has authored more than 100 scientific publications and book chapters on suicide risk and prevention among military personnel. Dr. Bryan was recognized by the Society for Military Psychology with the Arthur W. Melton Award for Early Career Achievement.

David C. Rozek, PhD, is a clinical psychologist and holds a primary appointment at The University of Utah in the Department of Psychiatry with a secondary appointment as the director of training at the National Center for Veterans Studies. He received his PhD from the University of Notre Dame and completed his residency at the Orlando Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Dr. Rozek’s research and clini­cal expertise are in cognitive and behavioral therapies for suicide, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder. He regularly provides training to clinicians and medical professionals about managing suicidal patients and is an active researcher focusing on how to best improve clinical care.

James Daley, PhD, is an associate professor at Indiana University School of Social Work and a member of the editorial board of the Advances in Social Work journal. He received his BS degree in psychology from Wofford College in Spartanburg, South Carolina, his MSW degree from the University of South Carolina, and his PhD in social work from Florida State University. With more than 24 years of clinical experience and 18 years as a military social work officer in the Air Force, Dr. Daley teaches family and group practice classes and is the chair of the Family Concentration Program. His research focus is on international military social work and families navigating chronic illness. He has written and presented extensively on issues facing military families. Dr. Daley has completed a families and illness fellowship at the Chicago Center for Family Health and advanced training in Gottman Method Couples Therapy.

Peer Reviewer Bio(s)

Joseph M. Holshoe, PMHNP-BC, is a board-certified family psychiatric nurse practitioner and a Commander in the U.S. Public Health Services. He currently serves as the deputy chief, Department of Behavioral Health, Bassett Army Community Hospital, Fort Wainwright, Alaska, where he provides psychiatric care to active-duty service members, dependents, and retirees. A recognized speaker on sleep, psychiatry, and military psychiatry, he has spoken to numerous professional audiences around the country and has served as a content expert and item writer for the American Nurses Credentialing Center national certification exam in Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing. CDR Holshoe has published on sleep issues and authored the chapter on sleep and antidepressants in the Encyclopedia of Sleep. He has also authored chapters on sleep-wake disorders and trauma- and stressor-related disorders for other Western Schools nursing continuing education courses.